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Displaying 1-50 out of 86 total
3D Printing, Smart Cities, Robots, and More
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:January 2014
pp. 6-9
This installment of Notes from the Community covers a wide range of topics, including new gadgets that help you track down lost items, 3D printing, the downside of smart cities, and soldiers growing attached to their robots.
 
Wearable Computing
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:April 2014
pp. 7-9
To give you a preview of IEEE Pervasive Computing's October-December special issue on wearable computing, this installment of Notes from the Community focuses on submissions about wearables. The topics range from the origins of wearable computing to unusua...
 
New Kinds of Gadgets, Interactions, and Ubicomp Visions
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:October 2013
pp. 8-11
This installment of Notes from the Community covers new kinds of gadgets and interactions; innovations in transportation, smart cities, and smartphones; ubicomp and art; and visions of ubicomp.
 
Software engineering, smartphones and health systems, and security warnings
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Greg Linden, Jason Hong, Jason Hong, Jason Hong, Ruben Ortega, Ruben Ortega, Ruben Ortega
Issue Date:January 2010
pp. 16-17
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish excerpts from selected posts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMGreg Lin...
     
Guest Editors' Introduction: Security & Privacy
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong, Mahadev Satyanarayanan, George Cybenko
Issue Date:October 2007
pp. 15-17
Security and privacy concerns touch on all aspects of pervasive computing, including hardware, operating systems, networks, databases, user interfaces, and applications. The seven articles selected for this special issue draw on ideas from many of these fi...
 
Wearable Computing from Jewels to Joules [Guest editors' introduction]
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Mary Baker,Jason Hong,Mark Billinghurst
Issue Date:October 2014
pp. 20-22
Wearables have been with us for a long time, and they're here to stay. Their capabilities and our expectations change with time, but many of the basic problems remain. This issue touches on designing for unpredictable human behavior, positioning sensors, p...
   
Interaction Platforms, Energy Conservation, Behavior Change Research, and More
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:July 2013
pp. 10-13
This installment of Notes from the Community covers new developments in interaction toolkits and platforms, security and privacy, smartphones, power consumption and battery life, and ubicomp education. It also includes a vision of ubicomp's past and future...
 
From GPS Shoes to Instrumented Cities: Food for Thought
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:April 2013
pp. 86-88
Welcome to latest installment of Notes from the Community! This column offers a curated summary of interesting news and research in pervasive and mobile computing, with content drawn from submissions from a shared community on the social news site Reddit, ...
 
What's New in the Ubicomp Community?
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:January 2013
pp. 5-7
Welcome to the inaugural column of Notes from the Community! This column offers a curated summary of interesting news and research in pervasive and mobile computing, with content drawn from submissions from community members and readers. Visit www.reddit.c...
 
Guest Editors' Introduction: Connected Youth
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By John Canny, Jason Hong
Issue Date:July 2010
pp. 10-11
Today's youth are shaping the frontier of digital media in general, and mobile technology in particular. This special issue features applications with a youth focus, studies of how youth are appropriating pervasive technology, and a glimpse of how our live...
 
GRAPHITE: A Visual Query System for Large Graphs
Found in: Data Mining Workshops, International Conference on
By Duen Horng Chau, Christos Faloutsos, Hanghang Tong, Jason I. Hong, Brian Gallagher, Tina Eliassi-Rad
Issue Date:December 2008
pp. 963-966
We present Graphite, a system that allows the user to visually construct a query pattern, finds both its exact and approximate matching subgraphs in large attributed graphs, and visualizes the matches. For example, in a social network where a person's occu...
 
Design Challenges and Principles for Wizard of Oz Testing of Location-Enhanced Applications
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Yang Li, Jason I. Hong, James A. Landay
Issue Date:April 2007
pp. 70-75
Location-enhanced applications are the most widely adopted type of ubicomp application. However, they're hard to design and test. New Wizard of Oz techniques for testing location-enhanced applications allow efficient testing of prototypes in the early stag...
 
