IEEE Intelligent Systems

Editorial and Advisory Boards and Staff

Editor in Chief

Daniel Zeng (www.u.arizona.edu/~zeng) is an associate professor and the director of the Intelligent Systems and Decisions Laboratory in the Department of Management Information Systems at the University of Arizona's Eller College of Management. He's an affiliated professor at the Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests include software agents and multiagent systems, complex systems analysis, recommender systems, digital economic institutions, automated negotiation and auction, spatiotemporal-data analysis, security informatics, and infectious-disease informatics. He's the chair of the Informs College on Artificial Intelligence and the Vice President for Technical Activities of the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society. He received his BS in operations research/economics from the University of Science and Technology of China, and his MS and PhD in industrial administration from Carnegie Mellon University.

Editor in Chief Emeritus

Fei-Yue Wang is a research scientist at Chinese Academy of Sciences and a professor at the University of Arizona. He directs the Academy's Key Laboratory of Complex Systems and Intelligence Science and the university's Program for Advanced Research in Complex Systems. His interests include modeling, analysis, and control of complex systems, social computing, parallel management, web and services science, agent-based control (ABC) systems, linguistic dynamic systems (LDS), intelligent control and intelligent spaces, real-time embedded systems, application specific operating systems (ASOS), applications in intelligent transportation systems, intelligent vehicles and telematics, smart appliance/home systems, and network-based automation systems. He was the President of IEEE ITS Society from 2005 to 2007, the President of Chinese Association for Science and Technology (CAST, USA) in 2005, and the President of the American Zhu Kezhen Education Foundation from 2007-2008. He's a member of Sigma Xi and an elected Fellow of IEEE, INCOSE, IFAC, ASME, and AAAS. In 2007, He received the National Prize in Natural Sciences of China and was elected as the Outstanding Scientist by ACM for his work in intelligent control and social computing.

Editorial Board

Russ Biagio Altman is an associate professor of genetics & medicine (and of computer science by courtesy) at Stanford University. He also directs the Stanford Center for Biomedical Computation. His primary research interests are in the application of computing technology to basic molecular biological problems of relevance to medicine. He is developing techniques for collaborative scientific computation over the Internet, including novel user interfaces to biological data, particularly for pharmacogenomics. Other work focuses on the analysis of functional microenvironments within macromolecules and the application of nonlinear optimization algorithms for determining the structure and function of biological macromolecules, particularly the bacterial ribosome. He holds an MD from Stanford Medical School, a PhD in medical information sciences from Stanford, and an AB from Harvard College. He has received the US Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Western Society of Clinical Investigation Annual Young Investigator Award, and the Stanford Medical School Graduate Teaching Award. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Medical Informatics. He is a past president and founding board member of the International Society for Computational Biology, an organizer of the annual Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, and an associate editor of Bioinformatics and Briefings in Bioinformatics.

V.R. (Richard) Benjamins is the Director of Technological Strategy at Telefonica R&D. He's also a board member at Intelligent Software Components (iSOCO), which he cofounded in 1999. Previously he was director and board member at iSOCO and led its international positioning as a Semantic Web company. On the basis of his work, iSOCO received the National Award for Computer Science. He has held positions at the Technical University of Madrid, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Sao Paulo, the University of Paris-South, and the Spanish Artificial Intelligence Research Institute in Barcelona. He has published over 100 scientific articles in books, journals, and proceedings, covering areas such as knowledge technologies, artificial intelligence, human-computer studies, knowledge management, the Semantic Web, and technology transfer. He has been the guest editor of several journal special issues and cochair of numerous international workshops and conferences. He serves on many international program committees and advisory boards. He's a member of the editorial board of IEEE Intelligent Systems, Web Semantics (Elsevier), and the International Journal on Semantic Web and Information Systems (Idea Group). He received his PhD in cognitive science/artificial intelligence from the University of Amsterdam in 1993.

