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Reversing the Bipolar Drift–Introducing the IAB

Carl K. Chang, Iowa State University

Pages: pp. 20-24

Abstract—The IAB's mission is to help the Computer Society critically examine the organization's business plans and practices and to offer advice and assistance to make the Society a relevant professional association.


In 2007, when I was appointed editor in chief of Computer, I set out with the objective of forming an industrial circle, tentatively titled the CTO Forum, 1 with the initial goals of representing the computer industry and helping to further enrich the editorial content of Computer. Following the initial formulation phase, the renamed Advanced Technology Executive Forum (ATEF) began actively serving as an advisory body and a sounding board for several Society-wide initiatives.

With the same spirit experienced with the formation of the ATEF, it is now my distinct privilege to introduce the Computer Society's Industry Advisory Board (IAB), morphed from the ATEF, which comprises a group of very distinguished industrial executives. In addition to these industry representatives, with Steve Huffman serving as their inaugural chair, the ex officio IAB members include 2009 Computer Society president Susan K. (Kathy) Land, CSDP; Angela R. Burgess, the Computer Society's executive director; and staff member Steve Bollweg.

IAB CHARTER

IAB members have already met several times face-to-face. In their charter, there are clauses for continuity as well as rotation. The IAB's mission is clear: to help the Computer Society critically examine the organization's business plans and practices and to offer advice and assistance to make the Society a relevant professional association for the entire computing profession, including industrialists, engineers, scientists, researchers, practitioners, and academics. In doing so, IAB members will also help develop editorial content for Computer.

We expect to benefit from their contributions in many dimensions, and look forward to welcoming future IAB members. In short, this advisory board, with some of the best minds representing our industrial colleagues, will certainly help accelerate the reversal of the bipolar drift referred to in my first editor's message published in IEEE Software almost 20 years ago. 2

A Compromise Between Pragmatists and Purists

In that editorial, I advocated promoting a compromise between thinkers (purists, researchers, theoreticians, or other appropriate terms) and doers (pragmatists, practitioners, or other relevant terms). Since that time, I have witnessed some improvements in both practice and attitude that have helped to slow (but not stop) the disparities between these two groups of professionals. For example, usability studies have become a norm for software releases. Many theoreticians now embrace scalability. Industrial researchers have been forced to take a more pragmatic approach because of the disappearance of pure research funding. Academic institutions are now more proactive in cultivating technology transfer and commercialization, also largely due to the pullback of governmental funding to support higher education.

While there is evidence that mutual appreciation and heightened collaboration between thinkers and doers has gradually emerged to benefit both camps, I still see some major differences. Nowadays, researchers in "cloud computing" are not speaking the same language as an industrial executive would use where ROI is key. Although many are excited about the great potential of this emerging technology, critically minded researchers may ask, what is really new? Yet, industrialists have been embracing cloud computing as a new business philosophy, a new practice, and a new revenue source, enabled by gradually evolving technological advances that may not be breakthroughs at all.

It is my hope that the new IAB will contribute toward continuously improving our relationships with each other, fostering understanding and innovations in industry and research. I trust that you will find that the IAB members gathered from major business and industrial enterprises are seasoned technologists responsible for assessing, developing, and deploying innovative computer technologies.

Two-Way Communication

I would encourage Computer readers to send letters to us and respond to the upcoming Industrial Perspective column, first appearing in Computer's September 2009 issue. The computing community will benefit tremendously from this two-way communication venue.

Computer is the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, and our readership comes from both industry and academia. We publish top-quality articles through a highly rigorous peer review process and occasionally via a highly effective acquisition process. Our articles are written by technical gurus who have thought-provoking messages and cutting-edge information to share. Our professional editors work hard to edit the content in each issue with our readers' interests in mind. High-quality content is what attracts the eyes and hearts of the readers, not just the names we all may be familiar with.

There is always room for improvement, even in our current global economic situation where resources for implementing creative ideas may be hard to come by. The newly established IAB has pledged to work with us for the continuous improvement of the Computer Society—your Society— and Computer—your publication.

Industry Advisory Board

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David R. Bernstein is vice president and general manager of Cisco's Network Applications Infrastructure unit. The NAI team is responsible for integration, acceleration, monitoring, and routing services at the applications and SOA layer for Cisco networks. Prior to joining Cisco, Bernstein was vice president of technology for Siebel Systems.

Bernstein started his career as an engineering team founder of the Santa Cruz Operation, where he developed Xenix, the first successful commercial Unix implementation on the PC. He holds degrees from the University of California in physics and mathematics and worked as a UC Regents Scholar at the Office of Naval Research.

Bernstein is a member of several standards, conferences, and open source organizations, including IEEE POSIX, the Apache Software Foundation, Java One, IBM's Web Services Council, the Eclipse Foundation, and Open SOA. Contact him at daberns@cisco.com.

