Research
News about the latest peer-reviewed research by the world's most authoritative association for computing.

Recent Articles

By Lori Cameron
An ambitious proposal to end the digital isolation of those in the developing world calls upon tech and government leaders to create sweeping reforms that ensure access to digital information as a human right.
By Lori Cameron
The AI interviewer is so sophisticated that it will read your facial features, voice intonation, and word choices. Then it rates your personality on the Big Five Personality Traits scale: agreeableness, extroversion, neuroticism, openness, and conscientiousness. Your next job offer could depend on it.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers from Austria have developed a “cognitive assistance” framework for supporting human workers in industrial tasks—in their test case, assembly of an alpine sport product.
By Lori Cameron
Fifteen billion barrels of oil were burned worldwide last year—spewing a toxic mix of chemical gases, particulates, and petroleum hydrocarbons into the air, pollution that found its way into the cells of human bodies, the upper atmosphere, and all ecosystems and biomes in between. The planet is gasping—and so are we.
By Lori Cameron
Steve Jobs once said, “Technology alone is not enough—it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.” Find out how educators are doing just that.
By Lori Cameron
Mining tweets, blogs, and Facebook posts for health and drug-related information is of significant interest in what is called "pharmacovigilance" research.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine sitting across from a virtual hologram of a friend who lives thousands of miles away. Now, imagine touching and actually feeling your friend—or at least the digital version. It's not just the stuff of science fiction anymore.
By Lori Cameron
As smart cities fast become the norm, experts search for even better ways to fight big-city problems like reducing traffic and pollution. To this end, researchers from the University of Messina have studied how to advance the design and development of smart-mobility services using an open source platform called FIWARE.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers have taken gaming to a whole new level by developing a new bare-hand gesture interface with superior algorithms called ThunderPunch.
By Lori Cameron
While Einstein's famous equation E = MC2 accounts for a lot of powerful forces like gravity, solar power, and nuclear energy, it can't explain singularities—the point at which things become infinitely big or small—like black holes (small) and the Big Bang (big). When it comes to classical space-time, the laws of quantum physics just don't apply. Now, thanks to supercomputers, researchers might be able to reconcile the inconsistencies.
By Lori Cameron
Biometrics are booming—especially ocular and facial scans—but their potential for error and abuse concerns scientists, as well as the person being scanned. Our security, privacy, and freedom are at stake.
By Lori Cameron
Scientists made space exploration history on 12 November 2014 when, for the first time, a space probe landed on a comet. The speeding target was Churyumov-Gerasimenko—a dirty cosmic snowball slightly bigger than Mount Fuji. The space probe was the Philae lander—part of the European Space Agency's Rosetta program. But not everything went as planned.
By Lori Cameron
We all know about cryptography. It's what hackers typically used against you until now. Now meet its twin: steganography. It's the latest way that cybercriminals transmit malicious data, and it involves hiding a document, video, or photograph inside another file that seems legit. Here's how it works.
By Lori Cameron
No one goes to work wanting to throw a monkey wrench into a machine, but that's exactly what chaos engineers do—they create small problems in their software systems and fix them before they become big.
By Lori Cameron
As more and more businesses adopt Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) as part of their digital strategy, they face a choice between multi- or single-tenant cloud platforms.
By Lori Cameron
Now that more and more people are doing financial transactions and storing personal data online, service providers are looking at biometrics systems to improve security. However, recent studies show that biometric features can change over time—an effect called "template aging."
By Lori Cameron
From fitness to remote patient monitoring to home healthcare, wearable medical devices are about to substantially improve the way you are treated by your doctor. The market is expected to more than double to over $14 billion by 2022, however, leaving researchers scrambling to figure out how to coordinate and manage the massive amounts of data these devices will generate.
By Lori Cameron
As the Web gets bigger and mobile devices get smaller, power and access erode dramatically. Researchers now look to a most unlikely source—the marketing flop Google Glass—for answers.
By Lori Cameron
Recently, researchers have developed a complete information and communication technology system that uses smart devices, the Internet of Things (IoT), and imaging sensors to help people with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s live more independently.
By Lori Cameron
What do you get when computer science collides with art? How about a weather report. Seriously.
By Lori Cameron
The next generation of 360-degree cameras will revolutionize multimedia—allowing you to create your own high-resolution panoramic videos and VR gaming machinery like a pro. To make the technology more publicly accessible, a device must be affordable, portable, reliable, high quality, and user friendly, researchers say.
By Lori Cameron
While some artists prefer oils or acrylics, the medium of choice for Sally Weber is light—holography and laser traces, that is. Years ago, as a graduate student at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT, she studied under Otto Piene, a German artist specializing in kinetic and technology-based art.
By Lori Cameron
Code smells and architectural smells—also called bad smells—are symptoms of poor design that can hinder code understandability and decrease maintainability.
By Lori Cameron
The emergence of new chip technologies, memory technologies, and computing devices/paradigms requires new ways of assessing architectural risk.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers discuss the importance of new requirements for establishing policy standards as well as mechanisms for retaining privacy when analyzing users data.
By Lori Cameron
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems allow operators to control critical infrastructure. Vendors are increasingly integrating Internet technology into these devices, making them more susceptible to cyberattacks.
By Lori Cameron
As mobile devices take over the world, researchers now study how to build deep learning networks that can keep up. One collaboration between academia and industry has analyzed a number of related deep learning frameworks, and the results look promising.