Longbing Cao is a professor of information technology at the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, where he is also the founding director of the university's research institute: Advanced Analytics Institute. His main research interests include data science and big data analytics, including data mining and knowledge discovery, machine learning, and recommender systems, as well as behavior informatics, agent mining, multiagent systems, open complex intelligent systems. He has PhDs in intelligent sciences and computing sciences, and has been leading many enterprise projects in advanced analytics, data mining, and behavior study. He is the Chair of IEEE Task Force on Behavior and Social Informatics and on Educational Data Mining.

Silvia Coradeschi is an associate professor at Orebro University's Center for Applied Autonomous Sensor Systems. She's also the director of studies for the university's computer science division and is vice head of the Technology Department. Her main research interest is in establishing the connection (anchoring) between the symbols used to perform abstract reasoning and the physical entities to which these symbols refer. She also works in multiagent systems and cooperative robotics. She's a member of the board of trustees of the RoboCup Federation and was general chair of RoboCup 99. She was also a member of the advisory board for the 2001 International Joint Conference on AI and is vice president of the board of the European Coordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence. She received a master's degree in philosophy from the University of Florence, a master's degree in computer science from the University of Pisa, and her PhD in computer science from Linkoping University.

Ulrich Furbach is a professor of artificial intelligence at the University of Koblenz. His research interests include knowledge management, automated reasoning, multiagent systems, and e-learning. He's cofounder of the spin-off company wizAI (www.wizai.com), which develops knowledge management systems and information extraction tools. He directed the Automated Reasoning Group in Munich from 1987 to 1990 and the Institute for Knowledge Media in Koblenz from 2000 to 2003. He was president of CADE Inc., was speaker of the German AI Society, and is a board member of the European Coordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence. He obtained his Diploma and Habilitation in informatics from the Technical University of Munich and his PhD from the University of Bundeswehr.

Ashok K. Goel is a professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology, director of the school's Design & Intelligence Laboratory, and a codirector of Georgia Tech's Center for Biologically Inspired Design. Goel conducts research into artificial intelligence and cognitive science, with a focus on computational design and computational creativity. Current projects explore analogical reasoning in biologically inspired engineering design, visual reasoning on intelligence tests, and metareasoning in self-adaptive game-playing agents. More recently, he conducted research into learning science and technology, with a focus on learning about complex systems. Current projects include learning about ecological systems in middle school science and about biological systems in interdisciplinary education in biologically inspired design.

James V. Hansen is the Glen Ardis Professor in the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University. His research interests are in data mining, machine learning, and cooperative intelligent agents. He was previously on the faculty at Indiana University and was a senior research scientist at the Battelle Institute. He received his PhD in computer and information systems from the University of Washington, Seattle. He is a member of the ACM, IEEE Computer Society, and Informs. His biography is included in Who's Who in Science and Engineering.

James Hendler is the Tetherless World Senior Constellation Chair at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he directs the Future of Information project and has appointments in the Department of Computer Science and the Cognitive Science Department. He also serves as the associate director of the Web Science Research Initiative headquartered at MIT. He has authored about 200 technical papers in artificial intelligence, the Semantic Web, agent-based computing, and high-performance processing. One of the inventors of the Semantic Web, Hendler received a 1995 Fulbright Foundation Fellowship, is a former member of the US Air Force Science Advisory Board, and is a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. He's also the former chief scientist of the Information Systems Office at DARPA (the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), he was awarded a US Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Medal in 2002, and he's a member of the World Wide Web Consortium's Semantic Web Coordination Group. He was editor in chief of IEEE Intelligent Systems from 2005 to 2008 and is the first computer scientist to serve on the board of reviewing editors for Science.

Robert R. Hoffman is a senior research scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition and a faculty associate at the University of West Florida's Department of Psychology. He specializes in cognitive systems engineering, expertise studies, cognitive task analysis methodology, and the design of human-centered systems. He's a Fulbright Scholar and a fellow of the American Psychological Society. He's also on the editorial boards of Human Factors and Cognitive Technology and is a series editor for the book series Expertise: Research and Applications. He received his BA, MA, and PhD in experimental psychology from the University of Cincinnati.