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Nicholas (Nick) Bowen, vice president of technology for IBM, serves on IBM's Technical Leadership Team, a group of senior executives who oversee the development of IBM's worldwide technical team. He also manages the corporate nomination, selection, and evaluation processes for employees to be named IBM Fellow or Distinguished Engineer, in addition to determining what technical contributions warrant an IBM corporate award.

At IBM Research, Bowen was director of computing utilities, where he spearheaded the definition of the "intelligent infrastructure" research program and was worldwide director of research programs in servers. This group produced many exploratory system projects in addition to making contributions to AIX, OS/390, AS/400, and xSeries servers, as well as many products within the IBM software group.

Bowen received a BS in computer science from the University of Vermont, an MS in computer engineering from Syracuse University, and a PhD in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Contact him at bowenn@watson.ibm.com.

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Atsuhiro Goto is vice president and general manager of the Information Sharing Platform Laboratories at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone. He is responsible for platform systems and information processing technologies suitable for the ubiquitous broadband era, including cryptography, security, fixed-mobile convergence, computer architectures, the Internet, and IP communications.

Goto's research interests include network security architectures, network storage, and resilient distributed systems. He received a PhD from the University of Tokyo. Goto is a member of the IEEE; the ACM; the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers; and the Information Processing Society of Japan. Contact him at goto.atsuhiro@lab.ntt.co.jp.

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As corporate vice president of the external research division of Microsoft, Tony Hey is responsible for developing a worldwide external research and technical computing strategy for the company. He leads Microsoft's efforts to build long-term public-private partnerships with global scientific and engineering communities, facilitating in-depth engagements with academic and research institutions, related government agencies, and industry partners. Hey also oversees Microsoft Research's efforts to enhance the quality of higher education around the world.

Before joining Microsoft, Hey served as director of the UK's e-Science initiative, managing the government's efforts to provide scientists and researchers with access to key computing technologies.

Hey is a fellow of the UK's Royal Academy of Engineering and a member of the European Union Information Society technology advisory group. He has served on several national committees in the UK, including committees of the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Office of Science and Technology. Visit www.microsoft.com/presspass/exec/tonyhey to learn more.

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Steven Hillenius is executive vice president of the Semiconductor Research Corporation and executive director of the Global Research Collaboration. SRC is a semiconductor and related technologies university research consortium. Before joining SRC, Hillenius headed technology development and collaborative interactions for Agere Systems and Bell Laboratories. His team at Bell Labs was the first to produce 60-nm transistors, and conducted much of the early materials innovation on high-k gate dielectrics and novel three-dimensional device structures. He managed partnerships and jointdevelopment programs with NEC, ST Microelectronics, TSMC, and Chartered Semiconductor.

Hillenius is an IEEE Fellow, past president of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, and a former board member of the IEEE. He holds eight patents that resulted from his device and process research and has published more than 60 technical papers. Hillenius received a BS in physics from the University of Delaware and a PhD in physics from the University of Virginia. Contact him at steve.hillenius@src.org.

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Stephen D. Huffman is vice president and chief technology officer of MITRE. As CTO, Huffman is responsible for the direction of MITRE's research and development program, which explores emerging and enabling technologies and their application to critical national problems. Previously, Huffman served as vice president of MITRE's Washington Command, Control, and Communications Center, which is focused on ensuring integration and solving complex technical and operational challenges across the US Department of Defense.

Before joining MITRE, Huffman was director of research and development at M/A-COM Linkabit, where he developed anti-jam and low-probability-of-intercept communications systems, error-correction coders, speech store-and-forward systems, satellite communications, and signals intelligence systems.

Huffman received a BS, MS, and PhD in electrical engineering from Duke University and is a graduate of the general management program at Harvard Business School. He is a member of the IEEE and has published numerous peer-reviewed papers. Contact him at shuffman@mitre.org.

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Gargi Keeni, a vice president at Tata Consultancy Services, has more than 20 years of multicultural and multilocation experience in software development and services delivery. Keeni received a PhD in physics from Tohoku University. She serves on the advisory panel of the NASSCOM quality forum, the advisory board of IEEE Software, and the AUEB MBA International Program business advisory council. A senior member of the IEEE and a certified examiner for JRD-QV, Keeni is an SEI-authorized instructor and lead appraiser for CMMi and a lead appraiser for People CMM. Her current research interests include information security, process improvements, quality management systems, and business excellence. Contact her at gargi@ieee.org.

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Ike Nassi is an executive vice president at SAP. In the course of his career, Nassi has helped to start three com-panies: Encore Computer, InfoGear Technology, and Firetide. He also helped to found the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, where he currently serves as an active member of the Board of Trustees.

Nassi has held executive positions at Digital Equipment Corporation, Cisco Systems, and Apple Computer, where he served as senior vice president of software. He has been a visiting scholar at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley, and a research affiliate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Nassi was a member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's information systems and technology group and received a Certificate for Distinguished Service from the US Department of Defense for his work on the design of the Ada programming language. He is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. Contact him at nassi@nassi.com.

