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Displaying 1-38 out of 38 total
Science and Engineering Databases in an Open-Source Software World
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, Dante Choi
Issue Date:May 2003
pp. 10-13
<p>Storing and organizing scientific and engineering information is a natural application for databases. But database designs and systems have conventionally been driven by the business-application market, especially by large businesses. The characte...
 
A Modern Tower of Babel
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2009
pp. 80
Former editor in chief Norman Chonacky waxes lyrical about the trials and tribulations involved in—along with the importance of—learning a new computer language.
 
We're Listening to You! Results from Our Recent Reader Survey
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:May 2006
pp. 46-53
We recently completed a readership survey that was tied to a Technology Review article published in the May/June and July/August 2005 issues of CiSE. This report is part of our effort to engage readers in the iterative process of improving the usefulness o...
 
3Ms: A Response
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:September 2005
pp. 7-9
This seems like as good a time as any to stop and catch our collective breaths during the ongoing reviews of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab in this department. We understand and acknowledge that we aren't experts in any one of these three packages (let alo...
 
3Ms for Instruction, Part 2: Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:July 2005
pp. 14-23
Our intent with this Technology Review is to present a framework that helps educators make their own critical comparison of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab as candidate computational productivity tools for use in their instructional programs. This is an alt...
 
Technology Reviews: 3Ms for Instruction: Reviews of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:May 2005
pp. 7-13
Most CiSE readers have probably used Maple, Mathematica, or Matlab for several years. With this review series, our goal is to help you now decide whether one of the others is better suited to your temperament and current practice than your original choice....
 
Reviews of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab: Coming Soon to a Publication Near You
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:March 2005
pp. 9-10
In our introductory article to our upcoming review series on Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab, we asked for feedback. The letters to the editor we subsequently received deliver two messages: first, that this review series will serve a real need, and second, ...
 
Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab: The 3M's without the Tape
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, David Winch
Issue Date:January 2005
pp. 8-16
To begin this new series of Technology Reviews, the authors explore the three preeminent productivity tools for scientific and engineering computation. The forthcoming series will compare the tools in areas they overlap and contrast their scopes in areas w...
 
Stella: Growing Upward, Downward, and Outward
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2004
pp. 8-15
In this article, I?ll review Stella's modeling capabilities for both research and instruction. I?ll describe the basic modeling tools using my student?s quest as a simple, illustrative case study, exploring how these tools contribute to speed and efficienc...
 
Caveat Emptor: What to Know Before Trying to Beat a Consumer System into a Scientific Instrument
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Joseph DiDio III, Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2004
pp. 5-11
<p>When flexibility is possible or desired and cost is paramount, commercial-off-the-shelf products might be suitable and preferable for scientific applications--as long as you are willing to take the time to investigate and flesh out the inadequacie...
 
Books
Found in: Computing in Science & Engineering
By Norman Chonacky,George F. Luger
Issue Date:July 2012
pp. 6-10
In the first book review, “Programming from the Bottom Up,”, Norman Chonacky reviews an introductory textbook that considers fundamental computer operations as well as the methods and practices needed to create, use, or manage programs intended for the com...
 
Crosstalk: Computation as a Language for Research Conversations among Scientists and Engineers
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2012
pp. 9-11
Computation bridges analytic theory to experimentation in science. This issue reminds us that it also bridges between disciplines.
 
Computation in Modern Physics
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 6-7
Norman Chonacky reviews Computation in Modern Physics.
 
Turning a Page and Learning Something Useful
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:March 2008
pp. 4-5
Editor-in-chief Norman Chonacky ponders the year ahead for CiSE magazine and describes how far we've come in the past 12 months. Editorial board member Jack Dongarra also supplies a short tribute to Gene Golub about the recently deceased pioneer's contribu...
 
The Web: For Sharing or Snaring?
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:November 2007
pp. 3-4
Editor-in-chief Norman Chonacky explores Web technology and its implications for CiSE magazine, in particular.
 
Musings on a Metaphysics of Modeling
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:September 2007
pp. 2-3
Editor-in-chief Norman Chonacky explains how CiSE magazine meets a metaphysics mandate in the world of computational science and science for engineering.
 
The Past, Present, and Future
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:July 2007
pp. 2-3
Editor-in-chief Norman Chonacky describes the current editorial board and his plans for balancing out the two communities that CiSE serves, computational scientists and scientists who use computation.
 
You're Recommending What?!
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2007
pp. 2
EIC Norman Chonacky explains what new technologies readers can expect thanks to the magazine's recent editorial board meeting.
 
The Neutrino Strikes Again
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:March 2007
pp. 2
The editor in chief describes how the conferences he's attended so far this year will affect our editorial calendar offerings in the latter half of 2007.
 