Subbarao Kambhampati (Rao) is a professor in Arizona State University's Department of Computer Science and Engineering. His research interests are automated planning (including scheduling and constraint satisfaction problems) and information integration (including query processing, optimization, and metadata learning). He directs ASU's Yochan research group. He was an invited speaker at AAAI 1996 and ICAPS 2003 and has given a couple of well-received tutorials on planning and databases, the most recent ones being on automated planning (AAAI 2000) and information integration on the Web (AAAI 2002). He received his bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and his MS and PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park. He received a 1994 National Science Foundation young investigator award, and his PhD dissertation received the ACM Samuel Alexander award.

Ee-Peng Lim is a professor in the School of Information Systems at Singapore Management University and director of the Knowledge Discovery Systems Lab there. His research interests include information integration, data/text/Web mining, and digital libraries. He is an editor of ACM Transactions on Information Systems , Journal of Web Engineering , International Journal of Digital Libraries , and International Journal of Data Warehousing and Mining . He is a also member of the ACM Publications Board and a member of the steering committees of the International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries and the Pacific Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. He received his PhD from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Sean Luke is an associate professor in George Mason University's Department of Computer Science and is codirector of the university's Evolutionary Computation Laboratory. His research interests include evolutionary computation and stochastic search, machine learning of neural networks and finite-state automata, coevolution, multiagent simulation, and swarm robotics. He received his BS in computer science from Brigham Young University and his PhD in computer science (artificial intelligence) from the University of Maryland at College Park. Sean serves on the boards of Evolutionary Computation and of Genetic Programming and Evolvable Machines and is the author of the ECJ evolutionary computation system and the MASON multiagent simulation toolkit.

Wenji Mao is associate professor in the Institute of Automation at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. She has published in multiple IEEE, ACM, and AAAI journals and conference proceedings. She cochaired the First and Second International Workshops on Social Computing (SOCO 08-09) and has served on the program committees of major international conferences and workshops on social computing, intelligent agents, and security informatics. She received her MS from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (with honors) and her PhD in computer science from the University of Southern California (with honors).

Enrico Motta is a professor of knowledge technologies and the director of the Knowledge Media Institute (KMi) at the Open University in the UK. KMi is a 60-people strong R&D center specializing in Web, multimedia, and knowledge technologies. His main research area is knowledge technologies, where he has about 90 publications on topics such as Semantic Web services, ontologies, knowledge engineering, knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing and reuse, and knowledge management. His current research focuses on Semantic Web technologies---especially Semantic Web services and the application of Semantic Web technologies to knowledge management. Over the years, he has led KMi's contribution to numerous high-profile projects, such as the EPSRC-funded Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration on Advanced Knowledge Technologies (AKT) (www.aktors.org). He's a member of several strategic bodies overseeing Semantic Web initiatives, including the executive board of the OntoWeb Thematic Network and the joint US/EU Semantic Web Services Initiative Architecture Committee (www.daml.org/services/swsa). Besides IEEE Intelligent Systems, he is on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies and Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web. He has written Reusable Components for Knowledge Modelling, published by IOS Press (http://kmi.open.ac.uk/people/motta/book). He has a 1st Degree in computer science from the University of Pisa and a PhD in artificial intelligence from the Open University.

Natasha Noy is a senior research scientist at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research. Her research interests are ontology design, ontology management, semantic integration, ontology evolution, knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and evaluation of knowledge-based systems. She's an associate editor of the Applied Ontology Journal and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Web Semantics and the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies. She received her master's in computer science from Boston University and her PhD in computer science from Northeastern University. She was a program cochair of the 6th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 07) and has been on the program committees and senior program committees for numerous international conferences. She was a member of the W3C Semantic Web Best Practices Working Group from 2004 to 2006. She's a member of the AAAI.

