Search For:

Displaying 1-17 out of 17 total
Organizing self-organizing teams
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Rashina Hoda,James Noble,Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:May 2010
pp. 285-294
Agile teams are described as
 
Towards end-user web software visualization
Found in: Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, IEEE Symposium on
By Craig Anslow, James Noble, Stuart Marshall, Ewan Tempero
Issue Date:September 2008
pp. 256-257
Software visualization has always been expensive, special purpose, and hard to program. Most of the existing software visualization tools require too much time for end-user developers to learn and make effective use of. We are currently building a web soft...
 
Self-Organizing Roles on Agile Software Development Teams
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
By Rashina Hoda,James Noble,Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:March 2013
pp. 422-444
Self-organizing teams have been recognized and studied in various forms—as autonomous groups in socio-technical systems, enablers of organizational theories, agents of knowledge management, and as examples of complex-adaptive systems. Over the l...
 
Sharing Human-Computer Interaction and Software Engineering Design Artifacts
Found in: Computer-Human Interaction, Australasian Conference on
By Judy Brown, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:December 1998
pp. 53
Software Engineering (SE) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) disciplines typically have separate processes and design artifacts. This paper describes a co-evolutionary design process, which incorporates both SE and HCI processes, and indicates how design...
 
SourceVis: Collaborative software visualization for co-located environments
Found in: 2013 First IEEE Working Conference on Software Visualization (VISSOFT)
By Craig Anslow,Stuart Marshall,James Noble,Robert Biddle
Issue Date:September 2013
pp. 1-10
Most software development tools and applications are designed from a single-user perspective and are bound to the desktop and Integrated Development Environments (IDEs). These tools and applications make it hard for developers to analyse and interact with ...
   
SourceVis: a tool for multi-touch software visualization
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces (ITS '11)
By Craig Anslow, James Noble, Robert Biddle, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:November 2011
pp. 264-265
Most software visualization systems and tools are designed from a single-user perspective and are bound to the desktop and Integrated Development Environments (IDEs). These design decisions do not allow users to easily navigate through software visualizati...
     
Grounded theory for geeks
Found in: Proceedings of the 18th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP '11)
By James Noble, Rashina Hoda, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:October 2011
pp. 1-17
Grounded Theory (GT) is gaining popularity as research method in Software Engineering; however, it is still not widely understood. We present some patterns based on the use of GT to study Software Engineering contexts including our own experiences of apply...
     
Lessons learnt from collaboratively creating maps on a touch table
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference of the New Zealand Chapter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (CHINZ '11)
By Hien Tran, Mairead de Roiste, Alex Potanin, Craig Anslow, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:July 2011
pp. 105-108
While touch tables have improved support for creative, co-located, collaborative tasks, the very act of studying what groups create on such tables (and how) remains non-trivially difficult. We developed an experimental tool to study what map designs would ...
     
Agility in context
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM international conference on Object oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA '10)
By James Noble, Philippe Kruchten, Rashina Hoda, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:October 2010
pp. 74-88
Evangelists for Agile methods strongly encourage all projects to follow every practice of their chosen method. Based on a Grounded Theory study involving 40 participants at 16 organizations, and corroborated by 4 independent case studies, we argue that dev...
     
How much is just enough?: some documentation patterns on Agile projects
Found in: Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP '10)
By James Noble, Rashina Hoda, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:July 2010
pp. 1-13
Agile methods advocate "just enough" documentation on Agile projects. Unfortunately, there are no clear guidelines on what is "just enough" documentation. We describe a set of patterns to help Agile software development teams define "just enough" in their ...
     
Balancing acts: walking the Agile tightrope
Found in: Proceedings of the 2010 ICSE Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering (CHASE '10)
By James Noble, Rashina Hoda, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:May 2010
pp. 5-12
Self-organizing teams are one of the critical success factors on Agile projects - and yet, little is known about the self-organizing nature of Agile teams and the challenges they face in industrial practice. Based on a Grounded Theory study of 40 Agile pra...
     
Remotely shooting asteroids on our mobile phone
Found in: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference NZ Chapter of the ACM's Special Interest Group on Human-Computer Interaction (CHINZ '09)
By Ian Welch, Stuart Marshall, Vipul Delwadia
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 45-52
The New Zealand software industry developed numerous games and applications during the last decades of the twentieth century. These games and applications --- our digital culture --- are now becoming inaccessible and lost due to preservation and copyright ...
     
Visualizing the word structure of Java class names
Found in: Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA Companion '08)
By Craig Anslow, Ewan Tempero, James Noble, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:October 2008
pp. 186-189
Large amounts of software have been written since the Java language was created. There is little known about the word structure Java within class names. We have created visualizations of words used in class names from the Java API specification and 91 open...
     
Web software visualization using extensible 3D (X3D) graphics
Found in: Proceedings of the 4th ACM symposium on Software visuallization (SoftVis '08)
By Craig Anslow, James Noble, Robert Biddle, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:September 2008
pp. 7-8
3D web software visualization has always been expensive, special purpose, and hard to program. Most of the technologies used require large amounts of scripting, are not reliable on all platforms, are binary formats, or no longer maintained. We can make web...
     
VET3D: a tool for execution trace web 3D visualization
Found in: Companion to the 21st ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming languages, systems, and applications (OOPSLA '06)
By Craig Anslow, James Noble, Robert Biddle, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:October 2006
pp. 655-656
We are interested in finding new ways to visualize our software execution traces. An issue in visualizing our execution traces is deploying and integrating them into users' environments. We have a tool called VET3D that transforms execution traces into vis...
     
Evaluating X3D for use in software visualization
Found in: Proceedings of the 2006 ACM symposium on Software visualization (SoftVis '06)
By Craig Anslow, James Noble, Robert Biddle, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:September 2006
pp. 161-162
There are many technologies that have varying capabilities that could be used to help understand software through visualizations. Determining which technology is best suited for the development and delivery of a particular type of software visualization ca...
     
Reuse of debuggers for visualization of reuse
Found in: Proceedings of the 1999 symposium on Software reusability (SSR '99)
By Ewan Tempero, John Miller-Williams, Robert Biddle, Stuart Marshall
Issue Date:May 1999
pp. 92-100
Ensuring that object technology will achieve its promise of significant software reuse requires that special attention be paid to a combination of people, process and technology issues. Reuse will not happen automatically. The panelists will describe their...
     
 1