Tsutomu Kanai Award

The Tsutomu Kanai Award was established in 1997 by a generous endowment from Hitachi Ltd., and named in honor of Dr. Tsutomu Kanai who served as Hitachi's president for 30 years. 

The Kanai Award recognized major contributions to the state-of-the art distributed computing systems and their applications. 

The award consisted of a crystal model, certificate, and $10,000 honorarium. The Kanai Award was discontinued after the 2012 award.

Learn more about Tsutomu Kanai

Past recipients for Tsutomu Kanai Award

2012 Beng Chin Ooi For pioneering research in distributed database management and peer-to-peer based enterprise quality management.
2011 Ian T. Foster For pioneering research in grid computing, integrating geographically distributed instruments, computers, and data.
2009 Kenneth P. Birman For fundamental and practical contributions to distributed computing, fault tolerance, reliability and distributed systems management.
2008 Benjamin W. Wah For outstanding contributions to the theory and applications of distributed multimedia and nonlinear optimization algorithms.
2007 Willy Zwaenepoel For contributions to cluster-based distributed computing for scientific and Web applications.
2006 Larry Smarr For pioneering research in the design and architecture of distributed national infrastructures for high-performance computing.
2005 Elisa Bertino For pioneering and innovative research contributions to secure distributed systems.
2004 Kane Kim For fundamental and pioneering contributions to the scientific foundation of both real-time object-structuring based distributed computing and real-time fault-tolerant distributed computing.
2003 James Gosling For major contributions to advances in the technology for construction of distributed computing systems through invention of the Java Language system.
2002 Stephen S. Yau For outstanding contributions to distributed computing software engineering and promotion of the community of distributed computing software researchers.
2001 Alfred Z. Spector For technical leadership in the design and implementation of reliable, scalable architectures for supporting distributed files and distributed applications, and for pioneering in their commercialization.
2000 C. V. Ramamoorthy For pioneering fundamental contributions to extracting parallelism and to the design of distributed system.
1999 Kenneth L. Thompson For creating the UNIX Operating System, which for more than 20 years has been a key platform for distributed systems work.

Beng Chin Ooi Receives 2012 IEEE Computer Society Kanai Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 30 January, 2012 – Beng Chin Ooi, professor of computer science and dean of the School of Computing at the National University of Singapore, has been named winner of the IEEE Computer Society's 2012 Tsutomu Kanai Award.

Beng Chin, director of NUS's Interactive Digital Media Institute and IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering editor in chief, was recognized "for pioneering research in distributed database management and peer-to-peer-based enterprise quality management."

The award recognizes major contributions to state-of-the art distributed computing systems and their applications. It consists of a crystal model, certificate, and $10,000 honorarium. The seminal nature of the achievements, their practical impact, breadth and depth, and the quality of the nomination are all considered.

The Kanai Award was established in 1997 by a generous endowment from Hitachi Ltd., and named in honor of Tsutomu Kanai, who served as Hitachi's president for 30 years.

Beng Chin will receive his award at the Computer Society's 2011 awards ceremony in Seattle, Washington on Wednesday, 13 June.

Beng Chin's research interests include database system architectures, performance issues, indexing techniques and query processing, in the context of multimedia, spatio-temporal, distributed, parallel, P2P, and cloud-based database systems and applications.

He has served as program chair for numerous international conferences such as the IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE), VLDB, WWW, and the Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (SIGKDD).

Beng Chin was an editor of VLDB Journal and co-chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD) Jim Gray Best Thesis Award committee. Besides being editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering (TKDE), he serves as an editor of Distributed and Parallel Databases Journal, is an advisory board member of SIGMOD, and a trustee board member and executive of the VLDB Endowment.

He is the recipient of the ACM SIGMOD 2009 Contributions award, co-winner of the 2011 Singapore President's Science Award, and an ACM and IEEE Fellow. To find out more about the award or view previous recipients, visit http://www.computer.org/awards.

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Ian T. Foster Named 2011 Recipient of Kanai Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif. 5 April 2011 -- Ian T. Foster has been named recipient of the 2011 IEEE Computer Society Tsutomu Kanai Award for his accomplishments in grid computing.

The award recognizes major contributions to state-of-the art distributed computing systems and their applications. It was established in 1997 by a generous endowment from Hitachi Ltd., and named in honor of Tsutomu Kanai, who served as Hitachi's president for 30 years.

Foster won the recognition "for pioneering research in grid computing, integrating geographically distributed instruments, computers, and data," according to his citation.

The Kanai award consists of a crystal model, certificate, and $10,000 honorarium. The seminal nature of the achievements, their practical impact, breadth, and depth, and the quality of the nomination are all considered. Foster will receive his award at the Computer Society's 2011 awards ceremony in Albuquerque, New Mexico on 25 May.

Foster is the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor of Computer Science at the University of Chicago and an Argonne Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory. He is also the director of the Computation Institute, a joint unit of Argonne and the University of Chicago.

The primary focus of Foster's research has been the acceleration of discovery in a networked world. In partnership with many others, notably Carl Kesselman and Steven Tuecke, Foster developed and promulgated concepts and methods that underpin grid computing. These methods allow computing to be delivered reliably and securely on demand, as a service, and permit the formation and operation of virtual organizations linking people and resources worldwide.

These results, and the associated Globus open source software, have helped advance discovery in such areas as high-energy physics, environmental science, and biomedicine. Grid computing methods have also proved influential outside the world of science, contributing to the emergence of cloud computing.

