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Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (2005)
Big Island, Hawaii
Jan. 3, 2005 to Jan. 6, 2005
ISSN: 1530-1605
ISBN: 0-7695-2268-8
pp: 279c
Mudita Singhal , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Kyle Klicker , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
George Chin , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Lynn Trease , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Eric Stephan , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Deborah Gracio , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
ABSTRACT
The use of computer tools and technologies is unavoidable when it comes to conducting mass spectrometry (MS) research at any significant level. This is mainly due to the large volume of MS data and the processing rates required. Most of the existing tools focus on one particular task: be it storing and maintaining the data or visualizing the dataset to draw inferences from the data. But for the researcher the problem of manually retrieving a large dataset from a datasource and customizing it for a particular visualization application is a daunting task in itself. This paper describes the Computational Cell Environment (CCE) which is a problem-solving environment for systems biology that provides uniform and integrated access to distributed, heterogeneous biological data sources and analysis applications, through a multi-tiered architecture. This paper also illustrates the necessity for such a tool by discussing its usage in proteomics research being performed on the diseased and normal states of Deinococcus Radiodurans along with corresponding curated data collected from community resources.
INDEX TERMS
proteomics, information management, problem solving environment, visualization
CITATION

M. Singhal, K. Klicker, E. Stephan, D. Gracio, L. Trease and G. Chin, "Bioinformatics Approach for Exploring MS/MS Proteomics Data," Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences(HICSS), Big Island, HI, USA USA, 2005, pp. 279c.
doi:10.1109/HICSS.2005.119
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