Roberto Car & Michele Parrinello

 

2009 Sidney Fernbach Award Joint Recipients
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“For leadership in creating the modern theoretical and practical foundations for modeling the chemistry and physics of materials. The software resulting from this work is one of the enabling tools for materials science modeling.”

 

Roberto Car is the Ralph W. Dornte 31 Professor in Chemistry at Princeton University. He is a fellow of the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science (PCTS), and is affiliated to the Department of Physics, the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), and the Program in Computational and Applied Mathematics (PACM).

He received a doctorate in physics from the Milan Institute of Technology. Before joining Princeton University in 1999, he worked at the University of Milan, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste, and the University of Geneva. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK), a recipient of an honorary doctorate, and was awarded the 2009 Dirac Medal of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, the Raman Prize for Computational Physics from the American Physical Society in 1995, and the Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Solid State Physics from the European Physical Society in 1990. In 2008, he received a Humboldt Foundation research award for senior US scientists.


His research has been focused on understanding the physical and chemical properties of matter in condensed and molecular phases using computational methods based on first-principles microscopic quantum theory.

Presented at SC 2009

 

Professor Parrinello is known for his many technical innovations in the field of atomistic simulations and for a wealth of interdisciplinary applications ranging from materials science to chemistry and biology. Together with Roberto Car he introduced ab-initio molecular dynamics, also known as the Car- Parrinello method, marking the beginning of a new era both in the area of electronic structure calculations and in molecular dynamics simulations. He is also known for the Parrinello-Rahman method, which allows crystalline phase transitions to be studied by molecular dynamics. More recently he has introduced metadynamics for the study of rare events and the calculation of free energies. For his work he has been awarded many prizes and honorary degrees. He is a member of numerous academies and learned societies, including the German Berlin- Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften, the British Royal Society and the Italian Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, which is the major academy in his home country Italy. Born in Messina in 1945, he received his degree from the University of Bologna and is currently professor of Computational Sciences at ETH in Switzerland.

 

Presented at SC 2009