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Computer Pioneer Award

Nomination Deadline: 15 October 2014 for 2015 Awards

No endorsement is required.

The Computer Pioneer was established in 1981 by the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The award is presented to outstanding individuals whose main contribution to the concepts and development of the computer field was made at least fifteen years earlier.

The recognition is engraved on a silver medal specially struck for the Society.

All members of the profession are invited to nominate a colleague who they consider most eligible to be considered for this award.

 

Past Recipients for Computer Pioneer

2014 Linus Torvalds For pioneering development of the Linux kernel using the open-source approach.
2013 Stephen B. Furber For pioneering work as a principal designer of the ARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor.
2013 Edward Feigenbaum For pioneering work in Artificial Intelligence, including development of the basic principles and methods of knowledge-based systems and their practical applications.
2012 Cleve Moler For improving the quality of mathematical software, making it more accessible and creating MATLAB.
2011 David Kuck For pioneering parallel architectures including the Illiac IV, the Burroughs BSP, and Cedar; and, for revolutionary parallel compiler technology including Parafrase and KAP Tools.
2009 Jean Sammet For pioneering work and lifetime achievement as one of the first developers and researchers in programming languages.
2009 Lynn Conway For contributions to superscalar architecture, including multiple-issue dynamic instruction scheduling, and for the innovation and widespread teaching of simplified VLSI design methods.
2008 Betty Jean Jennings Bartik For pioneering work as one of the first programmers, including co-leading the first teams of ENIAC programmers, and pioneering work on BINAC and UNIVAC I.
2008 Edward J. McCluskey For seminal contributions to the design and synthesis of digital systems over five decades, including the first algorithm for logic synthesis (the Quine-McCluskey method).
2008 Carl A. Petri For establishing Petri net theory in 1962, which not only was cited by hundreds of thousands of scientific publications but also significantly advanced the fields of parallel and distributed computing.
2006 Mamoru Hosaka For recognition of pioneering activities within computing in Japan.
2006 Arnold M. Spielberg For recognition of contribution to real-time data acquisition and recording that significantly contributed to the definition of modern feedback and control processes.
2004 Frances (Fran) E. Allen For pioneering work establishing the theory and practice of compiler optimization.
2003 Martin Richards For pioneering system software portability through the programming language BCPL widely influential and used in academia and industry for a variety of prominent system software.
2002 Per Brinch Hansen For pioneering development in operating systems and concurrent programming, exemplified by work on the RC4000 multiprogramming system, monitors, and Concurrent Pascal.
2002 Robert W. Bemer For meeting the world's needs for variant character sets and other symbols, via ASCII, ASCII-alternate sets, and escape sequences.
2001 Vernon L. Schatz For the development of Electronics Funds Transfer which made possible computer to computer commercial transactions via the banking system.
2001 William H. Bridge For the marrying of computer and communications technology in the GE DATANET 30, putting terminals on peoples desks to communicate with and timeshare a computer, leading directly to the development of the personal computer, computer networking and the internet.
2000 Harold W. Lawson For inventing the pointer variable and introducing this concept into PL/I, thus providing for the first time, the capability to flexibly treat linked lists in a general-purpose high level language.
2000 Gennady Stolyarov For pioneering development in Minsk series computers' software, of the information systems' software and applications and for data processing and data base management systems concepts dissemination and promotion.
2000 Georgy Lopato For pioneering development in Belarus of the Minsk series computers' hardware, of the multicomputer complexes and of the RV family of mobile computers for heavy field conditions.
1999 Herbert Freeman For pioneering work on the first computer built by the Sperry Corporation, the SPEEDAC, and for subsequent contributions to the areas of computer graphics and image processing.
1998 Irving John (Jack) Good For significant contributions to the field of computing as a Cryptologist and statistician during World War II at Bletchley Park, as an early worker and developer of the Colossus at Bletchley Park and on the University of Manchester Mark I, the world's first stored program computer.
1997 Homer (Barney) Oldfield For pioneering work in the development of banking applications through the implementation of ERMA, and the introduction of computer manufacturing to GE.
1997 Francis Elizabeth (Betty) Snyder-Holberton For the development of the first sort-merge generator for the Univac which inspired the first ideas about compilation.
