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Taylor L. Booth Education Award

Nomination Deadline: 15 October 2014


NOMINATE
   |  Nomination Questions (pdf)

The award nomination requires a minimum of 2 endorsements.

A bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium are awarded for an outstanding record in computer science and engineering education. The individual must meet two or more of the following criteria in the computer science and engineering field:

  1. Achieving recognition as a teacher of renown.
  2. Writing an influential text.
  3. Leading, inspiring or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field.
  4. Inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

Learn more about Taylor L. Booth

 

 

Past recipients for Taylor L. Booth Education Award

2014 Charles E. Leiserson For worldwide computer science education impact through writing a best-selling algorithms textbook, and developing courses on algorithms and parallel programming.
2013 Nell B. Dale For inspiring hundreds of people to careers in computer science through both her excellent teaching and her award-winning textbooks.
2012 Eric Roberts For contributions to computing education as demonstrated by teaching excellence, education publications, curricula development, and student mentoring.
2011 Wen-Tsuen Chen For contributions to computer science education in Taiwan and worldwide, and for promoting computer networking education at all levels.
2009 Michael T. Heath For contributions to computational science and engineering education, curriculum and scholarship.
2008 James P. Cohoon

Jack W. Davidson

For sustained effort to transform introductory computer science education through lab-based multimedia pedagogy coupled with examples that attract a diverse student body.
2007 Alan Clements For outstanding contributions to education in the field of computer architecture, as demonstrated by teaching, education publications, and dedication to nurturing the future leaders for the computing professions.
2004 Tadao Nakamura For leadership in the reform of advanced information science education and for important and substantive contributions to information science and computer engineering education in Japan.
2003 Eugene H. Spafford For excellence as an educator, and for outstanding contributions to the definition, materials and practice of information security and computing.
2002 Abraham Silbershatz For distinguished contributions in advancing computer science and engineering education through teaching, mentoring, and writing influential textbooks in the operating systems and database systems areas.
2001 James F. Kurose For distinguished contributions in advancing computer science and engineering education through teaching, writing and innovative textbook, curriculum development, and mentoring in the networking area.
2000 Prithviraj Banerjee For outstanding contributions in advancing computer science and engineering education through research, teaching, writing a graduate level textbook, and developing a new computational science and engineering graduate program.
1999 Harold S. Stone For outstanding contributions in advancing computer science and engineering education through your research, teaching and most important through innovative writing of seminal textbooks that established computer architecture on a firm foundation.
1998 Tosiyasu L. Kunii For initiating and promoting computer and information science education in Japan and for your seminal contributions towards the integration of computer-based education in all academic disciplines.
1997 Sartaj K. Sahni For contributions to computer science and engineering education in the areas of data structures, algorithms, and parallel algorithms.
1996 Edward S. Davidson For contributions to the establishment of computer engineering as an academic discipline and for nurturing many leaders of this field during their formative years the profession.
1995 Harold Abelson For continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science, exemplified by the Logo and Scheme languages and their associated methodologies.
1994 David L. Gries For your commitment to education in Computer Science and Engineering as demonstrated by your record of outstanding teaching and mentoring, writing of textbooks, curriculum development and professional.
1993 Melvin A. Breuer For outstanding contributions to the fields of design automation and testing by writing and editing three major tests, developing related curriculum, and the training of future educators and scholars.
1992 C. L. Liu Outstanding contribution to computer science education through curriculum development, preparation of text books, supervision of graduate students, classroom instruction, & participation in accreditation activities.
1991 Edward J. McCluskey Outstanding service as a computer science & engineering educator and for inspiring students and educators alike through his prolific contribution as a teacher, author, curriculum developer & graduate research supervisor.
1990 C. V. Ramamoorthy Outstanding contributions to Computer Science & Engineering education.
1990 Rajiv Ramnath Outstanding contributions to Computer Science & Engineering education.
1989 J. T. (Tom) Cain Outstanding contributions to Computer Science & Engineering education.