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Tirumale K. Ramesh is a Boeing Technical Fellow in advanced computing and technologies. At Boeing, he led the development of an advanced embedded computing research and distributed simulation architecture, and also developed a technical roadmap. He has held senior positions at Lockheed Martin and IBM, where he led a team of worldwide ASIC high-speed serial core application solutions developers in creating network products.

Ramesh's technical areas of work and expertise include reconfigurable/FPGA computing, embedded hardware and software, and ASIC/system-on-chip. He holds several US and foreign patents. He has received numerous professional recognitions and honors, including Boeing Technical Fellow and the IBM ASIC Design Center Award.

A senior member of the IEEE and a member of the NCO Industry Consortium, Ramesh serves on the Industry Advisory Board of the NSF Center for Reconfigurable Computing. He received a BS in electrical engineering from Bangalore University, an MS in electrical engineering from Mississippi State University, and a PhD in computer engineering from Oakland University. Contact him at tirumale.k.ramesh@boeing.com.

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Bill N. Schilit, associate editor in chief of Computer, is with Google Research. Before joining Google, Schilit was principal scientist with Intel's Digital Home product group, served as codirector of Intel Research Seattle, managed personal computing research at Fuji-Xerox (FXPAL), worked on networked systems at AT&T's Bell Labs, and was part of the team that invented ubiquitous computing at PARC from 1992 to 1995. His interest is ubiquitous computing, with a research focus in the development of smart personal and mobile technologies supporting knowledge work. Schilit received a PhD in computer science from Columbia University. He is an IEEE Fellow and a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the ACM. Contact him at schilit@computer.org.

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Neil G. Siegel is vice president of advanced systems/technology at Northrop Grumman, following a sevenyear tenure there as vice president and general manager of the tactical systems division.

Siegel has made important contributions to many battle command and military weapon systems, including the US Army's Hunter unmanned aerial vehicle and the FBCB2-Blue Force tracking system. He holds several patents in areas that include communications protocols, networking, and computing systems.

Programs for which Siegel was responsible have won several prestigious awards, including recognition from the Institute for Defense and Government Advancement, The Journal of Defense Software Engineering, Federal Computer Week, and Battlespace Information.

Siegel was elected to the US National Academy of Engineering in 2005. Contact him at neil.siegel@ngc.com.

As Red Hat's chief technology officer and vice president of engineering, Brian Stevens leads the strategic direction of the company's product and technology initiatives. He manages the research and development organizations responsible for delivering Linux, virtualization, systems management, security, and messaging/grid strategies.

Stevens began his career at Digital Equipment Corporation, where he was a developer on the first commercial release of the X Windows system. In his 14 years at Digital, he became a senior member of the technical staff, where he was responsible for the architecture and development of the Tru64 OS and TruCluster product lines.

Since joining Red Hat's management team in 2001, Stevens has been critical to the company's enterprise operating system, storage, and virtualization strategies Stevens received a BS in computer science from the University of New Hampshire and an MS in computer systems from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Contact him at bstevens@redhat.com.

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Henry Tirri is a Nokia senior vice president and head of the Nokia Research Center, which drives breakthroughs that reach far into the future, enabling new business opportunities for the company. As head of research, Tirri is responsible for labs worldwide that pursue disruptive innovation. Tirri joined Nokia in 2004 as a research fellow in the software and applications laboratory. As a visiting scientist at NASA Ames Research Center, he made significant technological contributions to the 2003 Mars Rover mission.

Tirri has served as a visiting professor at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley. He received a PhD in computer science from the University of Helsinki. He is the author and coauthor of more than 175 academic papers in various fields of computer science, social sciences, and statistics and holds five patents. Contact him at henry.tirri@nokia.com.

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Jeffrey J. Wilcox is vice president of systems and software engineering for Lockheed Martin's corporate engineering and technology organization.

Wilcox is responsible for directing the development and implementation of enterprise-wide systems and software engineering processes, tools, technology, and training with special attention to complex, software-intensive systems. In this role, he collaborates with technology and engineering leads to ensure the delivery of effective and robust software-intensive products and services. He also addresses systems and software needs throughout the enterprise, supporting the objective of continuously enhancing future capabilities and performance.

Before joining Lockheed Martin, Wilcox enjoyed a successful career at Science Applications International Corporation, where in his role as a senior vice president, he led business planning and analysis for the technology and advanced systems business unit. During his tenure at SAIC, he held positions of increasing responsibility in areas such as advanced weapon systems engineering and the integration of complex sensor systems. Contact him at Jeffrey.j.wilcox@lmco.com.

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About the Authors

Carl K. Chang is chair of the Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University. Contact him at c.chang@computer.org.
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