By Lori Cameron
As the cost of healthcare skyrockets, a new digital health initiative promises to help save consumers and providers billions. It uses "extreme automation" to integrate thousands of healthcare systems, databases, programs, and apps into a seamless network of fast, remote, highly specialized healthcare services.
By Lori Cameron
Cyberbullying, porn, and internet addiction have parents worried about their teens' online safety. But most safety apps fail to help. Some are so wonky, they block good content as well as bad. Others allow invasion of privacy, which teens resent. Now, experts propose safety apps that allow teens to regulate themselves.
By Lori Cameron
Now that the definition of cloud computing is 7 years old—practically middle-aged in tech iteration years—it could use a fresher vocabulary to better describe it, says new research.
By Lori Cameron
Because they are less likely to pursue computer science as a career or, at the very least, as a significant part of their high school and college coursework, women and minorities have become the latest subjects of study for researchers wanting to learn how to increase their interest in computer tech.
By Lori Cameron
It sounds unnerving, but what if your cardiologist could reach into your chest, pull out your heart, examine it, and put it back—all without killing you or even doing surgery. Well, researchers are developing something like that already.
By Lori Cameron
To date, research in quantum computer engineering has focused primarily on the top and bottom layers of the system stack, leaving a gap between quantum software and hardware. Researchers present a quantum microarchitecture, QuMA, for a quantum processor that bridges the gap.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers propose a privacy framework for drones that safeguards against restricted areas—such as private property—as well as the collection of personal data from, say, bystanders in a crowd who happen to be near the commission of a crime.
By Lori Cameron
Scientists and researchers have a huge problem when it comes to accessing shared databases of research information—pure chaos. It’s a mess of poorly-organized information that often must be downloaded to be examined or is hidden in zip files that can’t even be searched. There must be a better way.
By Lori Cameron
A team of researchers from the United States and China propose a state-of-the-art system to improve the security and privacy in the cloud as we increasingly upload more of our smartphone photos there. Their proposal includes secure multiparty computation, digital watermarks, and homomorphic encryption.
By Lori Cameron
The study of the human brain's astronomical number of neuronal circuits—hundreds of trillions—overwhelms researchers, who desire to amass and organize our cerebral activity (in 3D no less) into one convenient database open to colleagues worldwide. Fourteen researchers in industry and academia prepare for the avalanche.
By Lori Cameron
Human traffickers don't play by the rules. They use elaborate encryption and often post sex ads once—changing phone numbers, names, and locations constantly to avoid detection. But a new investigative tool uses AI algorithms to scour dark web domains for traffickers and decode their cloaked lingo selling sex slaves.
By Lori Cameron
In an interview following up with Mayank Kejriwal, we learned that the DIG system has been greatly improved with more advanced algorithms, and a friendlier, more streamlined user interface.
By Lori Cameron
As wearables gain acceptance, we need to know what user interfaces will look like in a post-smartphone world and whether they will support sophisticated mobile interactions.
By Lori Cameron
For the roughly 450 million people worldwide who suffer from serious mental illness, a plan for new sensing technology promises to offer relief. Wearables and smartphones could help people who suffer mental illness by monitoring their activity, physical symptoms, and social interactions for warning signs of trouble.
By Lori Cameron
Over a half century ago, IBM designer Eliot Noyes wrote that computers “should not be like a ranch house. They should be like a Mies house. They should have that much integrity and joy.” By helping add the expression computer architecture to computing's lexicon, Noyes transformed computer engineering.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine waking each morning to your avatar in a magic mirror that talks to you and offers wardrobe suggestions based on your body type, the weather, chosen activity, and the fabrics best suited for it all.
By Lori Cameron
Because news outlets must verify eyewitness claims on social media under deadline, journalists are turning to social-computing approaches to automatically analyze and verify user-generated content in real time. Some solutions hold promise, but it may take deep learning to ensure a successful media verification assistant.
By Lori Cameron
Albert, Bill, Candace, and Donald know the limitations of the ADA all too well. For all the advancements provided by the Americans With Disabilities Act, these four blind people in their 50s and 60s still have a hard time riding public buses when not all destinations are announced or drivers simply blow past a stop.
By Lori Cameron
A video quality assessment mechanism for next-generation (5G) mobile networks is proposed by the authors of "An NFV-Based Video Quality Assessment Method over 5G Small Cell Networks," which appears in the October-December 2017 issue of IEEE MultiMedia.
By Lori Cameron
Here’s a riddle for you: How many robots does it take to patrol an area on some of the biggest missions possible—surveillance, search and rescue, mine clearing, military ops, environmental monitoring, and, yes, even household cleaning? Researchers have now devised a set of equations to answer that question.
By Lori Cameron
Use of the Python language in scientific computing has always been characterized by the coexistence of interpreted Python code and compiled native code, written in languages like C or Fortran.
By Lori Cameron
For many software development teams, the first aspects that come to mind regarding continuous delivery (CD) are the operational challenges & competitive benefits. In the authors' experience, CD was much more: it was a survival technique. This article presents how and why they applied CD in a large governmental project.
By Lori Cameron
The key driving force behind any capture-the-flag competition is the scoring algorithm; the Cyber Grand Challenge was no different. The scoring algorithm encouraged development of automated reasoning about software, discouraged collusion and cheating, and represented real-world constraints.
By Lori Cameron
A customer data platform is a relatively new tool for marketers that is designed to cull far-flung data about customers across silos and systems and then provide a unified view of a customer and his or her behavior into an always-processing profile. Here's how the database works.
By Lori Cameron
Interactive and multi-sensory technologies now transform an ordinary classroom into a "Magic Room" where children with attention deficit disorder, autism, Down Syndrome and other neuro-developmental problems can play and learn in what researchers are calling a new kind of smart space.