1996 Angel Angelov For computer science technologies in Bulgaria.
1996 Richard F. Clippinger For computing laboratory staff member, Aberdeen Proving Ground, who converted the ENIAC to a stored program.
1996 Edgar Frank Codd For the invention of the first abstract model for database management.
1996 Norbert Fristacky For pioneering digital devices.
1996 Victor M. Glushkov For digital automation of computer architecture.
1996 Jozef Gruska For the development of computer science in former Czechoslovakia with fundamental contributions to the theory of computing and extraordinary organizational activities.
1996 Jiri Horejs For informatics and computer science.
1996 Lubomir Georgiev Iliev A founder and influential leader of computing in Bulgaria; leader of the team that developed the first Bulgarian computer; made fundamental and continuing contributions to abstract mathematics and software.
1996 Robert E. Kahn For the co-invention of the TCP/IP protocols and for originating the Internet program.
1996 Laszlo Kalmar For recognition as the developer of a 1956 logical machine and the design of the MIR computer in Hungary.
1996 Antoni Kilinski For pioneering work in the construction of the first commercial computers in Poland, and for the development of university curriculum in computer science.
1996 Laszlo Kozma For development of the 1930 relay machines, and going on to build early computers in post-war Hungary.
1996 Sergey A. Lebedev For the first computer in the Soviet Union.
1996 Alexey A. Lyapunov For Soviet cybernetics and programming.
1996 Romuald W. Marczynski For pioneering work in the construction of the first Polish digital computers and contributions to fundamental research in computer architecture.
1996 Grigore C. Moisil For polyvalent logic switching circuits.
1996 Ivan Plander For the introduction of computer hardware technology into Slovakia and the development of the first control computer.
1996 Arnols Reitsakas For contributions to Estonia's computer age.
1996 Antonin Svoboda For the pioneering work leading to the development of computer research in Czechoslovakis and the design and construction of the SAPO and EPOS computers.
1995 Gerald Estrin For significant developments on early computers.
1995 David Evans For seminal work on computer graphics.
1995 Butler Lampson For early concepts and developments of the PC.
1995 Marvin Minsky For conceptual development of artificial intelligence.
1995 Kenneth Olsen For concepts and development of minicomputers.
1994 Gerrit A. Blaauw In recognition of your contributions to the IBM System/360 Series of computers.
1994 Harlan B. Mills In recognition of contributions to Structured Programming.
1994 Dennis M. Ritchie In recognition of contributions to the development of Unix.
1994 Ken L. Thompson For his work with UNIX.
1993 Erich Bloch For high speed computing.
1993 Jack S. Kilby For co-inventing the integrated circuit.
1993 Willis H. Ware For the design of IAS and Johnniac computers.
1992 Stephen W. Dunwell For project stretch.
1992 Douglas C. Engelbart For human computer interaction.
1991 Bob O. Evans For compatible computers.
1991 Robert W. Floyd For early compilers.
1991 Thomas E. Kurtz For BASIC.
1990 Werner Buchholz For computer architecture.
1990 C.A.R. Hoare For programming languages definitions.
1989 John Cocke For instruction pipelining and RISC concepts.
1989 James A. Weidenhammer For high speed I/O mechanisms.
1989 Ralph L. Palmer For the IBM 604 electronic calculator.
1989 Mina S. Rees For the ONR Computer R&D development beginning in 1946.
1989 Marshall C. Yovits For the ONR Computer R&D development beginning in 1946.
1989 F. Joachim Weyl For the ONR Computer R&D development beginning in 1946.
1989 Gordon D. Goldstein For his work with the Office of Naval Research and computer R&R beginning in 1946.
1988 Freidrich L. Bauer For computer stacks.
1988 Marcian E. Hoff, Jr. For microprocessor on a chip.
1987 Robert R. Everett For Whirlwind.
1987 Reynold B. Johnson For RAMAC.
1987 Arthur L. Samuel For Adaptive non-numeric processing.
1987 Nicklaus E. Wirth For PASCAL.
1986 Cuthbert C. Hurd For contributions to early computing.
1986 Peter Naur For computer language development.
1986 James H. Pomerene For IAS and Harvest computers.
1986 Adriann van Wijngaarden For ALGOL 68.
1985 John G. Kemeny For BASIC.
1985 John McCarthy For LISP and artificial intelligence.
1985 Alan Perlis For computer language translation.
1985 Ivan Sutherland For the graphics SKETCHPAD.
1985 David J. Wheeler For assembly language programming.
1985 Heniz Zemanek For computer and computer languages MAILUEFTERL.
1984 John Vincent Atanasoff For the first electronic computer with serial memory.
1984 Jerrier A. Haddad For his part in the lead IBM 701 design team.
1984 Nicholas C. Metropolis For the first solved atomic energy problems on ENIAC.
1984 Nathaniel Rochester For the architecture of IBM 702 electronic data processing machines.
1984 Willem L. van der Poel For the serial computer ZEBRA.
1982 Harry D. Huskey For the first parallel computer SWAC.
1982 Arthur Burks For his early work in electronic computer logic design.
1981 Jeffrey Chuan Chu For his early work in electronic computer logic design.

