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ABSTRACT
This study of an iterative, longitudinal deployment of a multipurpose public display examines two mechanisms that help users find the available applications: a quick-launch menu and a browsable application directory. Using the measures of relative and absolute utility, the study reveals these mechanisms' complex effects on application usage.
INDEX TERMS
Bluetooth, Cities and towns, Urban areas, Displays, Context awareness, Games, Interactive systems, Human computer interaction, Information retrieval, Haptic interfaces, Cities and towns,shortcuts, Bluetooth, Cities and towns, Urban areas, Displays, Context awareness, Games, Interactive systems, Human computer interaction, Information retrieval, Haptic interfaces, Cities and towns, information foraging, Bluetooth, Cities and towns, Urban areas, Displays, Context awareness, Games, Interactive systems, Human computer interaction, Information retrieval, Haptic interfaces, Cities and towns, computer graphics, public displays, interactive displays, human-computer interaction, relative utility, absolute utility
CITATION
V. Kostakos, H. Kukka, J. Goncalves, N. Tselios, T. Ojala, "Multipurpose Public Displays: How Shortcut Menus Affect Usage", IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, vol. 33, no. , pp. 56-63, March-April 2013, doi:10.1109/MCG.2012.125
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