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  Aravindhan Anbazhagan is working as a development associate with Teach for India, a non-profit organization in the education sector. He is an active volunteer of IEEE and the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Richard E. Merwin Student Scholarship, MGA Larry K Wilson- Outstanding Asia-Pacific Student Volunteer Award, and EAB…
By Lori Cameron
Push-button interfaces are everywhere—microwaves, toasters, coffee makers, thermostats, printers, copiers, checkout terminals, kiosks, and remote controls. And while they afford most of us great convenience, they are largely inaccessible to people who are visually-impaired.
By Lori Cameron
In the realm of computing pioneers, Dame Stephanie "Steve" Shirley is one of the most celebrated, not only for building a $3 billion tech empire in 1960s England, but for doing it with an all-female, work-from-home staff of professionally qualified women who had left the work force after marrying and having children.
By Lori Cameron
An ambitious proposal to end the digital isolation of those in the developing world calls upon tech and government leaders to create sweeping reforms that ensure access to digital information as a human right.
By Lori Cameron
The AI interviewer is so sophisticated that it will read your facial features, voice intonation, and word choices. Then it rates your personality on the Big Five Personality Traits scale: agreeableness, extroversion, neuroticism, openness, and conscientiousness. Your next job offer could depend on it.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers from Austria have developed a “cognitive assistance” framework for supporting human workers in industrial tasks—in their test case, assembly of an alpine sport product.
By Lori Cameron
Fifteen billion barrels of oil were burned worldwide last year—spewing a toxic mix of chemical gases, particulates, and petroleum hydrocarbons into the air, pollution that found its way into the cells of human bodies, the upper atmosphere, and all ecosystems and biomes in between. The planet is gasping—and so are we.
By Lori Cameron
Steve Jobs once said, “Technology alone is not enough—it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.” Find out how educators are doing just that.
By Lori Cameron
Mining tweets, blogs, and Facebook posts for health and drug-related information is of significant interest in what is called "pharmacovigilance" research.
By Lori Cameron
Imagine sitting across from a virtual hologram of a friend who lives thousands of miles away. Now, imagine touching and actually feeling your friend—or at least the digital version. It's not just the stuff of science fiction anymore.
By Lori Cameron
As smart cities fast become the norm, experts search for even better ways to fight big-city problems like reducing traffic and pollution. To this end, researchers from the University of Messina have studied how to advance the design and development of smart-mobility services using an open source platform called FIWARE.
By Lori Cameron
Researchers have taken gaming to a whole new level by developing a new bare-hand gesture interface with superior algorithms called ThunderPunch.
By Lori Cameron
While Einstein's famous equation E = MC2 accounts for a lot of powerful forces like gravity, solar power, and nuclear energy, it can't explain singularities—the point at which things become infinitely big or small—like black holes (small) and the Big Bang (big). When it comes to classical space-time, the laws of quantum physics just don't apply. Now, thanks to supercomputers, researchers might be able to reconcile the inconsistencies.
By Lori Cameron
Biometrics are booming—especially ocular and facial scans—but their potential for error and abuse concerns scientists, as well as the person being scanned. Our security, privacy, and freedom are at stake.
By Lori Cameron
Scientists made space exploration history on 12 November 2014 when, for the first time, a space probe landed on a comet. The speeding target was Churyumov-Gerasimenko—a dirty cosmic snowball slightly bigger than Mount Fuji. The space probe was the Philae lander—part of the European Space Agency's Rosetta program. But not everything went as planned.
By Lori Cameron
We all know about cryptography. It's what hackers typically used against you until now. Now meet its twin: steganography. It's the latest way that cybercriminals transmit malicious data, and it involves hiding a document, video, or photograph inside another file that seems legit. Here's how it works.
By Lori Cameron
No one goes to work wanting to throw a monkey wrench into a machine, but that's exactly what chaos engineers do—they create small problems in their software systems and fix them before they become big.
By Lori Cameron
As more and more businesses adopt Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) as part of their digital strategy, they face a choice between multi- or single-tenant cloud platforms.
By Lori Cameron
When it comes to our online activity, artificial intelligence systems that collect, process, and generate our personal data intensify many ongoing problems with consent, such as giving us adequate notice, choice, and options to withdraw from sharing data.
By Lori Cameron
Now that more and more people are doing financial transactions and storing personal data online, service providers are looking at biometrics systems to improve security. However, recent studies show that biometric features can change over time—an effect called "template aging."
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   About the Authors
Michael Martinez, the editor of the Computer Society's Computer.Org website and its social media, has covered technology as well as global events while on the staff at CNN, Tribune Co. (based at the Los Angeles Times), and the Washington Post.
Lori Cameron is a Senior Writer for the IEEE Computer Society and currently writes regular features for Computer magazine, Computing Edge, and the Computing Now and Magazine Roundup websites. For over 20 years, she has been a professor of writing and literature at DeVry University, Long Beach, as well as a free-lance technical writer. Lori received a master of arts in English from the California State Polytechnic University in 1992, and a bachelor of arts in writing from Indiana Wesleyan University in 1988.