Chasing Pixels
Keep up to date on graphics chips, controllers and processors, that are changing the course of the computer graphics (CG) industry.

Recent Articles

By Dr. Jon Peddie
Commodore, developer of the popular PET computer (1977), one of the first microcomputers with bitmapped graphics, acquired Amiga Corporation in 1984. The Commodore Amiga was a low-cost landmark machine when it launched in 1985. It had high color graphics and displayed 4,096 colors simultaneously (using the Amiga Hold-And-Modify (HAM) display…
By Karen Moltenbrey
Did you know there is a Thank God It’s Monday Day? It was January 3. Blue Monday? January 17. No Brainer Day? February 27. National Awkward Moments Day? For many of us, that is nearly every day. Officially, it is March 18—which seems fitting as it comes the day after…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Imagination Technologies has introduced its latest ray tracing IP, the IMG CXT for its flagship B-series GPU IP. The announcement marked the debut of Imagination’s PowerVR Photon ray tracing architecture. Photon, said Imagination, is the industry’s most advanced ray tracing architecture, bringing desktop-quality visuals to mobile and embedded applications. The…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
The chip that changed the world Thanks to pioneering work by TI’s Jack Kilby (see TechWatch), and Fairchild’s Robert Noyce in the mid-1950s, the concept and practice of integrated circuits came to be—the incorporation of multiple transistors in logic gates. in a single device. That led to James Buie at…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Founded by Jack Hsiao Nan Tseng and John J. Gibbons in Newtown, Pennsylvania, Tseng Labs developed a chipset for graphics AIBs for the IBM PC and compatibles from 1983 to December 1997. The company was best-known for the ET3000, s ET4000, and ET6000 VGA-compatible graphics chips. When Microsoft Windows 3.0…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Alphamosaic Ltd was a UK semiconductor company founded by Robert Swann and Steve Barlow in 2000 in Cambridge, UK. The company was a spin-out from Cambridge Consultants, and they developed low-power mobile multimedia processors based on their VideoCore architecture. The VC01 chip centered around a novel 2D DSP architecture for…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Reality Simulation Systems (RSSI) was founded in 1993 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Venture Creations, RPI’s incubator in Troy, NY by Mike Lewis. Lewis was a recent graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His pal and fellow graduate, Stephen (Steve) Morein graduated with him and was the lead designer of the chip.…
By Jon Peddie
As the web becomes more visual, images and other rich media have become a major factor in page load time. According to HTTPArchive, in 2020 images made up as much as 50% of average bytes downloaded by web visitors. 
By Dr. Jon Peddie
The term GPU has been in use since at least the 1980s. Nvidia popularized it in 1999 by marketing the GeForce 256 add-in board (AIB) as the world’s first GPU.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Founded in early 1993, Nvidia set out to revolutionize the PC and console gaming market with 3D. They succeeded beyond even their wildest dreams, but not without a few bumps and bruises. It just made them smarter and stronger.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Yamaha was a developer of video display controllers or processors (VDP) in the late 1980s. The company made IBM compatible CGA display controllers such as the YGY603.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Intel has a long history in PC graphics chips and in late 2020 announced a new discrete GPU (dGPU), the Xe Max. The company has taken several runs building a discrete graphics chip to take on the market leader but has had a challenging time. They never seemed to address building a dGPU with the same seriousness and resources as the CPU.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
In 1997 3Dlabs developed its Glint Gamma processor, the first programmable transform and lighting (T&L) engine for its Glint workstation graphics chips and even coining the terms GPU—geometry processor unit, before Nvidia announced its graphics processor unit (GPU).
By Dr. Jon Peddie
In SLI mode, two Voodoo2 add-in-boards (AIBs) could run in parallel, with each one drawing every other line of the display.  The original Voodoo Graphics also had SLI capability but was only used in the arcade and professional markets.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Although not really a graphics chip in that it directly manipulated any pixels, the Geometry Engine introduced in 1981 was a breakthrough in VLSI of critical mathematics functions used for graphics.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
In 1989 S3 was founded and began development of a 2D graphics controller. In 1991 the company introduced it S3 911 chip, as a Windows (or GUI) accelerator. The company did very well and introduced a string of 2D controllers.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
In the fall of 1995, ATI announced its first combination of 2D, 3D, and MPEG-1 accelerator chip under the name 3D Rage. The 3D Xpression add-in board (AIB) was based on the 3D Rage graphics chip and featured elemental 3D acceleration, one year behind the pioneer Matrox Millennium PC 3D chip, and at the same time as the S3 Virge.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
The Coronavirus, COVID-19, has forced many of us, maybe most of us to work at home. For many workers, even some working in the tech industry, performing specific tasks at home can be difficult or require a special set up.
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Breakthrough design, genuinely disruptive Silicon Graphics had been a leader and highly respected workstation developer that rose to fame and fortune based on its introduction of a VLSI geometry processor in 1981. In the ensuing years, it developed leading graphics technologies at the high end. A high-end super high-performance workstation…
By Dr. Jon Peddie
Following Moore’s law, integrated graphics have become quite powerful and popular Integrated graphics have been with us since 1991 in the workstation space, and since 1995 in the PC, and earlier than that in workstations. They have now found their way into smartphones, tablets, automobiles, and game consoles. Integrated graphics…
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   About the Author
Dr. Jon Peddie is one of the pioneers of the graphics industry and formed Jon Peddie Research (JPR) to provide customer intimate consulting and market forecasting services where he explores the developments in computer graphics technology to advance economic inclusion and improve resource efficiency.

Recently named one of the most influential analysts, Peddie regularly advises investors in the technology sector. He is an advisor to the U.N., several companies in the computer graphics industry, an advisor to the Siggraph Executive Committee, and in 2018 he was accepted as an ACM Distinguished Speaker. Peddie is a senior and lifetime member of IEEE, and a former chair of the IEEE Super Computer Committee, and the former president of The Siggraph Pioneers. In 2015 he was given the Life Time Achievement award from the CAAD society.
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