By Lori Cameron
Blockchain, the technology underlying the boom in cryptocurrency, is now being considered for a more intimate use—your medical and health records.
By Lori Cameron
Computing pioneer Anne-Louise Guichard Radimsky's journey from France to America documents how more than one path exists for women seeking careers in science and engineering. “As a student, Anne-Louise always tried to challenge herself by looking for the toughest path,” writes Irina Nikivincze of Georgia Tech.
By Lori Cameron
Most scientists would agree that nothing livens up a technical presentation like colorful images and cool graphics. But, more importantly, they can make the relevance and meaning of information instantly accessible.
By Lori Cameron
Staying motivated can be a pain for people struggling to lose weight. Wouldn’t it be great to be able to determine the nutritional value of your food at a glance or get encouragement when you need it? Well, now you can. Meet "Lucy," a digital assistant that helps patients undergoing weight-loss treatment.
By Lori Cameron
Several years ago, over 28,000 people contracted the Ebola virus and nearly half of them died. Although they can't be sure, health officials believe the outbreak started when a young child in West Africa came in contact with a fruit bat. Tracking fruit bats and other wildlife can help stop the spread of disease.
By Lori Cameron
Elizabeth Petrick from the New Jersey Institute of Technology analyzes the writings of the Homebrew Computer Club between 1975 and 1977, in order to understand how their values became embedded in the technology they built, establishing how the personal computer should be used and thought of.
By Lori Cameron
Envisioning a future where shape-changing lines are woven into daily life, researchers explore new uses for line-based shape-changing interfaces and encourage future researchers and designers to investigate these novel directions.
By Lori Cameron
Math.js is a JavaScript library that brings advanced mathematics to the web browser and server. The case study presented in the article "Math.Js: An Advanced Mathematics Library For JavaScript," appearing in Computing in Science & Engineering, demonstrates its flexibility by extending the library with custom functions to solve and optimize a rocket trajectory.
By Lori Cameron
A broad, long-term research project is described, which will lead to the computer becoming an equal member of the system-development team, continuously making positive contributions, not unlike those expected from an experienced and knowledgeable customer or user, a conscientious QA engineer, a strict regulatory auditor, an engineering team leader, or the organization's CTO.
By Lori Cameron
Two things drive the building of smart environments: using the Internet of Things and delivering a user experience to ensure we better manage water and energy. So IoT developers used psychology's "Trans-Theoretical Model of behavior change" to create user experiences that will encourage people to conserve more.
By Lori Cameron
Energy-harvesting devices are one giant step closer to simpler, greener technology. They derive power from solar, thermal, wind, and kinetic energy without all the messy wires and batteries.
By Lori Cameron
NASA has been successfully sustaining the continuous operation of its critical navigation software systems for over 12 years. To accomplish this, NASA scientists must continuously monitor their process, report on current system quality, forecast maintenance effort, and sustain required staffing levels.
By Lori Cameron
An important problem in the animation of virtual characters is the expression of complex mental states using the coordinated prosody of voice, rhythm, facial expressions, and head and gaze motion.
By Lori Cameron
By exploring sensing capabilities and mobilewireless interfaces and integrating them with human intelligence, mobile crowdsourcing is an effective paradigm for large multimedia applications. However, most MCS schemes use a mode in which workers select tasks and contribute without collaborating with each other.
By Lori Cameron
Today’s companies collect immense amounts of personal data and enable wide access to it within the company, exposing the data to hackers and privacy-transgressing employees. Researchers from Microsoft, Uber, and Columbia University show that only a fraction of the data is needed to approach state-of-the-art accuracy.
By Lori Cameron
A new term has crept into the lexicon of internet slang—TL;DR—which means “too long; didn’t read.” Busy people simply don’t have the time to read great walls of uninterrupted text. That’s why researchers are developing applications that will add pictures to text so that readers can determine if it’s worth their time.
By Lori Cameron
As the elderly population grows, the need to alleviate the workload of a strained elder care labor force grows too. Elderly people need physical activity and mental stimulation to stay healthy. That’s why researchers are developing assistive robots that can plan activities for participants in a retirement home.
By Lori Cameron
Under late chairman and CEO Thomas J. Watson Sr., IBM rose to a global power in computing with technical and service superiority and victory in lucrative defense contracts. But Watson also cultivated a devoted labor force and progressive corporate culture well ahead of its time, emphasizing a “family” atmosphere.
By Lori Cameron
Classical approaches use a vector representation of soccer robots’ positions and Bayesian filters to propagate them over time. However, these approaches suffer from the data association problem. Researchers propose a new methodology for the robust tracking of robots based on the Random Finite Sets framework.
By Lori Cameron
Nowadays, more and more companies migrate business from their own servers to the cloud. With the influx of computational requests, datacenters consume tremendous energy every day, attracting great attention in the energy efficiency dilemma.
By Lori Cameron
Messages posted to social media in the aftermath of a natural disaster have value beyond detecting the event itself. Researchers say that mining such deliberately dropped digital traces provides a timely estimate of the disaster's consequences on the population and infrastructures.
By Lori Cameron
As some researchers work to end our reliance on fossil fuels, others strive to develop cleaner-burning coal by optimizing the coal combustion process. The research relies heavily on data visualization systems. “One of the problems with which researchers of different domains, such as chemistry and fluid dynamics, are concerned is…
By Lori Cameron
The order in which a software development team puts their backlog items—or necessary technical tasks—into effect determines when stakeholders can reap benefits from each piece of software functionality.