 

Computer Pioneer Charter Recipients 

On the occasion of the initiation of the Computer Pioneer Award, the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society has named, as charter recipients of this award, the following individuals who meet the Computer Pioneer Award criteria, and who also have received previous computer awards sponsored by the Society.

 

Howard H. Aiken CR "Large-Scale Automatic Computation"
Samuel N. Alexander CR "SEAC"
Gene M. Amdahl CR "Large-Scale Computer Architecture"
John W. Backus CR "FORTRAN"
Robert S. Barton CR "Language-Directed Architecture"
C. Gordon Bell CR "Computer Design"
Frederick P. Brooks, Jr. CR "Compatible Computer Family System/360"
Wesley A. Clark CR "First Personal Computer"
Fernando J. Corbato CR "Timesharing"
Seymour R. Cray CR "Scientific Computer Systems"
Edsgar W. Dijkstra CR "Multiprogramming Control"
J. Presper Eckert CR "First All-Electronic Computer - ENIAC"
Jay W. Forrester CR "First Large-Scale Coincident Current Memory"
Herman H. Goldstine CR "Contributions to Early Computer Design"
Richard W. Hamming CR "Error-Correcting Code"
Jean A. Hoerni CR "Planar Semiconductor Manufacturing Process"
Grace M. Hopper CR "Automatic Programming"
Alston S. Householder CR "Numerical Methods"
David A. Huffman CR Sequential Circuit Design"
Kenneth E. Iverson CR "APL"
Tom Kilburn CR "Paging Computer Design"
Donald E. Knuth CR "Science of Computer Algorithms"
Herman Lukoff CR "Early Electronic Computer Circuits"
John W. Mauchly CR "First All-Electronic Computer - ENIAC"
Gordon E. Moore CR "Integrated Circuit Production Technology"
Allen Newell CR "Contributions to Artificial Intelligence"
Robert N. Noyce CR "Integrated Circuit Production Technology"
Lawrence G. Roberts CR "Packet Switching"
George R. Stibitz CR "First Remote Computation"
Shmuel Winograd CR "Efficiency of Computational Algorithms"
Maurice V. Wilkes CR "Microprogramming"
Konrad Zuse CR "First Process Control Computer"

 

2014 COMPUTER PIONEER SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIR

Steven J. Wallach

Nomination site

Deadline for 2015 nominations is 15 OCT 2014

University of Manchester's Steve Furber Named Recipient of IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 24 May 2013 – Steve Furber, ICL Professor of Computer Engineering in the University of Manchester's School of Computer Science, has been named a 2013 recipient of IEEE Computer Society's Computer Pioneer Award.
 
Furber worked for Acorn Computers Ltd. in Cambridge, United Kingdom during the 1980s, and was a principal designer of the BBC Microcomputer, which introduced computers into most UK schools. Furber was also a principal designer of the first ARM 32-bit microprocessor. Its descendants power most of the world's consumer electronics. More than 44 billion ARM processors have been shipped to date by ARM's semiconductor partners.
 
Furber has been ICL Chair at Manchester since 1990 and serves as head of the Advanced Processor Technologies research group. His research interests include asynchronous digital design, multicore computer architecture and neural systems engineering.
 
He leads the Spiking Neural Network Architecture (SpiNNaker) project, which aims to build 1 million ARM processor cores into a machine tuned for executing real-time brain models. Furber's vision is to use his computer engineering skills to contribute to the multidisciplinary Grand Challenge to understand the information processing principles at work in the brain.
 
