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Issue No. 05 - September/October (2002 vol. 22)
ISSN: 0272-1716
pp: 24-36
Guy Godin , Visual Information Technology Group at the National Research Council of Canada
J.-Angelo Beraldin , National Research Council of Canada
John Taylor , Institute for Information Technology, National Research Council of Canada
Luc Cournoyer , National Research Council of Canada
Marc Rioux , Institute for Information Technology, National Research Council of Canada
Sabry El-Hakim , National Research Council of Canada
Réjean Baribeau , National Research Council of Canada
François Blais , National Research Council of Canada
Pierre Boulanger , University of Alberta
Jacques Domey , National Research Council of Canada
Michel Picard , National Research Council of Canada
ABSTRACT
<p>Computer graphics holds the promise of providing virtual and enhanced access to museum collections and archaeological sites. High-resolution digital 3D models of real objects and sites can be acquired using laser range sensors and modeling algorithms, to create virtualized models that convey a faithful appearance of the object and provide information for analysis and study. In this article, the authors describe a number of demonstration projects that were performed in collaboration with museums and conservation agencies. These projects provided a unique setting to test and improve 3D imaging and modeling in the particular context of heritage.</p>
INDEX TERMS
laser range sensing, heritage applications, shape and appearance modeling.
CITATION
Guy Godin, J.-Angelo Beraldin, John Taylor, Luc Cournoyer, Marc Rioux, Sabry El-Hakim, Réjean Baribeau, François Blais, Pierre Boulanger, Jacques Domey, Michel Picard, "Active Optical 3D Imaging for Heritage Applications", IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, vol. 22, no. , pp. 24-36, September/October 2002, doi:10.1109/MCG.2002.1028724
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