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2017 IEEE Virtual Reality (VR) (2017)
Los Angeles, CA, USA
March 18, 2017 to March 22, 2017
ISSN: 2375-5334
ISBN: 978-1-5090-6648-3
pp: 141-147
Bobby Bodenheimer , Vanderbilt University, USA
Sarah Creem-Regehr , University of Utah, USA
Jeanine Stefanucci , University of Utah, USA
Elena Shemetova , Vanderbilt University, USA
William B. Thompson , University of Utah, USA
ABSTRACT
The use of first-person self-avatars in immersive virtual environments (VEs) has grown over recent years. It is unknown, however, how visual feedback from a self-avatar influences a user's online actions and subsequent calibration of actions within an immersive VE. The current paper uses a prism throwing adaptation paradigm to test the role of a self-avatar arm or full body on action calibration in a VE. Participants' throwing accuracy to a target on the ground was measured first in a normal viewing environment, then with the visual field rotated clockwise about their vertical axis by 17° (prism simulation), and then again in the normal viewing environment with the prism distortion removed. Participants experienced either no-avatar, a first-person avatar arm and hand, or a first-person full body avatar during the entire experimental session, in a between-subjects manipulation. Results showed similar throwing error and adaptation during the prism exposure for all conditions, but a reduced aftereffect (displacement with respect to the target in the opposite direction of the prism-exposure) when the avatar arm or full body was present. The results are discussed in the context of how an avatar can provide a visual frame of reference to aid in action calibration.
INDEX TERMS
Avatars, Visualization, Calibration, Legged locomotion, Tracking, Virtual environments, Head
CITATION

B. Bodenheimer, S. Creem-Regehr, J. Stefanucci, E. Shemetova and W. B. Thompson, "Prism aftereffects for throwing with a self-avatar in an immersive virtual environment," 2017 IEEE Virtual Reality (VR), Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2017, pp. 141-147.
doi:10.1109/VR.2017.7892241
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