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Issue No. 04 - Oct.-Dec. (2016 vol. 9)
ISSN: 1939-1412
pp: 483-491
Trung Quang Pham , Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics, and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokisho-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
Takayuki Hoshi , Department of Information Physics and Computing, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Yoshihiro Tanaka , Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics, and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokisho-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
Akihito Sano , Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics, and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokisho-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
Takumi Kawaue , Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
Takaki Miyata , Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
ABSTRACT
Meissner corpuscles are the fast adapting type I (FA-I) mechanoreceptor that locates at the dermal papillae of skin. The Meissner corpuscle is well known for its complex structure, consisting of spiral axons, lamellar cells, and a collagen capsule. Fluorescent microscopy has become a convenient method for observing the Meissner corpuscle and its inner structure. This method requires preparing samples with fingertip cross-sections and performing antibody staining before observation. Various kinds of microscopy can be used for observation, such as confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the anatomical shape, distribution, and components of Meissner corpuscle are recognized, they have been mostly determined from observations of fixed tissues. Therefore, knowledge of mechanical transduction is limited by the lack of in vivo experiments and individual differences among samples. In this study, we propose a novel less invasive imaging method that incorporates a staining technique with lipophilic carbocyanine $\text{DiOC}_{16}(3)$ and two-photon microscopy. This combination allows us to repetitively observe the Meissner corpuscle in a living mouse.
INDEX TERMS
Mice, Axons, Scanning electron microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, In vivo,in-vivo imaging, Neuroscience, mechanoreceptors, methodologies and techniques
CITATION
Trung Quang Pham, Takayuki Hoshi, Yoshihiro Tanaka, Akihito Sano, Takumi Kawaue, Takaki Miyata, "Two-Photon Imaging of DiO-Labelled Meissner Corpuscle in Living Mouse's Fingertip", IEEE Transactions on Haptics, vol. 9, no. , pp. 483-491, Oct.-Dec. 2016, doi:10.1109/TOH.2016.2574718
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