 

 

2014 TAYLOR BOOTH SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIR

Robert Reilly
Massachutsetts Institute of Technology

 

Nomination site

Deadline for 2015 nominations is 15 OCT 2014

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Charles E. Leiserson Named 2014 Recipient of IEEE Computer Society Taylor L. Booth Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 25 February 2014 – Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor of computer science and engineering Charles E. Leiserson has been named 2014 recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Taylor L. Booth Award for his contributions to computer science education.

An MIT professor since 1981 and the coauthor of the textbook, "Introduction to Algorithms," one of computer science's most cited publications, Leiserson was recognized "for worldwide computer science education impact through writing a best-selling algorithms textbook and developing courses on algorithms and parallel programming."

The creator of MIT undergraduate courses on algorithms and on discrete mathematics for computer science, he headed the computer-science program for the pioneering Singapore-MIT Alliance and developed MIT's undergraduate class on software performance engineering, which teaches parallel programming as one of several techniques for writing fast code. 

His annual workshop on Leadership Skills for Engineering and Science Faculty has educated hundreds of faculty at MIT and around the world in the human issues involved in leading technical teams in academia. He was the founding Workshop Chair for the MIT Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program (UPOP), which teaches MIT Engineering sophomores how leadership skills can leverage their technical skills in professional environments. He is a Margaret MacVicar Faculty Fellow at MIT, the highest recognition at MIT for undergraduate teaching. 

Leiserson joined the MIT faculty in 1981, where he heads the Supertech research group in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He received a BS from Yale University in 1975 and a PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 1981.

Leiserson's research centers on the theory of parallel computing, especially as it relates to engineering reality. His PhD thesis, "Area-Efficient VLSI Computation," won the first ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award, as well as the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation's Doctoral Thesis Award.

He coauthored the first paper on systolic architectures, invented the retiming method of digital-circuit optimization, and developed the algorithmic theory behind it.  On leave from MIT at Thinking Machines Corp., he designed and led the implementation of the network architecture for the Connection Machine Model CM-5 Supercomputer, which incorporated the fat-tree interconnection network he developed at MIT. He developed the Cilk multithreaded programming technology, and led the development of several Cilk-based parallel chess-playing programs, winning numerous prizes in international competition. On leave from MIT as Director of System Architecture at Akamai Technologies, he led the engineering team that developed a worldwide content-distribution network numbering over 20,000 servers. He founded Cilk Arts, Inc., which developed the Cilk++ multicore concurrency platform and was acquired by Intel in 2009. 

He is an ACM Fellow, an AAAS Fellow, and a Senior Member of IEEE and SIAM. 

The Taylor L. Booth award commemorates outstanding records in computer science and engineering education. Accompanied by a bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium, the award recognizes achievement as a teacher of renown through writing an influential text; leading, inspiring, or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field; or inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

The award is named after Taylor L. Booth, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Connecticut who was instrumental in defining computer science and engineering curricula for program accreditation. His name was on the ballot as a candidate for president-elect of the Computer Society when he died of a heart attack in 1986.

For more information on IEEE Computer Society awards, visithttp://www.computer.org/awards.

About IEEE Computer Society

IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading computing membership organization and the trusted information and career-development source for a global workforce of technology leaders including: professors, researchers, software engineers, IT professionals, employers, and students. The unmatched source for technology information, inspiration, and collaboration, the IEEE Computer Society is the source that computing professionals trust to provide high-quality, state-of-the-art information on an on-demand basis. The Computer Society provides a wide range of forums for top minds to come together, including technical conferencespublications, and a comprehensive digital library, unique training webinarsprofessional training, and the TechLeader Training Partner Program to help organizations increase their staff's technical knowledge and expertise, as well as the personalized information tool myComputer. To find out more about the community for technology leaders, visit http://www.computer.org.

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ARCHIVED TAYLOR BOOTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Nell B. Dale Named 2013 Recipient of IEEE Computer Society Taylor L. Booth Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 25 March 2013 – Nell B. Dale, one of the first women to earn a doctorate in computer science, was named the 2013 recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Taylor L. Booth Award for her contributions to computer science education.

