Prof. Claude Y Laporte, ENG., PhD

Department of Software and IT Engineering
Ecole de technologie superieure
1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest
Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3
CANADA
Phone:    +1 514 396-8656
Fax:    +1 514 396-8684
Email:  Claude.Y.Laporte@etsmtl.ca
URL: http://www.logti.etsmtl.ca/profs/claporte


DVP term expires December 2013

Claude Y Laporte is a Professor at the Ecole de technologie superieure (ETS) an engineering school of the Université du Quebec network of institutions. He teaches graduate and undergraduate software engineering courses. He received a Master in Applied Sciences from the Electrical and Computer Engineering department of �cole Polytechnique de Montréal. He received a Master in Physics (computerized instrumentation) from the Université de Montreal and a Ph.D from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale (France).

Between 1978 and 1991, he was professor at the Royal Military College (Saint-Jean), a Military university of the Department of National Defence. He was tasked in 1988, as a project manager, to lead the development of a graduate program in software engineering for the Department of National Defence. In 1989, he instigated the development of a software engineering center modeled on the Software Engineering Institute. This lead to the establishment of the Applied Software Engineering Center (ASEC) of the Computer Research Institute of Montreal (CRIM).

From 1992 to 1999, he worked at Oerlikon Contraves as a senior analyst responsible to coordinate the development and deployment of software and systems engineering processes and management processes.
He co-founded and chaired the Montréal Software Process Improvement Network (SPIN). SPINs are sponsored by the Software Engineering Institute. His interests include the development and deployment of software and systems engineering processes for very small settings, process assessment, software quality and the management of technological changes.

He is a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Quebec (Professional Association of Engineers of the Province of Québec), IEEE Computer Society (IEEE), the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and the Project Management Institute (PMI).  He has been an invited professor at the Universite de Bretagne Occidentale and at the Chiang Mai University of Thailand.  He is the editor of Working Group 24 of ISO/IEC JTC1-SC7. The working group has been mandated to develop life cycle standards for Very Small Entities (VSEs) developing software. A VSE is an entity (enterprise, organization, department or project) having up to 25 people. He represents the IEEE Computer Society on this working group. He also represents the Standards Council of Canada at Working Group 20 of ISO/IEC JTC1-SC7. This working group has developed an international standard for the certification of software engineering professionals.


The Development and Experimentation of International Standards
for Very Small Entities Involved in Software Development

Very Small Entities (VSEs) are enterprises, organizations, departments or projects having up to 25 people. A large percentage of software entities worldwide are VSEs. In Europe, for instance, 85% of Information Technology (IT) sector companies have up to 10 employees. A survey of the greater Montreal area (Canada) has revealed that 78% of software development enterprises have up to 25 employees and 50% have up to 10 employees. VSEs involved in software development are very important to the world economy, their software components are often integrated in products of their customers. Failure to deliver on time and within budget a quality product threatens the competitiveness of both parties. One way to mitigate these risks is by implementing proven engineering practices.

Many international standards and models like ISO/IEC 12207 (Software Life Cycle Processes) or the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®), from the Software Engineering Institute, have been developed to capture proven engineering practices. However, these standards and models were not designed for VSEs and are consequently difficult to apply in such settings. An ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7  Working Group has been established to address these difficulties by producing standards and guides, the ISO/IEC 29110 set of documents, which are specifically tailored to the characteristics and the needs of VSEs.

The innovation-development process model, developed by Rogers , illustrates the approach used by the ISO working group to develop the standards and guides for VSEs. This presentation will also describe the innovative and proactive approach to the preparation of means to accelerate the diffusion and adoption, by VSEs worldwide, of the standards well ahead of their official publication by ISO.

This presentation also details the formation of a Network of Support Centers for VSEs to accelerate the diffusion and facilitate pilot implementation of this ISO standard. Finally, a series of pilot projects conducted in VSEs, to validate the work of the working group, are discussed.


Teaching Software Quality Assurance
in an Undergraduate Software Engineering Program
Automation or industrial automation is the use of computers to control industrial machinery and processes, replacing human operators. It is a step beyond mechanization, where human operators are provided with machinery to help them in their jobs. The most visible part of automation can be said to be industrial robotics. Industrial automation relies heavily on software quality. Software quality assurance is taught within the Software Engineering undergraduate curriculum at the �cole de technologie supérieure (�TS) in Montréal, Canada. Throughout the course we stress the concept of the cost of quality to convince students of the importance of putting in place adequate prevention and appraisal practices in order to reduce software project costs and failures. The lectures cover a wide spectrum of quality assurance techniques and tools. In addition to weekly 3-hour lectures, the course includes a project in which students have an opportunity to work with industrial software quality assurance techniques and tools.

At ETS software quality assurance is taught in the lecture format within the software engineering undergraduate curriculum. This curriculum is based on the Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK)  . The course stresses the concept of the cost of quality to convince students of the importance of putting in place adequate prevention and appraisal practices in order to reduce software project failures. The lectures cover a wide spectrum of quality assurance techniques and tools. In addition to weekly three-hour lectures, the course includes a project in which students have an opportunity to measure the cost of quality and work with industrial software quality assurance techniques and tools. Universities need to emphasize quality in their programs, but many of them do not. Universities from which practitioners hire could model a software quality course after this one.

This presentation is divided into four parts: First, we present an overview of the undergraduate program in software engineering. Next, they briefly introduce the IEEE Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK) and the SQA knowledge area. Then we present a detailed description of the SQA course. Following that, the current difficulties and future improvements are discussed. Finally, we conclude the presentation by raising issues related to the SQA course and its impact on the students in their professional lives.

Improvement of Software Engineering Performances
An Experience Report at Bombardier Transportation
Total Transit Systems Signalling Group

The performance of the Bombardier TTS/Pittsburgh Signalling group has been evaluated twice.  The first evaluation established a baseline for the evaluation of progress made in the second evaluation.  During those visits, the same evaluation method was used to evaluate project performance and organizational change management, i.e. the people issues.  Since 2003, there has been substantial improvement in both process maturity level and process performance.  This experience report, at Bombardier Transportation, illustrates that process performance improvements are achievable when two key factors are involved, namely: a link between business goals and process improvement activities, and a sponsor committing the right level of resources to the improvement program.  We explain the multi-dimensional methodology used to perform the evaluations, as well as the business goals and the quantitative performance improvements achieved since 2003.

Utilization of a Set of Software Engineering Roles for a Multinational Organization
We present the results of a project conducted to analyze the coverage of the roles within the Bombardier Engineering System Software Engineering process definition and subsequently improve the role definitions. This is the common software engineering process definition of Bombardier’s Transportation division. Role definitions were analyzed using three internationally recognized software engineering reference documents: the Rational Unified Process, IEEE/ISO Standard 12207, and the IEEE Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (also known as the SWEBOK Guide).

We present the application of a set of software engineering roles. Role definitions were developed using internationally recognized software engineering reference documents, such as the IEEE SWEBOK Guide, for a major railway development organization: Bombardier Transportation.  The description of the Software Architect role is explained.  We will also illustrate how the role set could be used for project-specific needs during a typical project planning and launch session.