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Displaying 1-14 out of 14 total
Tactile Perception of Rotational Sliding
Found in: World Haptics Conference
By William R. Provancher, Brandt D. Erickson, Federico Barbagli, Hong Z. Tan
Issue Date:March 2007
pp. 127-132
We present a new tactile display for rendering rotational friction at the fingertips. To inform the design and control of this device, we have conducted an initial set of perceptual experiments to investigate perceptual thresholds for rates of rotational s...
 
Haptic Display of Contact Location
Found in: Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, International Symposium on
By Katherine J. Kuchenbecker, William R. Provancher, G├╝nter Niemeyer, Mark R. Cutkosky
Issue Date:March 2004
pp. 40-47
This work presents a new haptic device that integrates contact location feedback with grounded point-force display. The system consists of a thimble-based mechanism attached to the endpoint of a Phantom® robotic arm. Contact location is rendered using a sm...
 
Exploration of Tactile Contact in a Haptic Display: Effects of Contact Velocity and Transient Vibrations
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Brian T. Gleeson, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:April 2011
pp. 88-99
Experiments were conducted using a novel tactile contact rendering device to explore important factors of the tactile contact event. The effects of contact velocity and event-based transient vibrations were explored. Our research was motivated by a need to...
 
Haptic Edge Sharpness Perception with a Contact Location Display
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Jaeyoung Park,Andrew J. Doxon,William R. Provancher,David E. Johnson,Hong Z. Tan
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 323-331
The effect of contact location information on virtual edge perception was investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants discriminated edge sharpness under force-alone and force-plus-contact-location conditions using a 4.8 mm radius contact...
 
Perception of Direction for Applied Tangential Skin Displacement: Effects of Speed, Displacement, and Repetition
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Brian T. Gleeson, Scott K. Horschel, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:July 2010
pp. 177-188
A variety of tasks could benefit from the availability of direction cues that do not rely on vision or sound. The application of tangential skin displacement at the fingertip has been found to be a reliable means of communicating direction and has potentia...
 
Mobile Navigation Using Haptic, Audio, and Visual Direction Cues with a Handheld Test Platform
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Rebecca L. Koslover,Brian T. Gleeson,Joshua T. de Bever,William R. Provancher
Issue Date:January 2012
pp. 33-38
This paper reports on a series of user experiments evaluating the design of a multimodal test platform capable of rendering visual, audio, vibrotactile, and directional skin-stretch stimuli. The test platform is a handheld, wirelessly controlled device tha...
 
Improved Tactile Shear Feedback: Tactor Design and an Aperture-Based Restraint
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Brian T. Gleeson,Charles A. Stewart,William R. Provancher
Issue Date:October 2011
pp. 253-262
Tactile feedback could replace or augment visual and auditory communication in a range of important applications. This paper advances the field of tactile communication by presenting performance data on a variety of tactors and a finger restraint that is s...
 
Fingerpad Skin Stretch Increases the Perception of Virtual Friction
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By William R. Provancher, Nicholas D. Sylvester
Issue Date:October 2009
pp. 212-223
This research focuses on the relative importance of fingerpad skin stretch on the perception of friction. It is hypothesized that the perceived magnitude of friction rendered by traditional force feedback can be increased through the addition of fingertip ...
 
Communication of direction through lateral skin stretch at the fingertip
Found in: World Haptics Conference
By Brian T. Gleeson, Scott K. Horschel, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:March 2009
pp. 172-177
A variety of tasks could benefit from the availability of direction cues that do not rely on vision or sound. Skin stretch has been found to be a reliable means of communicating direction and has potential to be rendered by a compact device. We have conduc...
 
Toward Developing a Velocity Controlled Tactile Impact Display
Found in: Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, International Symposium on
By Brian T. Gleeson, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:March 2008
pp. 373-374
This paper presents a novel impact display capable of rendering impact on a fingertip over a range of velocities commonly experienced during everyday manipulation and tactile exploration. An optical range sensor is used to measure the separation between th...
 
Effects of Longitudinal Skin Stretch on the Perception of Friction
Found in: World Haptics Conference
By Nicholas D. Sylvester, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:March 2007
pp. 373-378
This work focuses on the relative importance of skin stretch imposed on the fingerpad on the perception of friction. Perceptual data is presented from two separate tests. The first experiment was designed to determine the perceptual thresholds for friction...
 
A fingertip shear tactile display for communicating direction cues
Found in: World Haptics Conference
By Scott K. Horschel, Brian T. Gleeson, William R. Provancher
Issue Date:March 2009
pp. 611-612
Fingertip skin stretch has been found by our lab to be a reliable means for communicating direction. This demonstration will consist of two different parts to illustrate this means of communication. The first part of the demonstration will give participant...
 
Planar Hand Motion Guidance UsingFingertip Skin-Stretch Feedback
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Sumner L. Norman,Andrew J. Doxon,Brian T. Gleeson,William R. Provancher
Issue Date:April 2014
pp. 121-130
In this paper, we show that a simple haptic device can accurately guide users through planar hand movements. The device guides the user through skin stretch feedback on the fingerpad of the user's index finger. In an angle matching test evaluating two type...
 
Human Detection and Discrimination of Tactile Repeatability, Mechanical Backlash, and Temporal Delay in a Combined Tactile-Kinesthetic Haptic Display System
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
By Andrew J. Doxon,David E. Johnson,Hong Z. Tan,William R. Provancher
Issue Date:October 2013
pp. 453-463
Many of the devices used in haptics research are over-engineered for the task and are designed with capabilities that go far beyond human perception levels. Designing devices that more closely match the limits of human perception will make them smaller, le...
 
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