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  Computer Science & Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award

  Nomination Deadline for 2015 nominations: 15 October 2014
 

  NOMINATE   |  Nomination Questions (pdf) | 2014 Promo Flyer (pdf)

  The award nomination requires a minimum of 3 endorsements.

 A certificate and $2,000 honorarium are awarded for outstanding contributions to undergraduate education  through teaching and service, and for helping to maintain interest in the field and make a statement about the  importance with which the IEEE Computer Society views undergraduate education.

 

 

Past recipients for Computer Science &

Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award

2014 Elizabeth Gerber For her paradigm shifting extracurricular design initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration and learning.
2013 Robert J. Fornaro For outstanding teaching and mentoring of undergraduate students in award-winning engineering projects.
2012 Mark Guzdial For outstanding and sustained excellence in computing education through innovative teaching, mentoring, inventive course development, and knowledge dissemination.
2011 Benjamin Hescott For making computer science accessible to a broad spectrum of students through his energy, enthusiasm, and dedication to teaching.
2009 Judy Robertson For outstanding contributions to the undergraduate education through teaching and the innovative use of pioneering technologies in teaching.
2008 Elizabeth L. Burd For outstanding contributions to the undergraduate education through teaching and the organization of programs to promote excellence in undergraduate teaching.
2007 Darrin M. Hanna For outstanding contributions to the undergraduate education through both teaching and service and for helping maintain interest in undergraduate education in Computer Science and Engineering.
2003 Sally A. Fincher For sustained contributions to undergraduate computer science through rigorous examination of teaching effectiveness and fostering and promoting research in computer science education.
2002 Alan Clements For teaching excellence reflected on textbooks with major impact on computer architecture education and for leadership in the CS International Design Competition, focusing international attention on undergraduate computer systems design.
2001 David G. Meyer For improving design education at the undergraduate level through course and curriculum development and through innovative research in and application of educational delivery technology.
2001 Steven S. Skiena For outstanding contributions to undergraduate education in the areas of algorithms and discrete mathematics and for influential textbook and software.
1999 Timothy J. Long For innovative work in the content and pedagogy of introductory computer science education, linking research advances in software engineering with educational delivery of the material taught in the introductory courses.
1999 Bruce W. Weide For innovative work in the content and pedagogy of introductory computer science education, linking research advances in software engineering with educational delivery of the material taught in the introductory courses.
1999 Joseph L. Zackary For outstanding and sustained contributions to undergraduate computational science and education, including writing innovative textbooks, developing innovative on-line educational materials, and teaching an exemplary introductory scientific programming class.

 


2014 COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING
UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING AWARD SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIR

Robert Reilly
Massachutsetts Institute of Technology

The IEEE-CS Education Committee is currently accepting new nominations for the Computer Science & Engineering Udergraduate Teaching Award.  Nominations are due 15 Oct 2014.

Nomination site

Deadline for 2015 nominations is 15 OCT 2014


Northwestern Professor Liz Gerber Named 2014 Recipient of Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 28 February 2014 – Northwestern University Cordell Breed Junior Professor of Design Liz Gerber has been named the 2014 recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award for her contributions to learning.

Liz Gerber earned her MS and PhD in Product Design and Management Science and Engineering at Stanford. She specializes in design and human-computer interaction, particularly how social computing supports the innovation process. Her current research investigates crowd-funding as a mechanism for reducing disparities in entrepreneurship. Gerber was recognized "for her paradigm-shifting extracurricular design initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration and learning."

Gerber's work funded by the US National Science Foundation and the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance has appeared in peer-reviewed journals, including Transactions on Computer Human InteractionsDesign Studies, and Organization Science

As an award-winning teacher and researcher, Liz has touched the lives of more than 6,000 students through her teaching at Northwestern's Segal Design Institute and Stanford University's Hasso Plattner's Institute of Design and through her paradigm-shifting creation, Design for America, a national network of students using design to tackle social challenges.