Lynne Parker is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Tennessee, where she's also the director of the Distributed Intelligence Laboratory. She has a joint appointment as an Adjunct Distinguished Research and Development Staff Member at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. She has authored over 70 technical publications in the areas of distributed mobile robotics, human-robot cooperation, robotic learning, and robot navigation. These publications include four edited books on distributed robotics. She received a US Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, a US Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Scientist Award, and a UT-Battelle Technical Achievement Award for Significant Research Accomplishments. Besides serving on the IEEE Intelligent Systems editorial board, she serves on the editorial board of IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation and on a National Research Council scientific advisory panel for the Army Research Laboratory. She received her PhD in computer science from MIT, performing research in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She's a member of the IEEE, the AAAI, the ACM, and Sigma Xi.

Terry Payne is a lecturer in the University of Southampton's Intelligence, Agents, Multimedia Group. He received his PhD in AI from the University of Aberdeen and, while at Carnegie Mellon University, was an active member of the Darpa-funded DAML Services coalition. His work has focused on exploring Semantic Web services, semantics for service discovery, and the role of agents in the Semantic Web. He has published over 80 papers and articles on this work, and he won the Semantic Web challenge at the First Semantic Web Working Symposium in 2001. He's on several program committees for various agents, services, and Semantic Web conferences; he chaired the 2003 AAAI Spring Symposium on Semantic Web Services and cochaired the 2005 AAAI Fall Symposium on Agents and the Semantic Web. He coauthored the W3C OWL-S Service Description Language Recommendation note, is a member of the International Joint Semantic Web Services Consortium (SWSC) Language Committee, and co-coordinated AgentLink III, an EU-funded coordination action project for agent-based computing (www.agentlink.org).

Raymond Perrault is director of the Artificial Intelligence Center at SRI International. From 2002 to 2009 he was coprincipal investigator of the CALO Project, a large, multi-institutional, DARPA-funded project whose objective was to build an intelligent office assistant that learns through interaction with its users and the world. The CALO project management team won the Darpa Award for Excellence by a Performer in 2007. He has been coeditor in chief of Artificial Intelligence since 2002 and a founding fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence.

Alun Preece is Professor of Knowledge and Information Systems in the School of Computer Science at Cardiff University. His main research interests are distributed knowledge-based systems, software agents, and industrial knowledge management. He's a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the British Computer Society Specialist Group on Artificial Intelligence, and serves on the editorial boards of the Knowledge Engineering Review and Knowledge and Information Systems. He received his BSc in computer science and his PhD from the University of Wales.

David Skillicorn is a professor in the School of Computing at Queen's University, where he heads the Smart Information Management Laboratory, and an adjunct professor at the Royal Military College of Canada. He also coordinates the interdisciplinary Research in Information Security center in Kingston, UK. His research interests are in data mining, particularly for counterterrorism and fraud, and he has also worked extensively in parallel and distributed computing. His PhD is from the University of Manitoba.

Alessandro Sperduti is a full professor of computer science in the Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics at the University of Padova since 2002. Previously, he was an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Pisa. His research interests include supervised and unsupervised neural network models for processing structured information (sequences, trees, graphs), kernel methods, and data and process mining methods and applications. He is also interested in intelligent systems for processing of textual documents and images. He is the author of more than 130 publications in refereed journals, conferences, and book chapters, and has been involved as a participant or local chair in several national and international scientific projects. He won the 2000 AI*IA (Italian Association for Artificial Intelligence) "MARCO SOMALVICO" Young Researcher Award.

Ronald L. Yager is director of the Machine Intelligence Institute and professor of Information and Decision Technologies at Iona College. He is also a research associate at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his undergraduate degree from the City College of New York and his PhD from the Polytechnic University of New York. He is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Intelligent Systems and a fellow of the IEEE and the New York Academy of Sciences.