Dale graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and remained on the faculty until her 2000 retirement from full-time teaching. During her career, Dale authored or co-authored 18 textbooks, focusing on problem solving, programming, and data structures using Pascal, C++, and Java as the vehicles for implementation.

She was originator and director of the Women in Science Program in the early '80s and has been a mentor to students and colleagues throughout her career.

The Taylor L. Booth award commemorates outstanding records in computer science and engineering education. Accompanied by a bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium, the award recognizes achievement as a teacher of renown through writing an influential text; leading, inspiring, or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field; or inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

Dale's research interests have focused on computer science education as an academic discipline. She co-chaired five dissertations in the area and was content representative on five additional dissertations in CS Education. Dale was active in the ACM Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education (SIGCSE), serving as SIG chair and  conference chair for two SIGCSE Technical Symposia, and writing the Research in Computing Education Column in the SIGCSE Bulletin from 1998 to 2002.

She was the recipient of the SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contributions to Computer Science Education and was the first woman to receive ACM's Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award. She won two Hamilton Awards for the best textbook published at UT in a given year, received the ABACUS Award from the Upsilon Pi Epsilon Honor Society for the Computing Sciences, and was elected an ACM Fellow. She received a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from Sewanee, The University of the South.

The award is named after Taylor L. Booth, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Connecticut, his alma mater, and director of the university's Computer Applications and Research Center. His name was on the ballot as a candidate for president-elect of the Computer Society when he died of a heart attack on October 20, 1986.

Active in the Computer Society for more than 16 years, particularly in its educational activities, Booth was instrumental in defining computer science and engineering curricula for program accreditation through the society's and IEEE's respective board. He also worked for closer cooperation between ACM and the IEEE Computer Society, served as a member of the Board of Governors, chaired the society's Constitution and Bylaws Committee, and held positions as first vice president, secretary, and vice president for educational activities.

For more information on IEEE Computer Society awards, visit http://www.computer.org/awards.

 

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ARCHIVED TAYLOR BOOTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Eric Roberts Wins IEEE Computer Society's 2012 Taylor L. Booth Education Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 30 April, 2012 – Stanford University Computer Science Professor Eric Roberts has been named the recipient of the 2012 Taylor L. Booth Education Award.

Roberts, who is a Stanford Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, received the honor "for contributions to computing education as demonstrated by teaching excellence, education publications, curricula development, and student mentoring."

The Taylor L. Booth award commemorates outstanding records in computer science and engineering education. Accompanied by a bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium, the award recognizes achievement as a teacher of renown through writing an influential text; leading, inspiring, or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field; or inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

Roberts holds a PhD in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. He taught at Wellesley College from 1980-85, where he chaired the Computer Science Department. From 1985 to 1990, he was a member of the research staff at Digital Equipment Corp.'s Systems Research Center in Palo Alto, California, where his research focused on programming tools for multiprocessor architectures.

Roberts joined the Stanford faculty in 1990. From 1990 to 2002, Professor Roberts was Associate Chair and Director of Undergraduate Studies for Computer Science. In that capacity, he was the principal architect of Stanford's introductory programming sequence.

Roberts has authored five computer science textbooks that are used at many colleges and universities throughout the world. His current research focuses on computer science education, particularly for underserved communities.
From 1998 to 2005, Roberts directed the Bermuda Project, which developed the computer science curriculum for Bermuda's public secondary schools.

At Stanford, Professor Roberts has received several teaching awards, including the Bing Fellowship, the Dinkelspiel Award, and the Hoagland Prize. In 2003, Roberts received the SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education.

Roberts has been active in professional organizations dedicated to computer science education. He is past chair of the Education Board of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). From 1998 to 2001, Roberts served as co-chair and principal editor for the ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula 2001, which published a detailed set of curriculum guidelines in December 2001.

Roberts has also been active in organizations seeking to promote socially responsible use of science and technology, including Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility and Student Pugwash USA. In 2000, Roberts was the Eugene M. Lang Visiting Professor for Social Change at Swarthmore College.

