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Displaying 1-12 out of 12 total
Analysis on Multilingual Discussion for Wikipedia Translation
Found in: International Conference on Culture and Computing
By Linsi Xia,Naomi Yamashita,Toru Ishida
Issue Date:October 2011
pp. 104-109
In current Wikipedia translation activities, most translation tasks are performed by bilingual speakers who have high language skills and specialized knowledge of the articles. Unfortunately, compared to the large amount of Wikipedia articles, the number o...
 
Understanding the conflicting demands of family caregivers caring for depressed family members
Found in: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '13)
By Hideaki Kuzuoka, Keiji Hirata, Naomi Yamashita, Takashi Kudo
Issue Date:April 2013
pp. 2637-2646
Depression is one of the most common disabilities in developed countries. Despite its often devastating impact on families, scant research has focused on how to facilitate the well-being of family caregivers. The aim of this paper is to uncover the challen...
     
Embedded interaction: The accomplishment of actions in everyday and video-mediated environments
Found in: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI)
By Grace Eden, Naomi Yamashita
Issue Date:March 2013
pp. 1-22
A concern with “embodied action” has informed both the analysis of everyday action through technologies and also suggested ways of designing innovative systems. In this article, we consider how these two programs, the analysis of everyday embod...
     
Lost in transmittance: how transmission lag enhances and deteriorates multilingual collaboration
Found in: Proceedings of the 2013 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '13)
By Andy Echenique, Ari Hautasaari, Naomi Yamashita, Toru Ishida
Issue Date:February 2013
pp. 923-934
Previous research has shown that audio communication is particularly difficult for non-native speakers (NNS) during multilingual collaborations. Especially when audio signals become distorted, NNS are overburdened by not only having to communicate with imp...
     
Supporting fluid tabletop collaboration across distances
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Hideaki Kuzuoka, Keiji Hirata, Naomi Yamashita, Shigemi Aoyagi, Yoshinari Shirai
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2827-2836
In this study, we examine how remote collaborators' upper body view affects collaboration when people engage in multiparty fluid tabletop activities across distances. We experimentally investigated the effects of upper body view on four-person group tablet...
     
Hands on hitchcock: embodied reference to a moving scene
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Christian Heath, Hideaki Kuzuoka, Naomi Yamashita, Paul Luff
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 43-52
In this paper we report on some experiments with a high fidelity media space, t-Room, an immersive system that presents full scale, real-time images of co-participants who are in similar spaces many miles apart. Although being designed to provide a coheren...
     
Improving visibility of remote gestures in distributed tabletop collaboration
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2011 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '11)
By Hideaki Kuzuoka, Katsuhiko Kaji, Keiji Hirata, Naomi Yamashita
Issue Date:March 2011
pp. 95-104
Collaborative distributed tabletop activities involving real objects are complicated by invisibility factors introduced into the workspace. In this paper, we propose a technique called "remote lag" to alleviate the problems caused by the invisibility of re...
     
Difficulties in establishing common ground in multiparty groups using machine translation
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '09)
By Hideaki Kuzuoka, Naomi Yamashita, Rieko Inaba, Toru Ishida
Issue Date:April 2009
pp. 1-4
When people communicate in their native languages using machine translation, they face various problems in constructing common ground. This study investigates the difficulties of constructing common ground when multiparty groups (consisting of more than tw...
     
Impact of seating positions on group video communication
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2008 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '08)
By Hideaki Kuzuoka, Keiji Hirata, Naomi Yamashita, Shigemi Aoyagi, Yasunori Harada
Issue Date:November 2008
pp. 21-27
In this study, we examine how changes in seating position across different sites affect video-mediated communication. We experimentally investigated the effects of altering seating positions on conversations in four-person group communication, two-by-two a...
     
How coherent environments support remote gestures
Found in: Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces (AVI '08)
By Keiji Hirata, Naomi Yamashita, Toshihiro Takada, Yasunori Harada
Issue Date:May 2008
pp. 1-29
Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of providing users with a coherent environment across distant sites. To date, it remains unclear how such an environment affects people's gestures and their comprehension. In this study, we investigate how ...
     
Effects of machine translation on collaborative work
Found in: Proceedings of the 2006 20th anniversary conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '06)
By Naomi Yamashita, Toru Ishida
Issue Date:November 2006
pp. 515-524
Even though multilingual communities that use machine translation to overcome language barriers are increasing, we still lack a complete understanding of how machine translation affects communication. In this study, eight pairs from three different languag...
     
Automatic prediction of misconceptions in multilingual computer-mediated communication
Found in: Proceedings of the 11th international conference on Intelligent user interfaces (IUI '06)
By Naomi Yamashita, Toru Ishida
Issue Date:January 2006
pp. 62-69
Multilingual communities using machine translation to overcome language barriers are showing up with increasing frequency. However, when a large number of translation errors get mixed into conversations, users have difficulty completely understanding each ...
     
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