Qiang Yang is a faculty member in the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology's Department of Computer Science. His research interests are AI planning, machine learning, case-based reasoning, and data mining. From 1989 to 2001, he was a faculty member at the University of Waterloo and Simon Fraser University. He received his bachelor's degree from Peking University in 1982 and his PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1989. He has published two books and over 100 research articles in conferences and journals. He's a senior member of the IEEE.

Junping Zhang is an associate professor at Fudan University's School of Computer Science. His research interests include machine learning, image processing, biometric authentication, and intelligent transportation systems. He is the principal investigator in several major Chinese research projects. He's a member of the IEEE Computer Society and IEEE Communication Society. He received his PhD in intelligent systems and pattern recognition from the Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Hai Zhuge is a professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Computing Technology. He's also the chief scientist and the former director of the academy's Key Lab of Intelligent Information Processing. He's the chief scientist of the China National Semantic Grid Research Project and the founder of the China Knowledge Grid Research Group. His research interests include the Knowledge Grid, the Web Resource Space Model, the Semantic Link Network, and knowledge flow. He's an associate editor of Future Generation Computer Systems. He's also the author of The Knowledge Grid (World Scientific, 2004) and The Web Resource Space Model (Springer, 2007). He was the top scholar in systems and software engineering during 2000 to 2004, according to a Journal of Systems and Software assessment report. He received the 2007 Innovation Award from the China Computer Federation for his fundamental theory of the Knowledge Grid. He's a senior member of the IEEE.

Chengqing Zong is the deputy director and a professor in natural language processing at the National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition. His research interests include machine translation, natural language parsing, and human-computer dialogue systems. He has four national patents of China. He is an executive member of the Asian Federation of Natural Language Processing and is a member of the editorial boards of the International Journal of Chinese Language and Computing  and the Journal of Intelligent Technology  (in Chinese). He is a director member of the Chinese Association of Artificial Intelligence and the Society of Chinese Information Processing.. He received his PhD from the Institute of Computing Technology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Advisory Board

James Hendler, the advisory board chair, is the Tetherless World Senior Constellation Chair at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he directs the Future of Information project and has appointments in the Department of Computer Science and the Cognitive Science Department. He also serves as the associate director of the Web Science Research Initiative headquartered at MIT. He has authored about 200 technical papers in artificial intelligence, the Semantic Web, agent-based computing, and high-performance processing. One of the inventors of the Semantic Web, Hendler received a 1995 Fulbright Foundation Fellowship, is a former member of the US Air Force Science Advisory Board, and is a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. He's also the former chief scientist of the Information Systems Office at DARPA (the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), he was awarded a US Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Medal in 2002, and he's a member of the World Wide Web Consortium's Semantic Web Coordination Group. He's the editor in chief of IEEE Intelligent Systems and the first computer scientist to serve on the board of reviewing editors for Science.

Richard J. Doyle manages the Information Technology Program Office at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is the volunteer editor for the AI in Space department of IEEE Intelligent Systems. He served as a member of the Executive Council of the AAAI from 2000 to 2003. He has received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He received his BA in mathematics with a minor in astronomy from Boston University, his SM in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his PhD in computer science from the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab. He gave the invited talk "The Emergence of Spacecraft Autonomy" at the 1997 National Conference on Artificial Intelligence. He was the US Program Chair for the 1997, 1999, and 2003 International Symposium on Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Automation for Space (i-SAIRAS).

Dieter A. Fensel is the scientific director of the Digital Enterprise Research Institutes at both the University of Innsbruck and the National University of Ireland, Galway. His research interests are knowledge engineering, intelligent information integration, and e-commerce. He is the author of The Knowledge Acquisition and Representation Language Karl (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995) and Problem-Solving Methods: Understanding, Description, Development and Reuse (Springer-Verlag, 2000), and is on the editorial board of Knowledge and Information Systems: An International Journal. He received his Diploma in sociology from the Free University of Berlin, his Diploma in computer science from the Technical University of Berlin, and his PhD and his Habilitation in applied computer science from the University of Karlsruhe.

