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Displaying 1-24 out of 24 total
Retrospectives on Peopleware
Found in: International Conference on Software Engineering Companion
By Steven Fraser, Barry Boehm, Fred Brooks Jr., Tom DeMarco, Tim Lister, Linda Rising, Ed Yourdon
Issue Date:May 2007
pp. 21-24
Since its publication twenty years ago,
 
A Final Word about Stories
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:March 2014
pp. 14-17
It was May 2010 when my "call for insights" first appeared in this magazine. For nearly four years, you, gentle readers, have responded to that call and have shared your experiences, challenges, and learnings. I appreciate all of you who submitte...
 
Why Can't We All Play Nice?
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 7-10
This article is based on the author's research in stereotyping and collaboration—the two opposing forces that work to prevent and support the building of great teams. It was only late in her long career that she realized how important the &#...
 
The Benefit of Patterns
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 15-17
Does the real power of patterns lie not in the extraordinary solutions an expert provides but in the pattern writer's ability to capture deep insight into the simple, ordinary, basic structures that support good decision-making? This article provides two e...
 
What Programmers Should Know
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:July 2010
pp. 15-17
An introduction to a new series of articles, inviting readers to share stories, both project and life experiences, and lessons learned.
 
Telling Our Stories
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:May 2010
pp. 6-7
An introduction to a new series of articles, inviting readers to share stories, both project and life experiences, and lessons learned.
 
Understanding the Power of Abstraction in Patterns
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:July 2007
pp. 46-51
This unusual experience report about mining and documenting patterns describes lessons learned from writing a set of patterns. Many times, pattern stories report on an author's expertise and creation of a set of patterns and their application in that area ...
 
The Scrum Software Development Process for Small Teams
Found in: IEEE Software
By Linda Rising, Norman S. Janoff
Issue Date:July 2000
pp. 26-32
In today's software development environment, requirements often change during the product development life cycle to meet shifting business demands, creating endless headaches for development teams. These authors from AG Communications Systems discuss their...
 
Patterns in Postmortems
Found in: Computer Software and Applications Conference, Annual International
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:October 1999
pp. 314
The lessons documented in project postmortems can be captured as patterns to ensure that future projects avoid the mistakes of the past and profit from what worked well. Two examples of patterns from postmortems are described in this paper.
 
Patterns for sustainable development
Found in: Proceedings of the 17th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLOP '10)
By Karl Rehmer, Linda Rising
Issue Date:October 2010
pp. 1-11
This pattern writing project began with the discovery of a small paperback book called Two Ears of Corn by Roland Bunch.
     
Additional patterns for fearless change III
Found in: Proceedings of the 17th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLOP '10)
By Linda Rising, Mary Lynn Manns
Issue Date:October 2010
pp. 1-14
The patterns in this collection are an addition to those that appeared in Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas. Our passion for this topic didn't end when the book was published. Rather, we continue to read, observe, take extensive notes and...
     
Escaped from the lab: innovation practices in large organizations
Found in: Companion to the 23rd ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object oriented programming systems languages and applications (OOPSLA Companion '08)
By Bill Opdyke, David A. Owens, Dennis Mancl, Dirk Riehle, Ethan Hadar, Linda Rising, Steven Fraser
Issue Date:October 2008
pp. 186-189
What are the effective practices for taking new ideas and innovating them into products based on software while avoiding the challenge of under-delivering on too high expectations? Often, the feasibility of The Grand project is assumed based on scope/scale...
     
A fishbowl with piranhas: coalescence, convergence or divergence?
Found in: Companion to the 21st ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming languages, systems, and applications (OOPSLA '06)
By Alistair Cockburn, Dave Thomas, David Hussman, Jutta Eckstein, Linda Rising, Mark Striebeck, Randy Miller, Scott Ambler, Steven Fraser
Issue Date:October 2006
pp. 937-939
Agile software development practices including XP and Scrum have risen to prominence within the software engineering community over the past ten years. Are agile software development practices converging? Are some practices becoming more integrated and/or ...
     
The view: the ultimate IT chat
Found in: Companion to the 19th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems, languages, and applications (OOPSLA '04)
By Jutta Eckstein, Linda Rising, Lise B. Hvatum, Mary Lynn Manns, Nicolai M. Josuttis, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock
Issue Date:October 2004
pp. 151-152
The world is changing; and this is also true for our IT business. Nicolai Josuttis talks with five international extraordinary female representatives of our IT business about the most important, thought-provoking, and funniest IT headlines and tendencies o...
     