By Lori Cameron
Society’s increasing use of connected sensing and wearable computing has created robust demand for ultra-low-power (ULP) edge computing devices and associated system-on-chip (SoC) architectures, according to David Brooks of Harvard University and John Sartori of University of Minnesota, in their article "Ultra-Low-Power Processors," which appears in the November/December 2017 issue of IEEE Micro.
By Lori Cameron
Deep learning—the technology that simulates the human brain in how it makes decisions based new knowledge—now empowers robots to better solve problems and recognize complex real-world patterns. It heralds a new age for robots. DL also ranks No. 1 on the IEEE Computer Society's list of tech trends to watch in 2018.
By Lori Cameron
International cybercrime has now become so extensive, underground suppliers use the dark web to offer criminals easy access to the tools, programming frameworks, and services required to carry out borderless cyberattacks. Here are six security challenges if digital forensics are to win the war against cybercrime.
By Lori Cameron
Disinformatics reveals itself at the intersection of technology, propaganda, and miscreants. It’s the glue that holds together modern faux news outlets, AM talk radio, Twitterstorms, and other sorts of sociopolitical babble. It’s ideologically grounded in postmodern logic. And it should be a new academic discipline.
By Lori Cameron
Think smart devices: watches, belts, ear buds, sewn-in accessories, implantables, body patches, eyeglasses, and even tattoos will be the next wearables to supplant smartphones as mobile tech improves. Success will ride on device resilience, evaluation methods, sustainable software, and wearer compliance.
By Lori Cameron
Crowdsensing helps people find real-time information fast—but exposes sharers' private information. That’s why researchers are studying ways to protect your privacy that encrypt your data, “cloak” your location, and use facial recognition to obscure your face in multimedia data transfers.
By Lori Cameron
On September 20, 2015, Amazon Web Services experienced an outage that ripped through its cloud database services, affecting many well-established, tech savvy companies and costing them several hours of operation.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
Financially troubled Goodyear turned to nuclear weapons facility Sandia National Labs to take a big risk in the 1990s on using computers to design and test new tires--which R&D executives had earlier mocked. The virtual prototyping helped save Goodyear, upended 100 years of tradition, and was copied by industry giants.
By Lori Cameron
Mechanical counters have been ubiquitous, and they had become so commonplace that little thought now is given to them. Denis Roegel analyzes three of the earliest known models of counters, which can be viewed as ancestors of the modern mechanical: the ones by Péreire (1751), Schwilgué (1844) and Évrard (1846).
By Lori Cameron
Researchers present the design and prototyping of an innovative smart deep brain stimulator that consists of brain-implantable smart electrodes and a wireless-connected external controller. The electrodes operate as autonomous electronic implants that are capable of sensing and recording neural activities in real time.
By Lori Cameron
Polytechnic University of Bari researchers in Italy's bootheel create a virtual reality device in a 20-foot container called Multisensory Apulia Touristic Experience (MATE), which simulates the ocean spray, sights, sounds, and smells of southern Italy's Apulia region in an effort to convince tourists to visit there.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers present unique unsolicited email detection system based specifically on the sequence and syntax of SMTP commands during email delivery. The authors present improvements for detecting unsolicited email sources from botnets that can be used during network forensic investigation.
By Lori Cameron
Typhlex is a deformable device prototype with strategically placed grooves to elicit bend gestures. Researchers conducted studies with sighted and blind participants, comparing bend gestures to touch. Their findings suggest that while easily learnable and enjoyable, it had yet to improve blind users’ performance.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers survey current federal policies and activities impacting technology developers, with special emphasis on privacy, cybersecurity, safety regulation, energy and environment, and ethical issues.
By Lori Cameron
Medical devices are complex cyber-physical systems incorporating emergent hardware and software components. However, this complexity leads to a wide attack surface posing security risks and vulnerabilities.
By Lori Cameron
New technologies let companies manage their intellectual resources with more effective methods. The complex nature of these management processes, however, make it cumbersome to design a system based on relational databases. This research provides guidance in seeking other approaches to traditional knowledge management.
By Lori Cameron
Smart drones can detect and film athletes in motion, track criminals, and deliver packages to your door. But machine learning in any intelligent system can drain energy, so a new study by the University of Texas at Austin shows how to keep power usage down and keep drones aloft longer by shifting workload to the cloud.
By Michael Martinez
Stay professionally fit, always, say San Murugesan, who ends his four-year term as editor in chief of the IEEE Computer Society's IT Professional magazine.
By Lori Cameron
Blockchain, the technology underlying the boom in cryptocurrency, is now being considered for a more intimate use—your medical and health records.
By Lori Cameron
In the Mid-1960s, the Laboratory at Los Alamos, New Mexico, a center of scientific computing since the Manhattan Project, embarked on a search for a new supercomputer intended to fulfill the growing need for computing power in nuclear weapons development.
By Lori Cameron
A new collaborative hyping detection model hunts for fake review chains, offering e-commerce sites such as Amazon and Alibaba's Taobao a way to fight back.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
Amazon and academic researchers have devised a data collection app using Apple and Android devices to analyze walking, sitting, running, music listening, and TV watching—or the context of human behavior "in the wild"—whose findings that could help health monitoring.
By Lori Cameron
The main challenge facing simulation-based hydrodynamic design of naval ships comes from the complexity of the salient physics involved around ships, which is further compounded by the multidisciplinary nature of ship applications. Simulation of the flow physics using "first principles" is computationally very expensive and time-consuming.