The Year that Was . and Yet to Be
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2007
pp. 3-5
The editor in chief rings in the new year by describing the various changes he's implemented for 2007, including adding new department editors, changing department titles, and starting a new horizontal track to cover the International Polar Year.
 
Novelty, Utility, . and More
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:November 2006
pp. 3
CiSE is a magazine, not a journal. I'll give two examples of what I mean by the difference, which should hopefully help correct some common misunderstandings both for those preparing manuscripts to submit for publication and for those who volunteer to refe...
 
Has Computing Changed Physics Courses?
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:September 2006
pp. 4-5
As one who began using computers in physics instruction starting way back in 1970, I must confess that the excitement of that odd band of physics professors who were my fellow enthusiasts was somewhat misplaced. What then appeared to be wild dreams has bec...
 
A Change of Landscape and a Broadened Scope
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:July 2006
pp. 4-5
I've promised you that CiSE would be broadening its scope during my term as editor in chief, and this issue marks the start of a new chapter in this effort. Sometimes, in seeking the new, we re-encounter the old in the course of our exploration and are sur...
 
Evolution: It's not Just for Biology
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2006
pp. 2
During the past year, I've endeavored to take stock of the current state of computing in science and engineering research and education. From this, I've concluded that CiSE's scope is very much in line with the range of current praxis and that our mission,...
 
And Now.
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:March 2006
pp. 2
In my end-of-the-year message in the November/December 2005 issue, I listed the items that I had made major priorities during my first year as editor in chief and gave an overview of how I've grappled with them throughout the year. I characterized this as ...
 
Special Thanks to CiSE's Peer Reviewers
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2006
pp. 14
No summary available.
 
The Spread Spectrum in Computing
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2006
pp. 2-3
From time to time, I find it necessary to remind myself of how broadly computing applications are spread across the sciences and engineering. This breadth extends not only along the axes of computing complexity and disciplinary diversity, but also along ta...
 
From the Editors: This Is the Year that Was
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:November 2005
pp. 4
The first year of my tenure as Editor in Chief has concluded, so I think it's appropriate to reflect on what has transpired over the past six issues in light of what I originally envisioned. Several points from my first EIC message synopsize what I had in ...
 
Lots of Headroom
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:September 2005
pp. 2
I spent a pleasant afternoon at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics (CLEO/QUELs) in Baltimore this June. Having only a relatively short time to spend, I decided to try a quick experiment-cruise the aisles of the poster session, ...
 
Over-the-Horizon: Not Just for Radar Anymore
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:July 2005
pp. 4-5
A few months ago, I heard an interesting colloquium by John Hopcroft, one of the preeminent thinkers in the area of theoretical computer science. His talk mirrored his current investigative passion--future directions in theoretical computer science--but hi...
 
The Way Forward: Learning from Our Past
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2005
pp. 2
Testimony from past readers drives this issue's content and approach. High on their wish list are a greater emphasis on science content, a more tutorial approach to computation, and a stronger, more utilitarian character. These are appropriate because scie...
 
Staking New Ground
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:March 2005
pp. 3-4
In the last issue, I outlined my development priorities for moving CiSE to the next level--community, content, and approach. In this message, I want to describe our first steps on the way forward along each of these paths.
 
From the Editors: An Evolving Mission
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2005
pp. 3-4
It is my privilege, as the incoming editor in chief, to extend a sincere thanks to Francis Sullivan for the excellent job he has done over the past four years at CiSE's helm. As part of my transitional education, Francis shared his wisdom concerning the ma...
 
Guest Editor's Introduction: Scientific Databases
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2003
pp. 14-15
<p>Over the past three decades, shared scientific databases have evolved from the narrow con.nes of critically analyzed measurement tables (such as properties of materials) to collections of records covering a larger scientific scope (such as real-ti...
 
Computers for Integrative Instruction in Bioengineering
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky, Mitchell Lit
Issue Date:September 2001
pp. 73-83
The authors review the work of two biomedical engineering departments that use computers in their laboratory courses to integrate labs into the broader curricula. The review is set in the context of other related developments in current BME research practi...
 
Ten Years and Counting?
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:July 2008
pp. 3
The articles in this issue cover mechanics, biology, and laboratory applications, and three cover computation per se. Moreover, they're evenly divided between the two categories of CiSE readers. CiSE thus seems to be fulfilling its mission of establishing ...
 
Back to the Future?
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:May 2008
pp. 3-4
Editor-in-chief Norman Chonacky draws attention to Greg Wilson's argument that we aren't preparing students to be computationalists who will be able to call their work science.
 
Where in this World Are You?
Found in: Computing in Science and Engineering
By Norman Chonacky
Issue Date:January 2008
pp. 3-6
CiSE's editor in chief, Norman Chonacky, describes some recent events that underscore the relevance of CiSE's mission. This piece also features an interview with the magazine's cover artist, Dirk Hagner.
 
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