The award is named after Taylor L. Booth, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Connecticut, his alma mater, and director of the university's Computer Applications and Research Center. His name was on the ballot as a candidate for president-elect of the Computer Society when he died of a heart attack on October 20, 1986.

Active in the Computer Society for more than 16 years, particularly in its educational activities, Booth was instrumental in defining computer science and engineering curricula for program accreditation through the society's and IEEE's respective board. He also worked for closer cooperation between the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE Computer Society, served as a member of the Board of Governors, chaired the society's Constitution and Bylaws Committee, and held positions as first vice president, secretary, and vice president for educational activities.
 

ARCHIVED TAYLOR BOOTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Wen-Tsuen Chen Wins 2011 Taylor L. Booth Education Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 25 February, 2011 – Wen-Tsuen Chen, a Distinguished Chair in National Tsing Hua University's Department of Computer Science, has been named the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society's 2011 Taylor L. Booth Education Award.

The Taylor L. Booth award commemorates outstanding records in computer science and engineering education. Accompanied by a bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium, the award recognizes achievement as a teacher of renown through writing an influential text; leading, inspiring, or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field; or inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

Chen received the award "for contributions to computer science education in Taiwan and worldwide, and for promoting computer networking education at all levels." For more information on IEEE Computer Society awards, visit http://www.computer.org/awards.

Chen has served as department chairman, college dean, and university president. He received his BSc (1970) in nuclear engineering from National Tsing Hua University, and his MSc (1973) and PhD (1976) in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California at Berkeley.

Chen joined National Tsing Hua University in 1976, before establishment of Taiwan's information and communication technologies industry, and since then has contributed to its development into a worldwide ICT center.

Chen helped found the Department of Computer Science of the National Tsing Hua University and founded the College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the university. He has vastly expanded the capacity of the university in educating young talents for the ICT industries in Taiwan and worldwide.

In 1988, Chen began a four-year stint as a science and technology advisor to the Ministry of Education and helped establish the Taiwan Academic Network (TANet), the first Internet in Taiwan.

From 1992 to 1996, he served as director of the Advisory Office of Ministry of Education. He helped improve the information infrastructure of K-12 schools and initiated the computer systems, communications, and VLSI design education programs that significantly improved research infrastructure and teaching programs in universities to cultivate talents for the expanding ICT industries in Taiwan.

Chen was elected an IEEE Fellow in 1994 and received the Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Computer Society for his research accomplishments in computer networking and parallel processing in 1999. He is a Lifelong National Chair of the Ministry of Education, Taiwan.

ARCHIVED TAYLOR BOOTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Michael Heath Wins Booth Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 7 December, 2009 – Michael T. Heath, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Fulton Watson Copp Chair in computer science, has been named the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society's 2009 Taylor L. Booth Education Award.

The Taylor L. Booth award commemorates outstanding records in computer science and engineering education. Accompanied by a bronze medal and $5,000 honorarium, the award recognizes achievement as a teacher of renown through writing an influential text; leading, inspiring, or providing significant education content during the creation of a curriculum in the field; or inspiring others to a career in computer science and engineering education.

Heath's commendation reads: "For contributions to computational science and engineering education, curriculum and scholarship."

Besides serving as Fulton Watson Copp Chair in UIUC's Department of Computer Science, Heath is director of both the Computational Science and Engineering Program and the Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets. Heath is also the interim head of the Computer Science department through the end of 2009, a position he has held since August 2007.

Heath received a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Kentucky, an M.S. in mathematics from the University of Tennessee, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University.

Before joining the University of Illinois in 1991, he spent a number of years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His research interests are in numerical analysis—particularly numerical linear algebra and optimization—and in parallel computing.

He has been an editor of the SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, SIAM Review, and the International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, as well as several conference proceedings.

Heath is also author of the widely adopted textbook "Scientific Computing: An Introductory Survey," 2nd edition, published by McGraw-Hill in 2002. In 2000, he was named an ACM Fellow by the Association for Computing Machinery. In 2002, he was elected a member of the European Academy of Sciences, and in 2007 he won the Apple Award for Innovation in Science.

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Taylor Booth Medal