By Lori Cameron
In the past, the job of rendering realistic animated faces was painstaking at best. Now, recent advances in animation greatly reduce the time involved in creating characters.
By Lori Cameron
In a future where hundreds of smart networked devices will be embedded in our everyday environments, the question of how to program the world around us arises.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers in China have developed an advanced child monitoring system called ChildGuard to help parents and guardians monitor their children.
By Lori Cameron
In the article "Energy-Efficient Near-Threshold Parallel Computing: The PULPv2 Cluster," which appears in the September/October 2017 issue of IEEE Micro, the authors present an ultra-low-power parallel computing platform and its system-on-chip (SoC) embodiment, targeting a wide range of emerging near-sensor processing tasks for Internet of Things (IoT) applications.
By Lori Cameron
The Context-Aware Recommender System (CARS) offers advice and recommended fitness routes using crowdsourcing and smart city sensors.
By Lori Cameron
As cell phone users await the next generation of Internet speed—5G—security experts prepare "honeynets" and other strategies against cyber-criminals who infect millions of devices and turn them into attackers called botnets, one of the most powerful cyber threats partly because phone owners are often unaware.
By Lori Cameron
Authentication and authorization are essential parts of basic security processes and are sorely needed in the Internet of Things (IoT).
By Lori Cameron
As automakers prepare for the next generation of motoring, they find themselves in the midst of a fundamental shift in the way those vehicles are built. The technology will be driven more by software than mechanics. In other words, today’s premium vehicles will run on code as much as gasoline.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
Researchers devise a datastream mining approach to computationally derive real-time decision rules for formulating type-1 diabetes insulin therapy.
By Lori Cameron
We all know about the Internet of Things, those everyday objects such as thermostats, cars, lights, fridges, and other appliances that we can access online. It was just a matter of time, then, before we invented the Internet of Things-We-Don't-Talk-About. The IoTWDTA era is here, but some of it might be, um, too delicate to broach in polite company.
By Lori Cameron
Intimate partner abuse can be a harrowing, life-threatening experience for victims. Unfortunately, current tech advances seem more often to aid the abuser in contacting, tracking down, harassing, and intimidating the survivor.
By Lori Cameron
A spectrum exists between microwave and infrared waves that promises to redefine “high-speed” wireless communication. It is called the millimeter wave spectrum (mmWave), which has a range of 30 to 300 Ghz, and it will kick 5th generation networks into overdrive.
By Lori Cameron
Autonomous robots are actively studied for many unmanned applications. However, the heavy costs and limited battery life make it difficult to implement intelligent decision-making in robots. In response, researchers propose a low-power deep search engine (code-named "BRAIN") for real-time path planning of intelligent autonomous robots. To achieve low power consumption while maintaining high performance, BRAIN adopts a multi-threaded core architecture with a transposition table cache to detect and avoid duplicated searches between the processors at the deeper level of the search tree.
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
Long before Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft, there was IBM and its international network of branch offices. IBM’s 800 branch offices in 170 countries were the computing industry’s early empire, spearheading the firm’s explosive growth worldwide for over a century. To be a manager of a “B/O”—as branch offices were…
By Lori Cameron
Earthquake ground motions pose an ever present risk to engineered structures and the infrastructure that modern life depends on. Civilization has evolved in close proximity to active earthquake faults and sedimentary basins that amplify seismic motions. However, many cities at high ground motion risk haven’t experienced damaging motions due to long time intervals between large earthquake events.
By Lori Cameron
A new visual analytics system, the Urban Space Explorer, developed at the University of North Carolina, uses tweets and geo-spatial data for urban planning.
By Lori Cameron
Big brother is going to need a lot of cloud and edge computing. As surveillance cameras are projected to grow 20% worldwide every year for the next five years, they will need strict real-time analytics to mine video content, and that scenario will demand a system of public clouds, private clusters, and edges, according to a new study by analysts with Microsoft Research.
By Lori Cameron
Augmented reality (AR) on smartphones has been soaring to new heights thanks to breakthroughs in AR algorithms. In July 2016, Niantic and Nintendo released Pokemon Go, triggering millions of downloads in one week. One month later, social media giant Tencent organized the virtual Olympic torch relay on smartphones, encouraging 100 million to use AR techniques provided by HiScene.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
TripAdvisor is the most successful online forum in the travel and tourism industry. Easily the world’s largest travel community, it reaches 390 million unique visitors each month and lists 465 million reviews and opinions about more than 7 million accommodations, restaurants, and attractions in 49 markets worldwide.
By Lori Cameron
Fueled by the growth of ultrahigh definition videos and Internet-capable portable devices, soaring video traffic is consuming massive amounts of network bandwidth. To alleviate traffic and improve service, researchers are turning to edge devices, offering users cash rewards to contribute their available storage and upload bandwidth to distribute video content to other users.
By Lori Cameron
On October 21, 2016, numerous platforms and services—including Amazon, Twitter, Spotify, and the New York Times—were shut down by an overwhelming denial-of-service attack targeting Dyn, which is an internet performance, online infrastructure, and domain registration services company that serves users across Europe and North America.
By Lori Cameron
Computational dreaming (CD) is inspired by the massively parallel structure and dreaming process of the human brain. CD examines previously observed input data during a "dream phase" executed while normal inputs are shut off when a device is not in use.
By Lori Cameron
Data analytics takes enormous quantities of information about everything from traffic management and fraud detection to disease outbreak and natural disaster and tries to make sense of it. Cities, disaster relief agencies, doctors, and businesses rely heavily on it. Moreover, the more critical the situation, the faster the data analysis is needed, which is why edge devices are so crucial. But there is a crisis.