In the past five years, Gerber's students have won more than 25 local and national awards for their technical innovations, such as the Dell Social Innovation Award and Federal Health Design Challenge, and they have launched companies to address complex societal problems such as hospital-acquired infections and Type 2 Diabetes. Her students been featured in outlets such as MIT's Technology ReviewThe Chicago TribuneWall Street JournalABC News, and more. 

The Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award comes with a certificate and $2,000 honorarium. The award honors outstanding contributions to undergraduate education through teaching and service, and for help in maintaining interest in the field.

For more information on IEEE Computer Society awards, visithttp://www.computer.org/awards.

About IEEE Computer Society

IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading computing membership organization and the trusted information and career-development source for a global workforce of technology leaders including: professors, researchers, software engineers, IT professionals, employers, and students. The unmatched source for technology information, inspiration, and collaboration, the IEEE Computer Society is the source that computing professionals trust to provide high-quality, state-of-the-art information on an on-demand basis. The Computer Society provides a wide range of forums for top minds to come together, including technical conferencespublications, and a comprehensive digital library, unique training webinarsprofessional training, and the TechLeader Training Partner Program to help organizations increase their staff's technical knowledge and expertise, as well as the personalized information tool myComputer. To find out more about the community for technology leaders, visit http://www.computer.org.

 

Read more about previous CSEU past recipients announcements....

North Carolina State University Professor Robert J. Fornaro Named 2013 Recipient of IEEE Computer Society CS&E Undergraduate Teaching Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 29 April 2013 – Robert J. Fornaro, a professor of computer science  at North Carolina State University (NCSU), has been named the 2013 recipient of the Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award for his mentoring of students in award-winning engineering projects.

Fornaro's teaching and research activities have focused on operating systems, development of application software for wireless sensor systems, and software engineering process. The former director of NCSU's computer science undergraduate program, Fornaro in 1994 co-founded the Senior Design Center, which educates students by assigning real-world software development problems.

He oversaw teams from NCSU in the IEEE Computer Society's International Design Competition (CSIDC) in 2003, 2005, and 2006. Three of the senior design teams advised and mentored by Fornaro went on to win international accolades for their efforts, including two first place finishes and and one third place finish in the Competition.  This was the first and only time in the history of CSIDC that students from any university in the world placed first in the competition in 2 consecutive years.

Fornaro continues to mentor teams of students as they work on their capstone projects. In 2008, Fornaro was recognized as a member of the NCSU Academy of Outstanding Teachers and was chosen as the recipient of an Alumni Outstanding Teacher Award. He has authored or co-authored over 25 refereed journal or conference papers.

In his early years at NCSU, Fornaro worked on research projects involving real-time operating systems and data communications. Applications of these systems ranged from digital terrain mapping for the US Air Force, to high-performance multiprocessor architectures for real-time control in the NCSU Precision Engineering Center. He received his PhD in computer science and master's in mathematics from The Pennsylvania State University.

 

Read more about previous CSEU past recipients announcements....

Mark Guzdial Honored with 2012 Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 24 April, 2012 – Mark Guzdial's innovative teaching methods at Georgia Institute of Technology have won him the IEEE Computer Society 2012 Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Guzdial, a professor in the School of Interactive Computing in the College of Computing, received the award "for outstanding and sustained excellence in computing education through innovative teaching, mentoring, inventive course development, and knowledge dissemination."

The award recognizes outstanding contributions to undergraduate education through both teaching and service. The award is intended to highlight the Computer Society's commitment to undergraduate education, as well as affirm its support for excellence in undergraduate education.

Guzdial is the inventor of the Media Computation approach to learning introductory computing. The approach uses contextualized computing education, where the choice of programming languages, lecture examples, and programming assignment are chosen around a particular application area. The approach has shown success in attracting and retaining students. His Media Computation course has been taught at Georgia Tech since 2003 and has shown to have an impact in retaining students in underrepresented groups, including women and minorities. The Media Computation curriculum is being used at universities across the country.