Furber is a Fellow of IEEE, the Royal Society, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the British Computer Society, and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). He has received a Royal Academy of Engineering Silver Medal, a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, and the IET Faraday Medal. He was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2008 and was a Technology Academy of Finland 2010 Millenium Technology Prize laureate. He is a Computer History Museum 2012 Fellow Award honoree, and has honorary doctorates from the University of Edinburgh and Anglia Ruskin University.
 
Furber holds bachelor's and master's degrees in mathematics and a PhD in aerodynamics from Cambridge University, UK.
 
The Computer Pioneer was established in 1981 by the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The award is presented to outstanding individuals whose main contribution to the concepts and development of the computer field was made at least 15 years earlier. The recognition is engraved on a bronze medal specially struck for the Society.
 
This year, IEEE Computer Society's Award Committee has named two Pioneer Award recipients. The other recipient is Stanford University Professor Emeritus Edward Feigenbaum, known as "the father of expert systems."

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Stanford University's Edward Feigenbaum to Receive IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 19 April, 2013 – Stanford University Professor Emeritus Edward Feigenbaum, known as "the father of expert systems," has the distinction of being named the IEEE Computer Society's 2013 Computer Pioneer Award recipient.

Feigenbaum received the award "for pioneering work in artificial intelligence, including development of the basic principles and methods of knowledge?based systems and their practical applications." The Pioneer Award is given for significant contributions to early concepts and developments in the electronic computer field, which have clearly advanced the state-of-the-art in computing.

Feigenbaum holds BS and PhD degrees from Carnegie Mellon University, where his dissertation, supervised by Nobel Laureate Herbert Simon, produced the first computer simulation of human learning. In 1965, Feigenbaum joined the Stanford University computer science faculty, where  he and Nobel laureate biologist Joshua Lederberg started the DENDRAL project, producing the world's first expert system.

DENDRAL's groundbreaking accomplishments inspired an evolution of expert systems, moving artificial intelligence out of the laboratory and into countless software applications. It also changed the framework of AI science: the power of an AI program came to be seen as largely in its knowledge base, not in its inference processes.

Feigenbaum coauthored the first public list processing language, IPL-V, and  founded Stanford's Heuristic Programming Project. He also co-authored and co-edited "Computers and Thought," the four-volume encyclopedia "Handbook of Artificial Intelligence," and popular-audience books "Fifth Generation," and "Rise of the Expert Company."

From 1994 to 1997, he served as chief scientist of the US Air Force; and was awarded its Exceptional Civilian Service Award. Feigenbaum is a 1994 ACM Turing Award recipient, an inaugural member of the IEEE Intelligent Systems Artificial Intelligence Hall of Fame, and a member of the Computer History Museum's Hall of Fellows.

 He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was the first recipient of the Feigenbaum Medal of the International Congress on Expert Systems. The Feigenbaum Prize is awarded biennially by AAAI, (Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI).

The Computer Pioneer Award was established in 1981 by the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The award is presented to outstanding individuals whose main contribution to the concepts and development of the computer field was made at least 15 years earlier. The recognition is engraved on a bronze medal specially struck for the Society.

Recent Pioneer Award recipients include ENIAC programmer Betty Jean Jennings Bartik, VLSI expert Lynn Conway, parallel programming pioneer David Kuck, digital systems designer Edward McCluskey, MATLAB creator Cleve Moler, petri net theory developer Carl Petri, and programming languages pioneer Jean Sammet.  For more information, visit http://www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/pioneer.


About the IEEE Computer Society

The IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading computing membership organization and the trusted information and career-development source for a global workforce of technology leaders including: professors, researchers, software engineers, IT professionals, employers, and students. The unmatched source for technology information, inspiration, and collaboration, the IEEE Computer Society is the source that computing professionals trust to provide high-quality, state-of-the-art information on an on-demand basis. The Computer Society provides a wide range of forums for top minds to come together, including technical conferences, publications, and a comprehensive digital library, unique training webinars, professional training, and a Corporate Affiliate Program to help organizations increase their staff's technical knowledge and expertise. To find out more about the community for technology leaders, visit http://www.computer.org.

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MATLAB Creator Cleve Moler Wins Computer Pioneer Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 11 April, 2012 – MATLAB creator Cleve Moler has the distinction of being named the IEEE Computer Society's 2012 Computer Pioneer Award recipient.