By Lori Cameron
As Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency soar to $190 billion in value this month, the challenge remains whether blockchain has an even a bigger future and can ultimately be applied to mainstream markets such as the financial technology sector, or FinTech.
By Lori Cameron
Information technology and the proliferation of mobile devices provide an opportunity for patients to manage their own health conditions without the need for expensive medical treatments.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
Tech wasn’t always a man’s world. Editor’s note: This featured research and article were selected as a finalist for the annual 2018 Los Angeles Press Club Awards, which saw record entries this year from the biggest U.S. publishing, broadcasting, online, and media outlets. This content was, in fact, one of two…
By Lori Cameron
While eyeglasses have improved the lives of millions of people, many wearers are painfully aware of how weird glasses can make their eyes look. The eyes of near-sighted wearers appear smaller through the lens, while the eyes of far-sighted wearers appear larger.
By Lori Cameron
The order in which a software development team puts their backlog items—or necessary technical tasks—into effect determines when stakeholders can reap benefits from each piece of software functionality.
By Lori Cameron
E-commerce, smartphones, and social networks provide numerous benefits but require users to disclose personal information and, in some cases, behavior patterns such as purchasing histories.
By Lori Cameron
For many years, scientists studying Mars have asked themselves, “Where did the atmosphere and water go?” The key lies in understanding how solar wind plasma interacts with Mars’ atmosphere. Scientists believe Mars used to have a strong magnetic core that held its atmosphere together, but the low-density iron core grew…
By Lori Cameron
Each year, the Marine Advanced Technology Education Center holds a remotely operated underwater-vehicle competition, with students from around the world undertaking tasks that simulate real-world implementations. A Purdue University team took home two first-place team awards and an individual achievement award.
By Lori Cameron
The emergence of what experts call "digital intelligence"—the capacity of a company to understand and leverage the power of information technology to their advantage—can make or break a company.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
In an interview following up with Mayank Kejriwal, we learned that the DIG system has been greatly improved with more advanced algorithms, and a friendlier, more streamlined user interface.
By Lori Cameron
Child sexual exploitation and trafficking is a serious and widespread epidemic proliferated by the internet’s vast international network of traffickers, pedophiles, and pornographers searching for victims.
By Lori Cameron
As cloud computing, fog computing, and the Internet of Things put sensors and devices everywhere, cybercriminals exploit opportunities to steal personal information, wreak havoc on business operations, engage in hacking/phishing or malicious attacks, stalk people, or even engage in the abuse and sexual exploitation of children.
By Lori Cameron
Computer science education is engaging in an unprecedented effort to expand learning opportunities in K-12 CS education, especially among women and minorities. However, one group of students is often overlooked: those with specific learning disabilities and related attention deficit disorders. As CS education initiatives grow, K-12 teachers need research-informed guidance to make computing more accessible for students who learn differently.
By Lori Cameron
With profits topping $91 billion worldwide last year, the gaming industry is about to turn an unprecedented corner in immersive, realistic video game play.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine a child lost in a national forest, missing for hours. Search and rescue professionals might scour the area by vehicle or foot, or fly a helicopter overhead in hopes of spotting the child. The limitations of such efforts are obvious—vehicle or foot searches can be painstakingly slow, while trees, brush, rocky terrain, and bodies of rushing water can impede progress. Helicopters, likewise, can only fly so low. Spotting the child depends on luck and how well the pilots can see.
By Lori Cameron
Energy-harvesting devices are one giant step closer to simpler, greener technology. They derive power from solar, thermal, wind, and kinetic energy without all the messy wires and batteries.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine actually feeling a boxer's punch against your face in your virtual reality headset. Imagine feeling your foot smacking against a virtual soccer ball. Or imagine feeling the force of a crosswind as you try to navigate your virtual plane through the air.
By Lori Cameron
George Washington University computer science professor, Poorvi Vora, once said, "Brush your teeth. Eat your spinach. Audit your elections." This is the prevailing wisdom among researchers who were disappointed that the 2016 US presidential election results were not audited to confirm who won.
By Michael Martinez
More than ever, the nation's 83,000 working journalists are being pressed to explain complicated information in easy-to-understand graphs and illustrations, especially as audiences migrate to mobile, social, and other digital platforms.
By Lori Cameron
Now that Moore’s Law is grinding down, researchers are looking for the kind of revolutionary innovation that will go far beyond the incremental advances in semi-conductor technology that have been made over the past 40 years.
By Lori Cameron
Cloud computing, fog computing—the terms themselves reflect the hazy understanding people have of what those things mean. By way of analogy, imagine a central bank where everyone deposits their money and manages their accounts. The storing and processing of their cash is done off-site (as opposed to stuffing their mattresses with cash and running the risk of fire or theft).
By Michael Martinez
Internet co-founder Vinton Cerf, a Computer Society author and Google’s chief Internet evangelist, writes about how society faces a dilemma between a free Internet and those who use it for malware and fake news.
By Lori Cameron
Blockchain technology promises to revolutionize the world of finance, banking, and contract negotiation.
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
If Google wants more women engineers—and possibly avoid the embarrassing debacle over an internal memo claiming that biological differences explain why so few females work in tech—then it should consider a path that researchers say will promote diversity in Silicon Valley.
By Lori Cameron
Since 2014, Apple has provided seamless end-to-end encryption for its iMessage and FaceTime services. While its services are vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks and law enforcement requests, it is still enviable to digital giants like Google and Yahoo who are developing their own similar approaches to email encryption.
