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Architectural Mismatch: Why Reuse Is Still So Hard
Found in: IEEE Software
By David Garlan, Robert Allen, John Ockerbloom
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 66-69
In this article, David Garlan, Robert Allen, and John Ockerbloom reflect on the state of architectural mismatch, a term they coined in their 1995 IEEE Software article,
 
Respectful Type Converters
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
By Jeannette M. Wing, John Ockerbloom
Issue Date:July 2000
pp. 579-593
<p><b>Abstract</b>—In converting an object of one type to another, we expect some of the original object's behavior to remain the same and some to change. How can we state the relationship between the original object and converted object ...
 
Architectural Mismatch: Why Reuse Is So Hard
Found in: IEEE Software
By David Garlan, Robert Allen, John Ockerbloom
Issue Date:November 1995
pp. 17-26
Architectural mismatch stems from mismatched assumptions a reusable part makes about the system structure it is to be part of. These assumptions often conflict with the assumptions of other parts and are almost always implicit, making them extremely diffic...
 
Architectural Mismatch or Why it's hard to build systems out of existing parts
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By David Garlan, Robert Allen, John Ockerbloom
Issue Date:April 1995
pp. 179
Many would argue that future breakthroughs in software productivity will depend on our ability to combine existing pieces of software to produce new applications. An important step towards this goal is the development of new techniques to detect and cope w...
 
Architectural mismatch or why it's hard to build systems out of existing parts
Found in: Proceedings of the 17th international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '95)
By David Garlan, John Ockerbloom, Robert Allen
Issue Date:April 1995
pp. 179-185
One popular use for Haskell in recent years has been as a host language for domain-specific embedded languages. But how can one embed a postfix language in Haskell, given that Haskell only supports prefix and infix syntax? This paper describes several such...
     
Exploiting style in architectural design environments
Found in: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM SIGSOFT symposium on Foundations of software engineering (SIGSOFT '94)
By David Garlan, John Ockerbloom, Robert Allen
Issue Date:December 1994
pp. 100-106
Although many local area networks and operating systems support the use of multicast communications, multicast communications have remained primarily an interesting research tool. However, the growing research interest in multimedia and hypermedia for know...
     
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