The role of the customer in software development: the XP customer - fad or fashion?
Found in: Companion to the 19th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming systems, languages, and applications (OOPSLA '04)
By Angela Martin, David Hussman, Granville Miller, Linda Rising, Mark Striebeck, Mary Poppendieck, Robert Biddle, Steven Fraser
Issue Date:October 2004
pp. 148-150
One of the core XP (Xtreme Programming) practices is that of the "on-site customer". In the words of Kent Beck (2000) in his book "eXtreme Programming Explained" the intent is that a "real customer must sit with the team, available to answer questions, res...
     
Introducing patterns (or any new idea) into organizations (poster session)
Found in: Addendum to the 2000 proceedings of the conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (Addendum) (OOPSLA '00)
By Alan O'Callaghan, Linda Rising, Mary Lynn Manns
Issue Date:January 2000
pp. 135-136
Those who have used patterns are aware that this literary form, and its corresponding process and community support, is providing a way to capture best practices and communicate them throughout organizations and the entire software industry. However, many ...
     
Hacker or hero? - extreme programming today (panel session)
Found in: Addendum to the 2000 proceedings of the conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (Addendum) (OOPSLA '00)
By Kent Beck, Laurie Williams, Linda Rising, Martin Fowler, Ron Crocker, Steven Fraser, Ward Cunningham
Issue Date:January 2000
pp. 5-7
The Educators' Symposium is a unique forum for educators from both academia and industry who have a vested interest in OO education and training. The Educators' Symposium facilitates the exchange of ideas in a number of ways, including featured talks by pr...
     
Non-software examples of PoSA patterns
Found in: Addendum to the 1998 proceedings of the conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (Addendum) (OOPSLA '98 Addendum)
By Linda Rising, Michael Duell, Michael Stal, Peter Sommerlad
Issue Date:January 1998
pp. 150-151
We consider the problem of delivering an effective fine-grained clustering tool to implementors and users of object-oriented database systems. This work emphasizes on-line clustering mechanisms, as contrasted with earlier work that concentrates on clusteri...
     
Non-software examples of software design patterns
Found in: Addendum to the 1997 ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (Addendum) (OOPSLA '97)
By John Goodsen, Linda Rising, Michael Duell
Issue Date:October 1997
pp. 120-124
A new garbage collection algorithm for distributed object systems, called DMOS (Distributed. Mature Object Space), is presented. It is derived from two previous algorithms, MOS (Mature Object Space), sometimes called the train algorithm, and PMOS (Persiste...
     
Tasking troubles and tips (abstract)
Found in: Proceedings of the 1988 ACM sixteenth annual conference on Computer science (CSC '88)
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:February 1988
pp. 729-730
All the problems associated with concurrency in any language are troublesome when using Ada*: deadlock, critical access, race conditions, starvation, abnormal termination and timing errors. In addition, however, programmers in Ada must deal with difficulti...
     
A training experience with patterns
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Brandon Goldfedder, Linda Rising
Issue Date:January 1988
pp. 60-64
The online Risks Forum has long been a hotbed for discussions of the relative merits of openness relating to the dissemination of knowledge about security vulnerabilities. The debate has now been rekindled, and is summarized here.
     
A comparison of two object-oriented design methodologies (abstract only)
Found in: Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computer Science (CSC '87)
By Linda Rising
Issue Date:February 1987
pp. 409
With the increasing use of Ada* in light of DoD Directive 5000.31, “The Ada programming language shall become the single, common, computer programming language for Defense mission-critical applications.” there has been an accompanying increase ...
     
A geometry package in Ada (abstract only)
Found in: Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computer Science (CSC '87)
By Karl Rehmer, Linda Rising
Issue Date:February 1987
pp. 398
Many kinds of applications need the ability to inquire about how some elementary geometric figures relate to one another. In particular, the questions about the location of a point with relation to a geometric object, whether one geometric object is contai...
     
Teaching data abstraction in a beginning Pascal class
Found in: Proceedings of the seventeenth SIGCSE technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE '86)
By Karl Rehmer, Linda Rising
Issue Date:February 1986
pp. 82-85
Modern programming practice advocates the use of abstract data types to aid in design, coding, and maintenance of programs [1]. Many students who are not computer majors will write programs as part of their jobs. Therefore, it is important to expose those ...
     
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