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2012 IEEE 8th International Conference on E-Science (e-Science) (2012)
Chicago, IL
Oct. 8, 2012 to Oct. 12, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-4673-4467-8
pp: 1-8
Spencer Lee , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Sherif Elmeligy Abdelhamid , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
S. M. Arifuzzaman , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Pete Beckman , Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL
Md Hasanuzzaman Bhuiyan , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Keith Bisset , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Edward A. Fox , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Geoffrey C. Fox , Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Kevin Hall , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
S. M. Shamimul Hasan , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Anurodh Joshi , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Maleq Khan , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Chris J. Kuhlman , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Richard Alo , University of Houston, Houston, TX
Jonathan P. Leidig , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Hemanth Makkapati , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Madhav V. Marathe , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Henning S. Mortveit , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Judy Qiu , Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
S. S. Ravi , University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY
Zalia Shams , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Ongard Sirisaengtaksin , University of Houston, Houston, TX
Rajesh Subbiah , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Samarth Swarup , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Nick Trebon , Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL
Anil Vullikanti , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Zhao Zhao , Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
ABSTRACT
Networks are an effective abstraction for representing real systems. Consequently, network science is increasingly used in academia and industry to solve problems in many fields. Computations that determine structure properties and dynamical behaviors of networks are useful because they give insights into the characteristics of real systems. We introduce a newly built and deployed cyberinfrastructure for network science (CINET) that performs such computations, with the following features: (i) it offers realistic networks from the literature and various random and deterministic network generators; (ii) it provides many algorithmic modules and measures to study and characterize networks; (iii) it is designed for efficient execution of complex algorithms on distributed high performance computers so that they scale to large networks; and (iv) it is hosted with web interfaces so that those without direct access to high performance computing resources and those who are not computing experts can still reap the system benefits. It is a combination of application design and cyberinfrastructure that makes these features possible. To our knowledge, these capabilities collectively make CINET novel. We describe the system and illustrative use cases, with a focus on the CINET user.
INDEX TERMS
Internet, parallel processing, scientific information systems, user interfaces
CITATION

S. E. Abdelhamid et al., "CINET: A cyberinfrastructure for network science," 2012 IEEE 8th International Conference on E-Science (e-Science)(E-SCIENCE), Chicago, IL, 2013, pp. 1-8.
doi:10.1109/eScience.2012.6404422
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