C. Lee Giles is the David Reese Professor of Information Sciences and Technology, a professor of computer science and engineering, and the associate director of research at the eBusiness Research Center at Penn State University. He is also a consulting research scientist in computer science at the NEC Research Institute, in Princeton, N.J., and an adjunct professor in computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania. He is on the scientific advisory boards of FAST Search and Transfer and KXEN. His research interests are in data mining for Web and internet computing, computational models of e-business, intelligent information processing, and fundamental models of intelligent systems and agents. He is known for his work on search engines and the development of the computer science search engine ResearchIndex. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the AAAI, ACM, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. His was previously program manager for the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. His graduate degrees are from the University of Michigan and University of Arizona.

Haym Hirsh is a professor and the chair of computer science at Rutgers University. His research interests include machine learning and intelligent information access. He earned his BS in mathematics and computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his MS and PhD in computer science from Stanford University.

Eric Horvitz is a senior researcher and research area manager at Microsoft Research. His interests center on principles of sensing, reasoning, and action under uncertainty and scarce computational resources. Beyond theoretical challenges, he pursues real-world applications of computational intelligence, with efforts in perception, diagnosis, learning, information retrieval, communications, and human-computer interaction. He has been elected a councilor and fellow of the AAAI and is president-elect of the organization. He serves as an associate editor of the Journal of the ACM and is a member of the Naval Research Advisory Committee. He received his BA in biophysics from Binghamton University and his MD and PhD in medical informatics from Stanford University.

Robert Laddaga is a research scientist in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. His research interests include self-adaptive software, intelligent systems and software, software development tools, perceptually enabled environments, and semantically based collaboration. He has a BS in mathematics and an MA in philosophy from the University of South Carolina and a PhD in philosophy from Stanford. More information is available at www.ai.mit.edu/people/rladdaga.

Richard H. Lathrop is a professor and the director of the Honors Program at the University of California, Irvine's Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. He is a member of the Artificial Intelligence, Biomedical Informatics, and Biomedical Engineering research groups. His research concentrates on intelligent systems for molecular biology and nanotechnology. He received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Reed College and his SM in computer science, his EE, and his PhD in artificial intelligence from MIT. Besides serving on the IEEE Intelligent Systems editorial board, he serves on the editorial board of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, has served on the scientific advisory boards of GeneFormatics, CombiChem (now Dupont Research Labs), and the University of Colorado at Denver Center for Computational Biology, and was the founding treasurer and a member of the founding board of directors of the International Society for Computational Biology. He was a cofounding scientist of Arris Pharmaceutical (now Celera Pharmaceuticals) and coinventor of US Patent No. 5,526,281 ("Machine Learning Approach to Modeling Biological Activity for Molecular Design and to Modeling Other Characteristics"). His cover illustration for the Spring 1999 AI Magazine depicted an intelligent system for drug-resistant HIV, and his research also has appeared on the covers of the Journal of Molecular Biology and the Communications of the ACM. He proved that protein threading is NP-complete and that the halting problem is formally learnable. He has been awarded an Innovative Application Award by the AAAI, Best Paper Awards by the Genome Informatics Conference and the Design Automation Conference, and an Excellence in Teaching Award by the University of California, Irvine, and has been a keynote speaker at the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology Conference and an invited speaker at the Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference. He is a Life Member of the AAAI.

Peter Norvig is the Director of Machine Learning, Search Quality, and Research at Google. Previously, he was the senior computer scientist at NASA and head of the Ames Research Center's Computational Sciences Division. Before that he was Chief Scientist at Junglee, Chief Designer at Harlequin, and Senior Scientist at Sun Microsystems Laboratories. He has also been a professor at the University of Southern California and a research faculty member at the University of California at Berkeley. He received his BS in applied mathematics from Brown University and his PhD in computer science from UC Berkeley. He's a fellow of the AAAI and coauthor of Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. He has over 50 publications in various areas of computer science, concentrating on artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and software engineering, including Paradigms of AI Programming: Case Studies in Common Lisp, Verbmobil: A Translation System for Face-to-Face Dialog, and Intelligent Help Systems for UNIX.

