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ABSTRACT
The Internet was designed to interconnect a few hundreds networks, but now has more than a billion hosts. The scalability issues associated with this growth have driven both academia and industry to review the current architecture in the light of the Locator/Identifier Split paradigm. However, changing the routing and addressing architecture of the Internet in an incrementally deployable manner imposes several constraints. The authors use the IETF's Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP) as a reference to describe different design choices necessary to achieve deployability, which is the ultimate goal of any future Internet architecture.
INDEX TERMS
routing protocols, Internet, Internet architecture, deployable Internet, locator/identifier separation protocol, scalability issues, locator split paradigm, identifier split paradigm, routing architecture, addressing architecture, IETF, LISP, deployability, Internet, IP networks, Protocols, Routing, Scalability, Servers, Virtual private networks, architectures. LISP, Internet, IP networks, Protocols, Routing, Scalability, Servers, Virtual private networks, locator/identifier separation protocol, emerging technologies, communication, networking, information technology, standards, protocol architecture, Internet, routers
CITATION
L. Iannone, O. Bonaventure, D. Farinacci, D. Saucez, "Designing a Deployable Internet: The Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol", IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 16, no. , pp. 14-21, Nov.-Dec. 2012, doi:10.1109/MIC.2012.98
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