By Lori Cameron
Many of the major cities in Latin American face ongoing challenges of violence and economic inequality. That’s why researchers from Switzerland and Mexico have created SenseCityVity, a program to help the young citizens (high school students, ages 16–18) of Guanajuato City, Mexico—one of the most important mining towns in the 16th century—define, document, and reflect on their city’s problems.
By Lori Cameron
Thirty years ago, the first minimally invasive surgery was performed—the laparoscopic removal of a gallbladder. Since then, robotics have taken minimally invasive surgery to a whole new level.
By Lori Cameron
Historian Michael Mahoney has urged researchers to probe deeper into computer software’s past in order to "reveal the roots of that [PC] software in the earlier period."
By Lori Cameron
You might remember the Volkswagen emissions scandal from 2015 where Volkswagen was charged with violating clean air standards in cars they sold from 2008 to 2015. The company built emissions systems designed to pass emissions testing but that emitted up to 40 times more nitrous oxides into the air otherwise.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers say that the "digital universe" will grow to more than 16 zettabytes in 2017. How much is that, you ask? Sixteen zettabytes is equal to roughly 16 billion terabytes or 16 trillion gigabytes. And as big data and the Internet of Things grow, we will see an even greater explosion of data. This raises the question: Where will we store it all?
By Lori Cameron
Everyone hates to weed through an avalanche of spam in their inbox just to get to the good stuff. We want notes from friends and family, important business documents, relevant information, critical notices, and valuable product offers.
By Lori Cameron
For a long time, the conventional wisdom about tagging images was to use clear, precise words that interpret the picture exactly. For example, with the ubiquitous cat photo, you would use (cat, cats, kitten, cat lover, tabby). Pretty straightforward.
By Lori Cameron
While the controversy still simmers about Russia’s hacking into the recent US presidential election, it was actually the controversial Bush/Gore election of 2000 that led to an upsurge in voting system research. The goal then was to provide a foolproof computerized verification system that would let voters know their vote was tallied correctly.
By Lori Cameron
Authentication and authorization are essential parts of basic security processes and are sorely needed in the Internet of Things (IoT).
By Lori Cameron and Michael Martinez
Researchers are offering a design for an app that would allow physical therapists to remotely monitor an elderly person's gait and physical health status and then allow them to remotely intervene and provide therapies to the elderly person so that he or she can overcome any risk of falling.
By Lori Cameron
Gone are the days of punching holes in a ballot and dropping it into a box on election day. Internet voting is here. But instead of a few minutes behind a curtain, imagine receiving a code sheet in the mail prior to election day with voting codes next to candidate names.
By Lori Cameron
In computing circles, Heinz Rutishauser and Niklaus Wirth of Switzerland are well known for their contributions to the history of computing: Rutishauser developed the GQ-algorithm, and Wirth developed the Pascal programming language.
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
Researchers now study Twitter for the next major advancement in social media: It's called “influence maximization”—which is identifying a fixed number of influencers whose opinions can sway the biggest audiences.
By Lori Cameron
Since fog computing’s unique infrastructure has communication network devices scattered everywhere, mobile device users can expect to see better and faster connections to a multitude of mobile applications.
By Lori Cameron
It’s no secret that tech is bursting with brand new, well-paying middle class jobs, but one group has been disturbingly excluded from the bonanza—women. Women in tech are being left behind in today's job explosion. By 2025, experts predict the computing workforce will be only 20 percent women, a forecast made worse by how fewer women now major in computer science.
By Lori Cameron
Early exposure, access to rigorous computing classes, and having friends who are also interested in computing go a long way toward getting young women interested in computing.
By Lori Cameron
The Internet of Things is paving the way for the “smart city,” one in which waste management, air pollution, crime prevention, and traffic congestion are monitored and controlled in the most efficient ways possible.
By Lori Cameron
Scientists in the May/June 2017 issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications are showing how "data comics" can be an extremely effective way to communicate high-tech ideas to a diverse, global community.
By Lori Cameron
As the hundreds of billions of devices connected to the Internet of Things continues to grow, researchers are reimagining the conventional architecture of cloud datacenters.
By Lori Cameron
A team of researchers from the United States and China propose a state-of-the-art system to improve the security and privacy in the cloud as we increasingly upload more of our smartphone photos there. Their proposal includes secure multiparty computation, digital watermarks, and homomorphic encryption.
By Lori Cameron
The emergence of what experts call "digital intelligence"—the capacity of a company to understand and leverage the power of information technology to their advantage—can make or break a company.
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
The IEEE Computer Society first reported on the cutting-edge research into Amazon's recommendation algorithm when the nonprofit tech association published "Two Decades of Recommender Systems at Amazon.com" by personalization analytics senior manager Brent Smith of Amazon.com and artificial intelligence researcher Greg Linden, formerly of Amazon and now with Microsoft.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine a vehicle that does more than drive itself. This car will serve as a second office, entertainment room, or even bedroom—all while driving you to your destination, dropping you off, parking itself in any available spot, and returning to pick you up.
By Lori Cameron
This article discusses easy and smart analytics through the example of Watson Analytics; reviews Watson Analytics capabilities, strengths, and limitations; and analyzes data in two case studies.
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
Computing pioneer Andrew V. Haeff, a Moscow-born inventor of several important vacuum tubes, was working in the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in the 1940s when he designed a breakthrough invention: a cathode ray “Memory Tube” that he said could serve as a “computer memory device … to store, and to…
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
He will search your H.S. yearbooks, old employee directories, and other dusty docs to find you. His name is Arvid Nelsen, chronicler of untold stories about tech’s racial minorities. Like the Oscar-nominated film “Hidden Figures,” Nelsen wants to honor those whom history has forgotten. He’s digging deep. Read a Q&A with him by the IEEE Computer Society.