Bustle: Using Hitchhiking to Monitor Meaningful Locations
Found in: Mobile Computing Systems and Applications, IEEE Workshop on
By Karen P. Tang, James Fogarty, Pedram Keyani, Jason I. Hong
Issue Date:April 2006
pp. 51
Hitchhiking is a client-focused, software-based approach to anonymous and privacy-sensitive collection of sensed data in location-based applications. In this paper, we demonstrate hitchhiking by implementing a WiFi-based locationcentric service called Bust...
   
Minimizing Security Risks in Ubicomp Systems
Found in: Computer
By Jason I. Hong
Issue Date:December 2005
pp. 118-119
Mobile devices and wireless networks are making existing security models obsolete.
 
Wireless Location Privacy Protection
Found in: Computer
By Bill Schilit, Jason Hong, Marco Gruteser
Issue Date:December 2003
pp. 135-137
<p>Positioning technologies have the potential to intrude on personal privacy.</p>
 
Researchers' big data crisis; understanding design and functionality
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong, Michael Stonebraker, Jason Hong, Michael Stonebraker
Issue Date:February 2012
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Smartphones, Teddy Bears, and Toys
Found in: IEEE Pervasive Computing
By Jason Hong,Mary Baker
Issue Date:July 2014
pp. 5-7
This installment of Notes from the Community is all about technology for locating, sensing, and interacting. Oh, and teddy bears.
 
Mining smartphone data to classify life-facets of social relationships
Found in: Proceedings of the 2013 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '13)
By Jason I. Hong, Jason Wiese, John Zimmerman, Jun-Ki Min
Issue Date:February 2013
pp. 285-294
People engage with many overlapping social networks and enact diverse social roles across different facets of their lives. Unfortunately, many online social networking services reduce most people's contacts to "friend". A richer computational model of rela...
     
Building a dynamic and computational understanding of personal social networks
Found in: Proceedings of the 1st ACM workshop on Mobile systems for computational social science (MCSS '12)
By Jason I. Hong, Jason Wiese, John Zimmerman
Issue Date:June 2012
pp. 5-10
While individuals' personal social networks are extremely important in their day-to-day lives, computational systems lack meaningful representations of them. We argue that recent trends in computer-mediated communication, the ubiquity of smartphones, usage...
     
Are you close with me? are you nearby?: investigating social groups, closeness, and willingness to share
Found in: Proceedings of the 13th international conference on Ubiquitous computing (UbiComp '11)
By Jason I. Hong, Jason Wiese, John Zimmerman, Laura Dabbish, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Patrick Gage Kelley
Issue Date:September 2011
pp. 197-206
As ubiquitous computing becomes increasingly mobile and social, personal information sharing will likely increase in frequency, the variety of friends to share with, and range of information that can be shared. Past work has identified that whom you share ...
     
I'm the mayor of my house: examining why people use foursquare - a social-driven location sharing application
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Janne Lindqvist, Jason Hong, Jason Wiese, John Zimmerman, Justin Cranshaw
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2409-2418
There have been many location sharing systems developed over the past two decades, and only recently have they started to be adopted by consumers. In this paper, we present the results of three studies focusing on the foursquare check-in system. We conduct...
     
Considering privacy issues in the context of Google glass
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong
Issue Date:November 2013
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Exploring capturable everyday memory for autobiographical authentication
Found in: Proceedings of the 2013 ACM international joint conference on Pervasive and ubiquitous computing (UbiComp '13)
By Eiji Hayashi, Jason I. Hong, Sauvik Das
Issue Date:September 2013
pp. 211-220
We explore how well the intersection between our own everyday memories and those captured by our smartphones can be used for what we call autobiographical authentication-a challenge-response authentication system that queries users about day-to-day experie...
     
CASA: context-aware scalable authentication
Found in: Proceedings of the Ninth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS '13)
By Eiji Hayashi, Ian Oakley, Jason Hong, Sauvik Das, Shahriyar Amini
Issue Date:July 2013
pp. 1-10
We introduce context-aware scalable authentication (CASA) as a way of balancing security and usability for authentication. Our core idea is to choose an appropriate form of active authentication (e.g., typing a PIN) based on the combination of multiple pas...
     