Daniel E. O'Leary is a professor at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. He was the editor in chief of IEEE Intelligent Systems (and its predecessor IEEE Expert) from 1997 until 2001. Dan has served as the program chair and general chair of the IEEE Conference on Artificial Intelligence Applications. He has also served as the chair of a number of AAAI Workshops. He received his BS from Bowling Green State University (Ohio), his master's from the University of Michigan, and his PhD from Case Western Reserve University. He is a member of the AAAI, ACM, and IEEE.

Nigel Shadbolt is a professor of artificial intelligence at the University of Southampton's School of Electronics and Computer Science. He's a member of the Intelligence, Agents, and Multimedia Group, the head of the BIO@ECS Group, and the director of interdisciplinary research within ECS. His research concentrates on two ends of the AI spectrum — namely, knowledge technologies and biorobotics. He's the director of a UK-funded six-year, multimillion-dollar research program that's pursuing basic and applied research in the provision of technologies to support knowledge management and realize the promise of the Semantic Web. In addition to being Editor in Chief Emeritus of IEEE Intelligent Systems, he's on the editorial boards of the Knowledge Engineering Review and the Computer Journal. He has published some 190 articles on various facets of AI and has written and coedited five books. In 1992 he cofounded Epistemics Ltd., a company specializing in knowledge engineering and knowledge management.

Rudi Studer is a full professor of applied informatics at the University of Karlsruhe's Institute AIFB (Institute of Applied Informatics and Formal Description Methods, www.aifb.uni-karlsruhe.de/WBS). His research interests include knowledge management, Semantic Web technologies and applications, Web services, ontology engineering, and knowledge discovery. He also leads the Knowledge Management Group at the University of Karlsruhe's FZI Research Center for Information Technologies (www.fzi.de) and is cofounder of the spin-off company ontoprise (www.ontoprise.de), which develops Semantic Web technologies. He obtained his Diploma in informatics, his Doctor's degree in mathematics and informatics, and his Habilitation in informatics, all from the University of Stuttgart. From 1977 to 1985 he worked as a research scientist at the University of Stuttgart. From 1985 to 1989 he was a project leader and manager at IBM Germany's Scientific Center. He's a member of the AAAI, ACM, IEEE, IFIP Working Group on Databases, and German Informatics Society. He's also the founding president of the Semantic Web Science Association (www.iswsa.org).

William Swartout is the director of technology for University of Southern California's Institute for Creative Technologies and a research associate professor of computer science at USC. He has been involved in the research and development of artificial intelligence systems for over 25 years. His research interests include intelligent agents, immersive virtual reality, knowledge-based systems, knowledge representation, knowledge acquisition, and natural language generation. He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his PhD and MS in computer science from MIT. He is a fellow of the AAAI, is on the AAAI's Board of Councilors, and is past chair of the ACM's Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence. He has served as program co-chair for national and international conferences on artificial intelligence, including the 8th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI 90) and the Third International Conference on Principles of Knowledge and Reasoning (KR 92).

Austin Tate is the director of the Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute and holds the Personal Chair in Knowledge-Based Systems at the University of Edinburgh. As well as engaging in the research, development, and application of knowledge-based methods and planning, he has a background in databases and software engineering. He graduated in computer studies from the University of Lancaster and received his PhD in machine intelligence at the University of Edinburgh. He's a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE), the British Computer Society, the AAAI, and the European Coordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence. He's involved in international knowledge systems, process, and Web services standards activities. His O-Plan and I-X research is supported by the DARPA and the US Air Force Research Laboratory.

Department Editors

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