Cleve MolerMoler, a co-founder, chairman, and chief mathematician of MathWorks, received the honor "for improving the quality of mathematical software, making it more accessible, and creating MATLAB." MATLAB is a programming environment for algorithm development, data analysis, visualization, and numerical computation. MATLAB allows for faster solutions to technical computing problems than with traditional programming languages, such as C, C++, and Fortran.

Moler is also the recipient of the 2011 Sidney Fernbach Award for fundamental contributions to linear algebra, mathematical software, and enabling tools for computational science.

In his academic career, Moler served as a professor of mathematics and computer science at the University of Michigan, Stanford University, and the University of New Mexico, where he also held the position of chair of the Computer Science department. During his tenure at the University of New Mexico, he developed several packages of mathematical software for computational science and engineering. These packages eventually formed the basis for MATLAB, a high-level technical computing environment.

In 1984, Moler and Jack Little founded MathWorks to commercialize and continue development of MATLAB. Before joining MathWorks full-time in 1989, he spent five years with two computer hardware manufacturers, the Intel Hypercube organization and Ardent Computer. Moler currently serves as chief mathematician at MathWorks.

Moler is the one of the authors of the LINPACK and EISPACK scientific subroutine libraries, as well as author or co-author of five text books on numerical analysis and computational science. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a past president of SIAM, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

Moler currently works remotely from his home office in Santa Fe, New Mexico, writing books, articles, and MATLAB programs.

The Computer Pioneer was established in 1981 by the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The award is presented to outstanding individuals whose main contribution to the concepts and development of the computer field was made at least 15 years earlier. The recognition is engraved on a bronze medal specially struck for the Society.
 

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David Kuck Receives 2011 Computer Pioneer Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 25 April, 2011 – David Kuck, an influential figure in parallel computing, has been named the 2011 recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Computer Pioneer Award. Over the past four decades, Kuck influenced a wide range of areas, including architecture design and evaluation, compiler technology, programming languages, and algorithms. He is especially well known for his parallel programming productivity tools.

Kuck, winner of a 2010 Ken Kennedy Award, was recognized with a Computer Pioneer Award "for pioneering parallel architectures including the Illiac IV, the Burroughs BSP, and Cedar; and, for revolutionary parallel compiler technology including Parafrase and KAP.2009." He is set to accept his award at a May 25 dinner in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Computer Pioneer was established in 1981 by the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The award is presented to outstanding individuals whose main contribution to the concepts and development of the computer field was made at least 15 years earlier. The recognition is engraved on a bronze medal specially struck for the Society.

Kuck's influence has been both theoretical and practical. At University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), he created the Computational Sciences program, which initiated a new and unique research focus that has contributed significantly to UIUC's multidisciplinary excellence.

The Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CSRD) at UIUC, which he created, was extraordinarily influential in developing parallel computing technology (from hardware to algorithms) in the era of vectorization and SMPs. As founder and director of Kuck and Associates (KAI) and later as an Intel Fellow, Kuck's work subsequently influenced industry.

Every compiler in use today incorporates techniques pioneered by Kuck, targeting parallelism in its many forms and managing locality. In this era of multi-core and many-core architectures and petascale supercomputers, this work is now more important than it has ever been adapting software to use new hardware effectively. As an outgrowth of his compiler work, he initiated efforts that led to the development of OpenMP, the most common solution for incorporating threads into scientific applications.

Kuck also influenced the design of several academic and industrial parallel computers, including the Illiac IV (as the only software person on the project), Burroughs BSP, Alliant, and Cedar. Ken Kennedy's own work was heavily influenced by David Kuck. While on sabbatical at IBM, David provided Kennedy with access to Kuck's Parafrase system, which was the spark that initiated vectorization research both at Rice (the PFC system) and at IBM (PTRAN).

Kuck graduated more than 25 students, many of whom have gone on to have significant influence in the field in their own right, as academics, authors of influential books, and leaders in industry. They include: Duncan Lawrie, Stott Parker, David Padua, Ron Cytron, Constantine Polychronopolous, Alex Veidenbaum, Michael Wolfe, and Utpal Banerjee.

Last year's Computer Pioneer Award recipients were Jean Sammet, one of the first developers and researchers in programming languages; and Lynne Conway, who made pioneering contributions to superscalar architecture and the widespread teaching of simplified VLSI design methods.