Ph.D. students must break away from undergraduate mentality
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong
Issue Date:July 2013
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Computer security needs refocus, and be nice about it
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong, Judy Robertson
Issue Date:June 2013
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Passwords getting painful, computing still blissful
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Daniel Reed, Jason Hong
Issue Date:March 2013
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Detecting offensive tweets via topical feature discovery over a large scale twitter corpus
Found in: Proceedings of the 21st ACM international conference on Information and knowledge management (CIKM '12)
By Bin Fan, Carolyn Rose, Guang Xiang, Jason Hong, Ling Wang
Issue Date:October 2012
pp. 1980-1984
In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised approach for detecting profanity-related offensive content in Twitter. Our approach exploits linguistic regularities in profane language via statistical topic modeling on a huge Twitter corpus, and detects ...
     
OTO: online trust oracle for user-centric trust establishment
Found in: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM conference on Computer and communications security (CCS '12)
By Adrian Perrig, Debin Gao, Emmanuel Owusu, Jason Hong, Jun Han, Payas Gupta, Tiffany Hyun-Jin Kim
Issue Date:October 2012
pp. 391-403
Malware continues to thrive on the Internet. Besides automated mechanisms for detecting malware, we provide users with trust evidence information to enable them to make informed trust decisions. To scope the problem, we study the challenge of assisting use...
     
The preface of the 4th International Workshop on Location-Based Social Networks
Found in: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp '12)
By Jason Hong, Yu Zheng
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 894-896
We briefly introduce the 4th international workshop on location-based social networks (LBSN 2012), describing its objective, importance, and results.
     
Expectation and purpose: understanding users' mental models of mobile app privacy through crowdsourcing
Found in: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp '12)
By Janne Lindqvist, Jason I. Hong, Jialiu Lin, Joy Zhang, Norman Sadeh, Shahriyar Amini
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 501-510
Smartphone security research has produced many useful tools to analyze the privacy-related behaviors of mobile apps. However, these automated tools cannot assess people's perceptions of whether a given action is legitimate, or how that action makes them fe...
     
Protecting against data breaches; living with mistakes
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Greg Linden, Jason Hong
Issue Date:June 2012
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
The state of phishing attacks
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong
Issue Date:January 2012
pp. 74-81
Looking past the systems people use, they target the people using the systems.
     
Understanding how visual representations of location feeds affect end-user privacy concerns
Found in: Proceedings of the 13th international conference on Ubiquitous computing (UbiComp '11)
By Daniel P. Siewiorek, Jason I. Hong, Karen P. Tang
Issue Date:September 2011
pp. 207-216
While past work has looked extensively at how to design privacy configuration UIs for sharing current location, there has not yet been work done to examine how visual representations of historical locations can influence end-user privacy. We present result...
     
Caché: caching location-enhanced content to improve user privacy
Found in: Proceedings of the 9th international conference on Mobile systems, applications, and services (MobiSys '11)
By Eran Toch, Janne Lindqvist, Jason Hong, Jialiu Lin, Norman Sadeh, Shahriyar Amini
Issue Date:June 2011
pp. 197-210
We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of Caché, a system that offers location privacy for certain classes of location-based applications. The core idea in Caché is to periodically pre-fetch potentially useful location-enhanced con...
     
A diary study of password usage in daily life
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Eiji Hayashi, Jason Hong
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2627-2630
While past work has examined password usage on a specific computer, web site, or organization, there is little work examining overall password usage in daily life. Through a diary study, we examine all usage of passwords, and offer some new findings based ...
     
Security through a different kind of obscurity: evaluating distortion in graphical authentication schemes
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Eiji Hayashi, Jason Hong, Nicolas Christin
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2055-2064
While a large body of research on image-based authentication has focused on memorability, comparatively less attention has been paid to the new security challenges these schemes may introduce. Because images can convey more information than text, image-bas...
     
Apolo: making sense of large network data by combining rich user interaction and machine learning
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '11)
By Aniket Kittur, Christos Faloutsos, Duen Horng Chau, Jason I. Hong
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 167-176
Extracting useful knowledge from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains, from scientific literature to social networks and the web. We introduce Apolo, a system that uses a mixed-initiative approach - combining visualizat...
     
Matters of design, part II
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong
Issue Date:April 2011
pp. 10-11
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACMhttp://cac...
     