Guzdial and his students the Contextualized Support for Learning (CSL) lab study how people come to understand computing and how to make that work better. They publish frequently in computing education conferences. Guzdial has published several books (with his wife and colleague, Barbara Ericson) on the use of media as a context for learning computing. He publishes a computing education blog, which averages over 400 pageviews per day.

He received a PhD in education and computer science from the University of Michigan in 1993. He serves on the ACM Education Board and the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education Board, and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Learning Sciences, ACM Transactions on Computing Education, and Communications of the ACM.

Any faculty member in a degree program in computer science, computer engineering, computer information systems, or a similar program is eligible to be nominated. The award consists of a stipend of $2,000, a plaque, and certificate.
 

Read more about previous CSEU past recipients announcements....

Benjamin Hescott of Tufts University Wins Undergrad Teaching Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 3 March, 2011 – Benjamin Hescott, a senior lecturer and research assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Tufts University's School of Engineering has been named the 2011 recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Computer Science and Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award.

The award recognizes outstanding contributions to undergraduate education through both teaching and service. The award is intended to highlight the Computer Society's commitment to undergraduate education, as well as affirm its support for excellence in undergraduate education.

Hescott was recognized "for making computer science accessible to a broad spectrum of students through his energy, enthusiasm, and dedication to teaching." At Tufts, he is credited with helping boost interest in computer science classes through the use of humor, creativity, and intense classroom discussions.

Any faculty member in a degree program in computer science, computer engineering, computer information systems, or a similar program is eligible to be nominated. The award consists of a stipend of $2,000, a plaque, and certificate. The award will be presented at an awards dinner on Wednesday, 25 May in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Hescott's research interests include computational complexity, Kolmorgorov complexity, approximation algorithms, and computational biology. Most recently, within the school's computational biology research group, he is working to discover genetic motifs that represent redundant systems.

Hescott says his favorite place to be is in the classroom. He is continually searching for new tools and analogies to help make computer science and programming accessible to all. His teaching tools include everything from rolls of paper towels to model Turing Machine tapes to nesting Tupperware containers for linked lists. He is currently working on new curricula for the first year sequence of computer science.

Hescott graduated from Boston University with a PhD in computer science in 2008. While at BU, he received the Department Teaching Award. At Tufts, he is the faculty supervisor for the student ACM chapter and serves as liaison to the New England Undergraduate Computer Science Symposium. He is member of the leadership team for Empowering Leadership Alliance, whose main purpose is encouraging, preparing, and retaining underrepresented minorities in computer science.

The 2009 recipient of the Computer Science and Engineering Undergrad Teaching Award was Judy Robertson, a senior lecturer in computer science at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland. Robertson was also the principal investigator of a grant, funded by Britain's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, that provided support to high school teachers in the use of game-making projects with their students. She received her BSc in computer science and artificial intelligence at the University of Edinburgh in 1997 and a PhD in artificial intelligence at the same university in 2001.

 

Read more about previous CSEU past recipients announcements....

Judy Robertson Wins UndergraduateTeaching Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 7 December, 2009 – Scottish computer science professor Judy Robertson has been named the 2009 recipient of the Computer Science and Engineering Undergrad Teaching Award.

Robertson is senior lecturer in computer science at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland. Her research interests include technology-enhanced learning, particularly exploring new and motivating ways to engage learners of all ages with the use of computing concepts. Her recent research has focused on the use of virtual world-building to facilitate the learning process.

Robertson is also the principal investigator of a grant, funded by Britain's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, that provides support to high school teachers in the use of game-making projects with their students. She received her BSc in computer science and artificial intelligence at the University of Edinburgh in 1997 and a PhD in artificial intelligence at the same university in 2001.

Robertson's citation reads: "For outstanding contributions to the undergraduate education through teaching and the innovative use of pioneering technologies in teaching."

Colleagues describe Robertson as an inspiring lecturer who freely shares her experiences, ideas, and knowledge, and embeds her research into her undergraduate teaching. Particularly noted was her ability to mentor, enthuse, and motivate her students so they achieve higher than average results.