Career Watch
Expert guidance and resources on managing your career.

Recent Posts

By Alaina G. Levine
We all face challenges at some points in our careers, whether we have been laid off, need to leave our current position due to either positive or negative stimuli, are looking for a promotion, or are eager to work in a completely different field or profession. But no matter the challenge, scientists and engineers have the competitive advantage to manage, survive and thrive because of your innate problem solving skills. This webinar will address how to manage a career challenge and tackle it using strengths. We will explore options for handling especially challenging situations, like zombie bosses (who steal your work or malign your reputation) or a desire to make a mid-career change, and chart a strategic course to achieve your goa
By Alaina G. Levine
Follow five simple steps this December to improve your professional standing in the new year.
By Alaina G. Levine
Thinking in terms of a limitless series of successes rather than an ultimate goal can lead to unexpected career opportunities.
By Alaina G. Levine
Applying for a job in one country while completing your education and training in another can be challenging, but it CAN be done with success! In this webinar, learn specific strategies to find jobs in another country while you're abroad and how to leverage your networks in-country to access opportunities, especially those that are hidden. Special emphasis is placed on establishing your reputation as a leader in your field with professionals in the country or region in which you wish to work.
By Alaina G. Levine
Setting goals and planning ahead will position you to succeed in 2017.
By Alaina G. Levine
The annual gathering of brilliant minds highlights the importance of networking for career advancement.
By Alaina G. Levine
Venturing outside the world of academics to look for a job is not as daunting as you might think.
By Alaina G. Levine
Effective networking can uncover job openings, forge partnerships, and raise your professional profile.
By Alaina G. Levine
Career consultant Alaina Levine offers practical advice on how to build and use professional networks.
By Alaina G. Levine
The face-to-face interview is only one of the personal interactions that employers consider when they evaluate candidates.
By Alaina G. Levine
It pays to ask for more than an initial job offer contains—even in academia.
By Alaina G. Levine
Career coach Alaina G. Levine offered STEM career networking advice in her recent webinar.
By Alaina G. Levine
Persuasive résumés lead to job interviews. Here's how to write one.
By Alaina G. Levine
If you'll be on the job market this year, now is the time to start your search.
By Alaina G. Levine
The time we spend pursuing outside interests helps us be more productive and creative at work.
By Alaina G. Levine
Helping to run a campus club or other volunteer society provides career-building experience.
By Alaina G. Levine
Employers are increasingly turning to LinkedIn and other social media to identify and assess new hires.
By Alaina G. Levine
Some mistakes in applying for jobs are avoidable. Others provide opportunities to demonstrate your employability.
By Alaina G. Levine
One kind of job interview is not about landing you a position; it's about advancing your career and finding new collaborators.
By Alaina G. Levine
Advice on how to get the most out of your college years.
By Alaina G. Levine
What to do when Voldemort writes you a letter of recommendation (and other scenarios).
By Alaina G. Levine
Expressing gratitude by mail is not a quaint courtesy but an effective way to advance your career.
By Alaina G. Levine
The best career decisions are made when intuition overrules your brain.
By Alaina G. Levine
Making the transition from a career in academia to one in another sector is not as elusive or challenging as one may think. Science and engineering professionals who have spent time in academia have an amazing amount of transferable skills to myriad industries, and decision-makers and hiring-managers know this. The key is being able to articulate your true value in a way that decision-makers can understand (using their language). We will examine how to craft a successful strategy to research, prepare and ultimately transition to a career outside academia, and we will explore how to determine the right careers for your needs, desires and ambitions. And finally, we will keep in mind that even though we may leave academia now, we still can stay connected and collaborative with colleagues in higher education, as we may want to come back in the future. We will discuss tactics to ensuring the door is always open for your return.
By Alaina G. Levine
Effective use of the popular social media service can help you network and advance your career.
By Alaina G. Levine
Recognizing mutual benefits and opportunities will help you get the most out of this more subtle type of job interview.
By Alaina G. Levine
How to recognize, cope with, and escape from various types of toxic coworkers.
By Alaina G. Levine
Preparing a poster presentation offers great opportunity to connect with potential collaborators and employers. Learn how to craft your value statement and talking points, and how to effectively engage those who view your poster. Discover how to leverage the connections you make to develop partnerships, and how to utilize social media to build buzz around you and your research endeavors.
By Alaina G. Levine
Making the transition from a career in academia to one in another sector is not as elusive or challenging as one may think. Science and engineering professionals who have spent time in academia have an amazing amount of transferable skills to myriad industries, and decision-makers and hiring-managers know this. The key is being able to articulate your true value in a way that decision-makers can understand (using their language). We will examine how to craft a successful strategy to research, prepare and ultimately transition to a career outside academia, and we will explore how to determine the right careers for your needs, desires and ambitions. And finally, we will keep in mind that even though we may leave academia now, we still can stay connected and collaborative with colleagues in higher education, as we may want to come back in the future. We will discuss tactics to ensuring the door is always open for your return.
