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Displaying 1-30 out of 30 total
The Commercialization of Database Management Systems, 1969–1983
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas J. Bergin, Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2009
pp. 26-41
<p>Database management systems were the most important commercial software packages of the 1970s. The authors reconstruct their early history by examining the evolution of their capabilities and installed base. They also document early user experienc...
 
John R. Rice: Mathematical Software Pioneer
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2010
pp. 72-81
<p>John Rischard Rice is one of the founders of mathematical software as a distinct scholarly community. Trained in mathematics he spent four decades in Purdue's Department of Computer Sciences. During the 1970s he convened a series of seminal confer...
 
Computing the American Way: Contextualizing the Early US Computer Industry
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 8-20
<p>Drawing on work from business, social, and labor history, this article reinterprets the early domestic US computer industry in its broader economic and political context. Contrary to popular imagination, the early computer industry emerges as one ...
 
Events and Sightings
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Chigusa Kita,Thomas Haigh,Dag Spicer,Akihiko Yamada,Thomas J. Misa
Issue Date:April 2008
pp. 64-67
Fifty Years of the History of Technology; Computer History Museum Report; Abacus Exhibition in Japan; Charles Babbage Institute News
 
Charles W. Bachman: Database Software Pioneer
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2011
pp. 70-80
A biography of Charles W. Bachman, Turing Award winner and a primary inventor of the database management system through his early 1960s work on the Integrated Data Store (IDS). He worked for Dow Chemical, Generarl Electric, Honeywell and Cullinae Database ...
 
How Data Got its Base: Information Storage Software in the 1950s and 1960s
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2009
pp. 6-25
<p>Generalized report generation and file maintenance programs were widely used in the 1950s, standardized by the Share user group with 9PAC and Surge. By the 1960s the first recognizable DBMS systems, such IMS and IDS, had evolved to address the cha...
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Jack Dongarra ,Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:April 2008
pp. 74-81
Jack Dongarra, a leader of the high-performance computing community, is cocreator of mathematical software packages including EISPACK, LINPACK, LAPACK, and ScaLAPACK. He is also a University Distinguished Professor at the University of Tennessee.
 
Cleve Moler: Mathematical Software Pioneer and Creator of Matlab
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2008
pp. 87-91
A prominent figure in the numerical analysis community in his early academic career, Cleve Moler gradually shifted his research efforts to mathematical software, specifically to the development of Matlab, an educational software package. Matlab has evolved...
 
Software in the 1960s as Concept, Service, and Product
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2002
pp. 5-13
<p>Packaged application software established a small but important corporate niche during the 1960s. The author charts the shifting meaning of the word software, situates the first software companies within the overall computer services market, and p...
 
Reconsidering the Stored-Program Concept
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh,Mark Priestley,Crispin Rope
Issue Date:January 2014
pp. 4-17
The first in a three-part series in IEEE Annals, this article gives a historical explanation of the endemic confusion surrounding the stored-program concept. The authors suggest the adoption of more precisely defined alternatives to capture specific aspect...
 
Remembering the Office of the Future: The Origins of Word Processing and Office Automation
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2006
pp. 6-31
Word processing entered the American office in 1970 as an idea about reorganizing typists, but its meaning soon shifted to describe computerized text editing. The designers of word processing systems combined existing technologies to exploit the falling co...
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2005
pp. 93-96
Kenneth Iverson, whose dissatisfaction with conventional mathematical notation as a graduate student led to the development of the APL and J languages, died in Toronto, Ontario on 19 October 2004 in his 84th year. This article reviews his early education, ...
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:April 2005
pp. 89-94
No summary available.
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2005
pp. 67-73
No summary available.
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2004
pp. 79-91
<div>Richard L. (Rick) Crandall</div><div>Larry A. Welke</div><p><em>Editor's Note</em>: The two biographies presented in this issue are part of an ongoing examination of the development of the computer software an...
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2004
pp. 78-93
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Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh, Maurice Wilkes
Issue Date:October 2003
pp. 89-92
No summary available.
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:April 2003
pp. 86-92
No summary available.
 
Biographies
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2003
pp. 80-87
No summary available.
 
The Chromium-Plated Tabulator: Institutionalizing an Electronic Revolution, 1954-1958
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:October 2001
pp. 75-104
<p>The computer promised business of the 1950s an administrative revolution. What it delivered was data processing-a hybrid of new technology and existing punched card machines, people, and attitudes. The author examines how first-generation computer...
 
Extending The Non-Interference Version Of MLS For Sat
Found in: Security and Privacy, IEEE Symposium on
By J. Thomas Haigh, William D. Young
Issue Date:April 1986
pp. 231
A non-interference formulation ofMLS applicable to the Secure Ada Target (SAT) Abstract Model is developed. An analogous formulation is developed to handle the SAT type enforcement policy. Unwinding theorems are presented for both MLS and Multi-Domain Secu...
 
An Experience Using Two Covert Channel Analysis Techniques On a Real System Design
Found in: Security and Privacy, IEEE Symposium on
By J. Thomas Haigh, Richard A. Kemmerer, John McHugh, William D. Young
Issue Date:April 1986
pp. 14
This paper examines the application of two covert channel analysis techniques to a high level design for a real system the Honeywell Secure Ada Target (SAT). The techniques used were a version of the non-interference model of multilevel security due to Gog...
 
Trapping Malicious Insiders in the SPDR Web
Found in: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
By J. Thomas Haigh, Steven A. Harp, Richard O'Brien, Johnathan Gohde, John Maraist, Charles N. Payne
Issue Date:January 2009
pp. 1-10
The insider threat has assumed increasing importance as our dependence on critical cyber information infrastructure has increased. In this paper we describe an approach for thwarting and attributing insider attacks. The Sense, Prepare, Detect, and React (S...
   
Engineering "The Miracle of the ENIAC": Implementing the Modern Code Paradigm
Found in: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
By Thomas Haigh,Mark Priestley,Crispin Rope
Issue Date:April 2014
pp. 41-59
In 1947 John von Neumann had the idea of converting ENIAC to the new style of programming first described in his celebrated "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC." By April 1948, Nick Metropolis, building on plans developed by Adele Goldstine and...
 
Actually, Turing did not invent the computer
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2014
pp. 36-41
Separating the origins of computer science and technology.
     
Software and souls; programs and packages
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:September 2013
pp. 31-34
How can historians tell stories about software without focusing solely on the code itself?
     
Five lessons from really good history
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2013
pp. 37-40
Lessons learned from four award-winning books on the history of information technology.
     
Seven lessons from bad history
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 26-29
Journalists, historians, and the invention of email.
     
The IBM PC: from beige box to industry standard
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Thomas Haigh
Issue Date:January 2012
pp. 35-37
Looking back at three decades of PC platform evolution.
     
The case for prevention-based, host-resident defenses in the modern PCS network
Found in: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Challenges and Strategies (CSIIRW '09)
By Charles Payne, J. Thomas Haigh, Richard C. O'Brien
Issue Date:April 2009
pp. 1-7
The process control system (PCS) owner can no longer rely on a physical air gap and custom hardware to protect her network from attack. Demand for greater visibility into PCS operations, coupled with greater use of commodity hardware, now exposes the PCS n...
     
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