Undistracted driving: a mobile phone that doesn't distract
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications (HotMobile '11)
By Janne Lindqvist, Jason Hong
Issue Date:March 2011
pp. 70-75
Distracted driving is a major problem that leads to unnecessary accidents and human casualties everywhere in the world. The ubiquity of mobile phones is one cause of distracted driving. In United States alone, operating mobile phones while driving has been...
     
Matters of design
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong
Issue Date:February 2011
pp. 10-11
http://cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacmThe Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts.twitterFollow us on Twitter at ht...
     
Security advice; malvertisements; and CS education in Qatar
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Greg Linden, Jason Hong, Mark Guzdial
Issue Date:December 2010
pp. 10-11
The Communications website features more than a dozen bloggers in the The BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts. Follow us on Twitter. Greg Linden discusses security advice and the cost of user effor...
     
Locaccino: a privacy-centric location sharing application
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th ACM international conference adjunct papers on Ubiquitous computing - Adjunct (Ubicomp '10 Adjunct)
By Eran Toch, Jason Hong, Jay Springfield, Justin Cranshaw, Lorrie Cranor, Norman Sadeh, Patrick Gage Kelley, Paul Hankes-Drielsma
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 381-382
Locaccino is a location sharing application designed to empower users to effectively control their privacy. It has been piloted by close to 2000 users and has been used by researchers as an experimental platform for conducting research on location-based so...
     
Bridging the gap between physical location and online social networks
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th ACM international conference on Ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp '10)
By Aniket Kittur, Eran Toch, Jason Hong, Justin Cranshaw, Norman Sadeh
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 119-128
This paper examines the location traces of 489 users of a location sharing social network for relationships between the users' mobility patterns and structural properties of their underlying social network. We introduce a novel set of location-based featur...
     
Empirical models of privacy in location sharing
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th ACM international conference on Ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp '10)
By Eran Toch, James Springfield, Janice Y. Tsai, Jason Hong, Justin Cranshaw, Lorrie Cranor, Norman Sadeh, Patrick Gage Kelley, Paul Hankes Drielsma
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 129-138
The rapid adoption of location tracking and mobile social networking technologies raises significant privacy challenges. Today our understanding of people's location sharing privacy preferences remains very limited, including how these preferences are impa...
     
Rethinking location sharing: exploring the implications of social-driven vs. purpose-driven location sharing
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th ACM international conference on Ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp '10)
By Daniel P. Siewiorek, Jason I. Hong, Jialiu Lin, Karen P. Tang, Norman Sadeh
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 85-94
The popularity of micro-blogging has made general-purpose information sharing a pervasive phenomenon. This trend is now impacting location sharing applications (LSAs) such that users are sharing their location data with a much wider and more diverse audien...
     
Modeling people's place naming preferences in location sharing
Found in: Proceedings of the 12th ACM international conference on Ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp '10)
By Guang Xiang, Jason I. Hong, Jialiu Lin, Norman Sadeh
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 75-84
Most location sharing applications display people's locations on a map. However, people use a rich variety of terms to refer to their locations, such as "home," "Starbucks," or "the bus stop near my house." Our long-term goal is to create a system that can...
     
Generating default privacy policies for online social networks
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th of the international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '10)
By Eran Toch, Jason Hong, Norman M. Sadeh
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 4243-4248
Default privacy policies have a significant impact on the overall dynamics and success of online social networks, as users tend to keep their initial privacy policies. In this work-in-progress, we present a new method for suggesting privacy policies for ne...
     
Saying good-bye to DBMSs, designing effective interfaces
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Jason Hong, Michael Stonebraker, Michael Stonebraker
Issue Date:September 2009
pp. 12-13
The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features 13 bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish excerpts from selected posts, plus readers' comments.Michael Stonebraker discusses the problems with relationa...
     
Who's viewed you?: the impact of feedback in a mobile location-sharing application
Found in: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS '09)
By Janice Tsai, Jason Hong, Lorrie Cranor, Norman Sadeh, Patrick Kelley, Paul Hankes Drielsma
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 1-32
Existing technologies for file sharing differ widely in the granularity of control they give users over who can access their data; achieving finer-grained control generally requires more user effort. We want to understand what level of control users need o...
     
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