The 2008 recipients were ENIAC programmer Betty Jean Jennings Bartik and Edward J. McKluskey, developer of the first algorithm for logic synthesis (the Quine-McCluskey method). Bartik, shown in her acceptance video, passed away earlier this month. Click here for the full list of Computer Pioneer recipients.

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Computer Society Names Computer Pioneers

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 20 January, 2010 – University of Michigan professor Lynn Conway, who helped revolutionize Very Large System Integration design, and Jean Sammet, an early programmer and expert on programming languages, are the 2009 recipients of the IEEE Computer Society Computer Pioneer Award.

Conway, a University of Michigan professor emerita of electrical engineering and computer science, joined IBM after earning her B.S. and M.S.E.E. degrees from Columbia University. At IBM, she made foundational contributions to superscalar computer architecture in the mid-1960s, including the innovation of multiple-issue dynamic instruction scheduling (DIS).

At Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Conway innovated scalable MOS design rules and highly simplified methods for silicon chip design, co-authoring the famous "Mead-Conway" text and pioneering the new form of university course that taught these methods – thereby launching a worldwide revolution in VLSI system design in the late-1970s.

Her citation reads: "For contributions to superscalar architecture, including multiple-issue dynamic instruction scheduling, and for the innovation and widespread teaching of simplified VLSI design methods."

Conway also pioneered the Internet-based rapid-chip prototyping infrastructure that was institutionalized as the "MOSIS" system by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the US National Science Foundation–supporting rapid development of thousands of chip designs and leading to many Silicon Valley startups in the 1980s.

After serving as assistant director for strategic computing at DARPA from 1983 to 1985, Conway joined the University of Michigan as professor of EECS and associate dean of engineering. Her VLSI design revolution enabled her multi-issue DIS innovation to come to life in Intel's Pentium microprocessors.

Conway is an IEEE Fellow, and was the recipient of the University of Pennsylvania's Pender Award, the Franklin Institute's Wetherill Medal, Secretary of Defense Meritorious Achievement Award, and the Society of Women Engineers National Achievement Award. She was elected to the Electronic Design Hall of Fame and National Academy of Engineering.

Sammet has a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College and an M.A. from the University of Illinois, both in mathematics. She received an honorary D.Sc. from Mount Holyoke in 1978.

Sammet organized and supervised the first scientific programming group for Sperry Gyroscope Co. from 1955 to 1958. She worked at Sylvania Electric Products from 1958 to 1961. While at Sylvania, she served as a key member of the original COBOL committee. She joined IBM in 1961 to organize and manage the Boston Programming Center in the IBM Data Systems Division to do advanced development work in programming. She initiated the concept, and directed the development, of the first FORMAC (FORmula MAnipulation Complier), for which she received an IBM Outstanding Contribution Award In 1965. (FORMAC was the first widely used general language and system for manipulating nonnumeric algebraic expressions.)

During the 1970s, she worked for IBM's Federal Systems Division, and initiated the concept of, and managed the development of PDI/Ada and handled other Ada activities in IBM. In 1979, she became software technology manager for the division.

Sammet is the author of "PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES: History and Fundamentals," which has become a standard programming textbook, and was described as an "instant computer classic" when it was published in 1969. She taught one of the first graduate courses in programming at Adelphi College from 1956 to 1958.

She was very active in ACM and served as president, vice president, organizer, and first chair of the Special Interest Committee on Symbolic and Algebraic Manipulation (SIGSAM); chair of the Special Interest Group on Programming Languages (SIGPLAN); editor-in-chief of the online sites Computing Reviews and ACM Guide to Computing Literature; general chair and program chair for the first SIGPLAN History of Programming Languages (HOPL) in 1978, and program chair for HOPL-II in 1993.

She also served on the USASI (now ANSI) X3.4 Committee on Programming Languages, and various groups on Ada. She organized and was the first chair of the AFIPS History of Computing committee, and helped start the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

Her citation reads: "For pioneering work and lifetime achievement as one of the first developers and researchers in programming languages." She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and among other awards received a 1985 ACM Distinguished Service Award, a 1989 Augusta Ada Lovelace Award from the Association for Women in Computing, and was named a Computer History Museum Fellow in 2001.

Computer Pioneer Medal