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Guest Editors' Introduction: Special Section on Computer Arithmetic

Peter Kornerup, IEEE
Paolo Montuschi, IEEE
Jean-Michel Muller, IEEE
Eric Schwarz, IEEE

Pages: pp. 145-147


About the Authors

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Peter Kornerup received the Mag. Scient. degree in mathematics from Aarhus University, Denmark, in 1967. After a period with the University Computing Center, beginning in 1969, he was involved in establishing the computer science curriculum at Aarhus University, where he helped found the Computer Science Department in 1971 and where he served as its chairman until 1988, when he became a professor of computer science at Odense University, now the University of Southern Denmark. He spent a leave during 1975/1976 with the University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, four months in 1979 and shorter stays in many years with Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, one month with the Université de Provence in Marseille in 1996, and two months with the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon in 2001 and further visits in the following years. Professor Kornerup has served on program committees for numerous IEEE, ACM, and other meetings; in particular, he has been on the program committees for the 4th through the 19th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic and served as program cochair for this symposium in 1983, 1991, 1999, and 2007. He has been a guest editor for a number of journal special issues, and served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computers from 1991 to 1995. He is a member of the IEEE.
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Paolo Montuschi graduated in electronic engineering in 1984 and received the PhD degree in computer engineering in 1989 from the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. Since 2000, he has been a full tenured professor with the Politecnico di Torino and, since 2003, he has been the chair of the Department of Computer Engineering at the Politecnico di Torino. Currently, he is involved in several management and directive committees at the Politecnico di Torino. From 1988 to 1994, he was a member of the Board of the Italian Association for Computer Graphics. From 1995 to 1997 and in 2006, he was deputy chair of the Center for Computing Facilities and Services of the Politecnico di Torino. Since 1997, he has been a member of the Steering Committee of the Post-Lauream Degree in Computer Networks and Multimedia Systems of Politecnico di Torino. He also worked as a visiting scientist with the University of California at Los Angeles and the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya at Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Montuschi served on the program committees for the 13th through 19th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic and was program cochair of the 17th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic. From 2000 to 2004, he served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computers. His current research interests cover several aspects of both computer arithmetic, with a special emphasis on algorithms and architectures for fast elementary function evaluations, and computer graphics. Dr. Montuschi is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and a senior member of the IEEE. Since 2006, he has been a member of the CPOC (Conference Publications Operations Committee) of the Computer Society. Since 2008, he has been a member-at-large of the Publication Board of the IEEE Computer Society.
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Jean-Michel Muller received the PhD degree in 1985 from the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble. He is Directeur de Recherches (senior researcher) at CNRS, France, and he is the former head of the LIP laboratory (LIP is a joint laboratory of CNRS, the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, INRIA, and the Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1). His research interests are in computer arithmetic. Dr. Muller was co-program chair of the 13th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic (Asilomar, June 1997), general chair of SCAN '97 (Lyon, France, September 1997), general chair of the 14th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic (Adelaide, Australia, April 1999). He is the author of several books, including Elementary Functions, Algorithms and Implementation (second edition, Birkhäuser Boston, 2006). He served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computers from 1996 to 2000. He is a senior member of the IEEE.
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Eric Schwarz graduated in 1983 from the Pennsylvania State University with the BSESc degree, in 1984 from Ohio University with the MSEE degree, and in 1993 from Stanford University with the PhD degree in electrical engineering. He joined IBM Corporation in 1984 and now works in Poughkeepsie, New York, where he is a Distinguished Engineer in the Systems and Technology Division. He has worked on the 9371, G4, G5, G6, z900, z990, z9 109, and z10 mainframe computers as well as the recent POWER6 processor. He was chief engineer on the z900 core introduced in 2000 and is currently the core architect on a future z Series core. He led the development of the first z Series FPU to implement IEEE 754 binary floating-point standard in 1998, the first z Series 64-bit processor, and the first hardware implementations of decimal floating-point units as specified in the new 754-2008 IEEE floating-point standard. Dr. Schwarz has 32 issued US patents and 33 filings pending. He is also the author of 20 journal articles and numerous conference papers. He has served on the program committees for the 13th through 19th IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic and was program cochair of the 17th symposium in 2005. His research interests include computer arithmetic as well as computer architecture. He is a senior member of the IEEE.
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