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Guest Editors' Introduction: Special Section on IEEE Visualization

Jarke J. , IEEE
Robert J. , IEEE
Greg Turk, IEEE

Pages: pp. 369-370


About the Authors

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Jarke J. van Wijk received the MSc degree in industrial design engineering in 1982 and the PhD degree in computer science in 1986, both with honors. He worked from 1988 to 1998 at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN in The Netherlands, where he was engaged in research on flow visualization and computational steering. In 1998, he joined the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven and, in 2001, he was appointed a full professor in visualization. His main research interests are information visualization and flow visualization, both with a focus on the development of new visual representations. He has (co)authored more than 70 papers on visualization and computer graphics, including 13 IEEE Vis and 6 IEEE InfoVis papers. He is a member of the IEEE.
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Robert J. Moorhead II received the PhD degree in electrical and computer engineering and the MSEE degree from North Carolina State University in 1985 and 1982, respectively. He received the BSEE degree summa cum laude and with research honors from Geneva College in 1980. He is the director of the Visualization, Analysis, and Imaging Lab in the ERC GeoResources Institute and a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Mississippi State University. He previously worked as a research staff member in the Imaging Technologies Department at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center from 1985 to 1988. He has authored more than 95 papers or book chapters on visualization, image processing, and computer communications. He was the lead conference cochair for the IEEE Visualization '97 Conference, the chair of the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Visualization and Graphics in 1999 and 2000, and a papers cochair for the IEEE Visualization 2002 and 2003 Conferences. He is a senior member of the IEEE.
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Greg Turk received the PhD degree in computer science in 1992 from the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He was a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University for two years, followed by two years as a research scientist at UNC Chapel Hill. He is currently an associate professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is a member of the College of Computing and the Graphics, Visualization, and Usability Center. His research interests include computer graphics, scientific visualization and computer vision. He is a member of the IEEE.
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