By Michael Martinez and Lori Cameron
He will search your H.S. yearbooks, old employee directories, and other dusty docs to find you. His name is Arvid Nelsen, chronicler of untold stories about tech’s racial minorities. Like the Oscar-nominated film “Hidden Figures,” Nelsen wants to honor those whom history has forgotten. He’s digging deep. Read a Q&A with him by the IEEE Computer Society.
By Lori Cameron
When professors use software programs to teach introductory classes, it’s frustrating when students have to spend more time learning the program than learning the course material itself. Edward Angel, professor of computer science at the University of New Mexico, addresses this issue by analyzing the evolution of OpenGL (a program for rendering 2D and 3D graphics) over the past 25 years, and proposing a different program, WebGL, be used in current introductory computer graphics courses. The new JavaScript-based program is easier to use and more compatible with current software and hardware.
By Lori Cameron
Cloud computing, fog computing—the terms themselves reflect the hazy understanding people have of what those things mean. By way of analogy, imagine a central bank where everyone deposits their money and manages their accounts. The storing and processing of their cash is done off-site (as opposed to stuffing their mattresses with cash and running the risk of fire or theft).
By Lori Cameron
What happens when you combine athletic prowess with augmented reality and wearable technology? You get superhuman sports—a controversial part of conventional sports when it involves, for example, the use of prosthetics for amputees—but also a whole new promising area of sports competition in its own right.
By Lori Cameron
Conventional methods of irrigation have always required that farmers pay attention to light, humidity, and temperature as well as levels of nitrogen and carbon in the soil.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine a concert where, instead of just listening to the music, you can participate in making it. Open Symphony is an interactive system that allows audience members to collaborate with the performers in creating the score. For example, as musicians in a string quartet play, the audience members can watch a graphical display representing the performers and their playing modes. The audience can then vote for various musical modes that the performers can then play. The system is easy enough for even untrained audience members to use.
By Lori Cameron
The neocortex is the most advanced and complex part of the brain, making it an area of great interest to neuroscientists and computer engineers alike. If computer engineers can understand the basic computing paradigms at work in the neocortex, they could create computing systems with some of those same capabilities.
By Lori Cameron
Elon Musk, founder and CEO of SpaceX, and famed theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking believe that artificial intelligence is "our biggest existential threat"—that unchecked development of AI could potentially annihilate humanity.
By Lori Cameron
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the largest astronomical survey, producing 200 gigabytes of data every night. While it has already acquired nearly a million field images of more than 200 million galaxies, future surveys will amass even greater data volumes. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently in development, promises to capture a whopping 30,000 gigabytes of data every night (30 terabytes), requiring efficient and accurate analysis of never-before-seen cosmological events. The challenge of big data is teaching computers to capture galaxy images while determining the properties of those galaxies with high precision.
By Lori Cameron
Gone are the days of simple smart-home tech—alarms, controlled lights, and garage door openers. Today, for example, smart homes are capable of saving you money by monitoring and adjusting your use of water, electricity, and gas. Also, cameras, sensors, and door locks allow for greater security.
By Lori Cameron
Ask Richard F. Martin, physics professor at Illinois State University, about the state of computational physics education, and he’ll tell you it needs improvement. As a highly specialized area of study, it attracts few students, causing some universities to drop the program altogether. Additionally, while the field of computational physics…
By Lori Cameron
Going under anesthesia might seem like a minor affair to some patients, but it is fraught with potentially dangerous risks. Anesthesiologists ask careful preoperative questions about health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, seizures, and sleep apnea.
By Lori Cameron
Every two years, IEEE Intelligent Systems acknowledges and celebrates 10 young stars in the field of AI as "AI's 10 to Watch." These accomplished researchers have all completed their doctoral work in the past five years. Despite being relatively junior in their career, each one has made impressive research contributions and had an impact in the literature — and in some cases, in real-world applications as well.
By Gary Singh
Alvaro Ocampo traversed many landscapes to arrive at his current space in the digital art landscape. After graduating with an architecture degree from the Universidad Piloto de Colombia in Bogota, Colombia, he made his way to Montreal, where he studied fine art and spent extensive time honing his etching talents at L’atelier Circulaire, an artist-run printmaking center. Ocampo then made his way to the digital world, where he is no longer subjected to the tyranny of the one-off.
By Gary Singh
What did someone with a PhD in biochemistry do in the 1980s when he wasn't playing banjo or trumpet? If he could program in DOS, he eventually discovered fractals. Ron Barnett always harbored an interest in art—he took drawing classes when he was young—but his college life was simply too jammed with academic and scientific research to include any serious visual art activities. He had to wait.
   About the Authors
Michael Martinez, the editor of the Computer Society's Computer.Org website and its social media, has covered technology as well as global events while on the staff at CNN, Tribune Co. (based at the Los Angeles Times), and the Washington Post.
Lori Cameron is a Senior Writer for the IEEE Computer Society and currently writes regular features for Computer magazine, Computing Edge, and the Computing Now and Magazine Roundup websites. For over 20 years, she has been a professor of writing and literature at DeVry University, Long Beach, as well as a free-lance technical writer. Lori received a master of arts in English from the California State Polytechnic University in 1992, and a bachelor of arts in writing from Indiana Wesleyan University in 1988.