Among recent projects, Globus Online seeks to outsource complex and time-consuming research management processes to software-as-a-service providers; the goal here is to make the discovery potential of massive data, exponentially faster computers, and deep interdisciplinary collaboration accessible to every researcher, not just a select few "big science" projects.

Foster received a BSc (Hons I) degree from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and a PhD from Imperial College, United Kingdom, both in computer science. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association for Computing Machinery, and British Computer Society.
His other awards include the Global Information Infrastructure Next Generation award, the British Computer Society's Lovelace Medal, R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year, and honorary doctorates from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and CINVESTAV, Mexico. He co-founded Univa, a company established to deliver grid and cloud computing solutions.
 

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Cornell Professor Named Tsutomu Kanai Winner

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 3 March, 2010 – Kenneth P. Birman, Cornell University's N. Rama Rao Professor, has been named the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society's 2009 Tsutomu Kanai Award.

The award recognizes major contributions to state-of-the art distributed computing systems and their applications. It was established in 1997 by a generous endowment from Hitachi Ltd., and named in honor of Tsutomu Kanai, who served as Hitachi's president for 30 years.

Birman was recognized "for fundamental and practical contributions to distributed computing, fault tolerance, reliability and distributed systems management."

The Kanai award consists of a crystal model, certificate, and $10,000 honorarium. The seminal nature of the achievements, their practical impact, breadth, and depth, and the quality of the nomination are all considered. Birman will receive his award at the Computer Society's 2010 awards ceremony in Denver.

Birman's work has focused on the development of trustworthy distributed computing systems. Early in his career, he developed the Isis Toolkit, a reliable group communication system that introduced the virtual synchrony model for fault-tolerance. Isis was widely adopted, and was used at the core of such mission-critical systems as the French Air Traffic Control System, the New York Stock Exchange, and the US Navy AEGIS warship.

Birman's group subsequently developed a series of systems that took group communication a step further, as well as others that explored challenges of extreme scale using gossip and peer-to-peer protocols. These included Horus, Ensemble, the Bimodal Multicast, the Astrolabe platform, and the Gossip Objects platform. Ideas and technology from these efforts have helped shape modern Cloud Computing systems, including the communication layer of IBM's flagship Websphere product, Microsoft's cluster management platform and Amazon's data-center management systems.

Among recent projects, the Live Distributed Objects System offers a novel and easily used Web mashup technology, offers a way to integrate cloud hosted data sources with peer-to-peer technology using an easily learned drag-and-drop development style.

Birman was named as a Fellow of the ACM in 1998, and was awarded the 2009 IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems Outstanding Achievement Award.

The deadline to make a nomination for the 2010 award is 15 October. For more information, visit http://www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/kanai.

 

About the IEEE Computer Society

With nearly 85,000 members, the IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading organization of computing professionals. Founded in 1946, and the largest of IEEE's 38 societies, the Computer Society is dedicated to advancing the theory and application of computer and information-processing technology. The Society serves the information and career-development needs of today's computing researchers and practitioners with technical journals, magazines, conferences, books, conference publications, certifications, and online courses. For more information, visit http://www.computer.org.

Kenneth P. Birman

2009 IEEE Computer Society Tsutomu Kanai Award


 

The IEEE Computer Society presented its 2009 Tsutomu Kanai Award to Kenneth P. Birman for his contributions to distributed computing, fault tolerance, reliability, and distributed systems management. The Tsutomu Kanai Award recognizes an individual who has made exceptional contributions in the area of distributed computing systems. Professor Birman accepted his award at the Computer Society's 9 June 2010 awards ceremony in Denver, Colorado.

Kenneth P. Birman holds the N. Rama Rao Chair Professorship at Cornell University. His work has focused on the development of trustworthy distributed computing systems. Early in his career, he developed the Isis Toolkit, a reliable group communication system that introduced the virtual synchrony model for fault tolerance, used at the core of such mission-critical systems as the French Air Traffic Control System and the New York Stock Exchange.

For more information about Kenneth P. Birman: http://www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/birman
For more information about IEEE Computer Society Awards: http://www.computer.org/awards

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Previous Awards Presentations

Benjamin W. Wah

2008 Tsutomu Kanai Recipient

 

Benjamin W. Wah is the Franklin W. Woeltge Endowed Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Professor of the Coordinated Science Laboratory of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL. He also serves as the Director of the Advanced Digital Sciences Center, a large scale research center of the University of Illinois located in Singapore and funded by Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR).

For more information about Benjamin W. Wah: http://www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/wah
For more information about IEEE Computer Society Awards: http://www.computer.org/awards

 

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Tsutomu Kanai Award Presentations

Ian T. Foster

2011 Tsutomu Kanai Award


2011 CS President Sorel Reisman presents
Tsutomu Kanai Award to Dr. Ian T. Foster

 

Previous Awards Ceremony

Kenneth P. Birman

2009 Tsutomu Kanai Award

 (Click on the picture to view more from the 2010 Denver Awards Ceremony) 

 Jim Isaak presenting the
2009 Tsutomu Kanai Award to Kenneth Birman



Benjamin W. Wah

2008 Tsutomu Kanai Award

 (Click on the picture to view more from the 2009 Savannah Awards Ceremony)  


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Kanai Crystal



The last Tsutomu Kanai Award
was presented to Dr. Beng Chin Ooi
on 13 June 2012