By Alaina G. Levine
There's value in every conference you attend. Learn to identify and extract that value. Discover how to get the most from attending an academic or industry conference, how to behave with speakers, how to meet the most important people, and how to identify the most valuable sessions, events, and other experiences at the conference. Conference etiquette (behavior and dress) and follow-up will also be discussed. You will emerge with surprising tips that will enable you to successfully and actively participate in every conference.
By Alaina G. Levine
Whether you started career planning and job searching a year ago, a month ago or today, there are a few things you can do to get the ball rolling to land a job you enjoy. Number 1: Don’t Panic! It’s never too late to launch a thoughtful strategy designed to land you employment. Number 2: Know you are valuable in myriad industries and ecosystems. In this webinar, originally held April 30, 2015, you will learn specific tasks you can do RIGHT NOW to get a job and advance in your career.
By Alaina G. Levine
Telephone interviews, work experience, and personal goals were among the topics raised in a webinar about careers.
By Alaina G. Levine
Spousal hires, panel interviews, and first impressions were among the topics raised in a recent webinar about careers.
By Alaina G. Levine
When does the interview begin? Much sooner than you think: it starts from the first point of contact you have with someone from the organization. And when does it end? Only when the offer is extended and accepted. In this webinar, originally held on February 4, 2015, learn how to convert conversations and networking into interviews and interviews into job offers. Discover what you need to know and do throughout the interview process to demonstrate your value to the institution and land the job.
By Alaina G. Levine
Learn how to appropriately promote your work and expertise in order to build networks and craft win-win collaborations. Discover how to "work a room," start conversations with people you haven't met before, and obtain information that can set you on a path to a rewarding career. Lastly, gain tips to optimize your conference experience and use social networks to further your professional goals and expand the reach of your discipline.
By Peggy Albright
Internship programs have always given college students special opportunities to accrue on-the-job training while they're still in school. For those pursuing technical degrees in today's competitive markets, the experience can help launch or determine a future career.
By Peggy Albright
Computing professionals who are out-of-the-box thinkers and want to create influential roles within their companies and beyond should consider moving into business development or marketing.
By Peggy Albright
Many computing professionals, at one time or another, consider working at a startup. There's something alluring about the prospect of teaming up with a small group of highly capable, self-driven experts who use cutting-edge technologies to pursue an idea that a traditional business might consider downright crazy.
By Peggy Albright
Many computing professionals, at some point in their careers, consider establishing a consulting business. Consulting offers an opportunity to leave the traditional workplace, work independently, and become your own boss. Specialists in the computing profession are fortunate that the skills they use in their jobs often have real value in a consulting context. And in tough economic times, when employment-based jobs aren't always available or considered secure, it's nice to have the flexibility to pursue a consulting option.
By Peggy Albright
There's no question that it's harder to get a job these days. Just getting your résumé into the hands of a decision-maker is a major challenge, and if you're lucky enough to pull that off, then you've got an interview and—if you're good at interviewing—a round of interviews to prepare for.
By Rachelle Crum
The traditional computer science undergrad or grad-school experience simply isn't an option for students with little flexibility in their schedules or budgets. Instead, some turn to online universities or brick-and-mortar college Web courses to earn their degrees.
By Rachelle Crum
A master's degree in business administration may be the most valuable asset for a computing professional eager to climb the corporate ladder, get back into the workforce faster or keep a startup chugging along.
By Peggy Albright
Human resources executives advised college freshmen to study engineering, computer science, or healthcare rather than marketing or law to avoid being unemployed when they finished their studies. The advice came in a survey of 150 HR executives by global outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas.
By Peggy Albright
The computing field asks a lot of its practitioners. Its professionals must be diligent, naturally curious, good problem solvers, able to grapple with big concepts as well as minutiae and willing to think outside of conventional boundaries to develop new code, architectures and applications that will find value in business and society. Yet in today's competitive and global business environment, computing professionals must add yet another fundamental skill to the mix: the ability to lead and manage people.
By Margo McCall
In normal times, stagnant wages for technology workers would be viewed as bad news. But these aren't normal times. The latest Yoh Index of Technology Wages indicates that pay for tech workers was flat in the fourth quarter of last year, an improvement over the third quarter, when pay declined to levels not seen since 2006. And in the final weeks of 2008, technology wages actually started increasing, driven by gains in the healthcare and telecommunications sectors.
   About the Author
Alaina G. Levine is an award-winning entrepreneur, STEM career consultant, science journalist, professional speaker, and corporate comedian. Her first book, Networking for Nerds (Wiley, 2015), beat out Einstein for the honor of being named one of the Top 5 Books of 2015 by Physics Today Magazine. As President of Quantum Success Solutions, she is a prolific speaker and writer on career development and professional advancement for engineers and scientists. She has delivered over 700 speeches for clients in the US, Europe, Mexico, Canada, and Africa, and has written over 350 articles in international publications such as Nature, Nature Astronomy, NatureJobs, Science, Scientific American, National Geographic News Watch, and IEEE Spectrum. Levine is also currently authoring two online courses for Oxford University Press on career development and entrepreneurship/commercialization and is a consultant, speaker, and writer for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings.
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