On Computing Podcast
Grady Booch, one of UML's original authors, examines the stories at the intersection of computing and humanity.

NOTE: This podcast is no longer being updated, but please explore this archive of the valuable content that was published while it was active.

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By Grady Booch
The story of computing is the story of humanity. Civilization is filled with storytelling, which helps us understand our past, reconcile our present, and be intentional of our future. Similarly, as developers, we are the storytellers, using our software and our hardware as our brush and our canvas.
By Grady Booch
Computational humor is a technically intriguing problem. And, in the journey to understand the theories, mechanisms, and algorithms that discern and define funny, we learn something about ourselves and what it means to be human.
By Grady Booch
How do you disrupt an industry? Question the fundamental, sacred assumptions on which that industry is founded, then journey along the path of the possible.
By Grady Booch
The next generation of software-intensive systems will be taught instead of programmed. This poses considerable pragmatic challenges in how we develop, deliver, and evolve them.
By Grady Booch
The next generation of software-intensive systems will be taught instead of programmed. This poses considerable pragmatic challenges in how we develop, deliver, and evolve them.
By Grady Booch
We live in a world of unprecedented complexity and astonishing possibility. We should never forget our past, for those who came before us in computing enabled those possibilities.
By Grady Booch
Many fear the rise of superintelligent AIs. Such fears are at best unfounded and at worst misleading.
By Grady Booch
The story of computing is the story of humanity. This is a story of ambition, invention, creativity, vision, avarice, and serendipity, powered by a refusal to accept the limits of our bodies and minds.
By Grady Booch
Computing amplifies governments' actions but can also temper their behavior by enabling mechanisms for private communication and for open, transparent communication by a nation's people Similarly, governments can help focus the artifacts of computing on their citizens' health and happiness, and temper it as well.
By Grady Booch
Developing software-intensive systems is like many other things, but it's also like no other thing. For the general public, how software is made remains a mystery.
By Grady Booch
There was a time we could only dream of machines that served as companions, as helpmates, as servants. Now, we build them. As we slowly and inevitably and irreversibly surrender to these machines of our own creation, we must come to grips with a number of practical, ethical conundrums.
By Grady Booch
Parallels exist between the Industrial Revolution and our current computing revolution regarding risk, transparency, and responsibility. This article examines some of these parallels, the implications for society, and the individual developer's responsibility.
By Grady Booch
Each generation remakes itself. In the context of the historical, economic, technological, and cultural forces around it, each generation must confront, adapt, and evolve—or die; this is the nature of humankind. Still, some common threads exist that shape that evolution—threads that define our very humanity. Even in the face of the tumultuous changes brought about by computing, these threads persist and bring a poignant texture to a fully digital life.
By Grady Booch
There have been many periods in the unfolding of human history when we have asserted that it was possible to catalog all that was known or that could be known. Ignoring the pragmatic reality of trying to catalog an ever-expanding corpus, one must understand that such a task is further complicated by cultural and situational bias: what is important to know at one place and time is not necessary important in another. So it is with our present day; this raises the question, what must a functioning member of society know about computing?
By Grady Booch
Explores how technology shapes the person and the ideas behind our decisions. From developer to architect, from business analyst to user, there are a number of big questions whose answers shape the systems with which we engage. As individuals, we each play many roles in our lives and as such there are some even bigger questions that haunt us in our journey: questions that transcend any specific role, questions that can't be answered by technology.
By Grady Booch
From the inside of a software-intensive system, there are many different styles of implementation, each with its own subtle characteristics. From the outside, it all looks the same: it's completely invisible.
By Grady Booch
Storytelling involves weaving abstractions about fundamental truths regarding the world and the human experience to entertain and educate. When it comes to movies and television, producers and directors often make computer technology look like magic. It doesn't have to be that way.
By Grady Booch
Every line of code represents a moral decision; every bit of data collected, analyzed, and visualized has moral implications.
By Grady Booch
No matter your individual position on the matter, faith is a powerful element of the human experience. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many ways. Here, we explore computing as a medium for faith, as a ritual space, and as a technology that itself raises certain metaphysical issues.
By Grady Booch
There are three things that future generations may never experience: the smell of books, the sound of a computer, and the sanctuary of privacy. These human considerations are all unintended consequences of computing.
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   Meet the Author
Grady Booch is a Chief Scientist of Software Engineering at IBM. He is recognized internationally for improving the art and the science of software development and has served as architect and architectural mentor for numerous complex software-intensive systems around the world. The author of six best-selling books and several hundred articles on computing, he has lectured on topics as diverse as software methodology and the morality of computing. He is an IBM Fellow, an IEEE Fellow, an ACM Fellow, a World Technology Network Fellow, and a Software Development Forum Visionary.