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Displaying 1-49 out of 49 total
Global Software Engineering: The Future of Socio-technical Coordination
Found in: Future of Software Engineering
By James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2007
pp. 188-198
Globally-distributed projects are rapidly becoming the norm for large software systems, even as it becomes clear that global distribution of a project seriously impairs critical coordination mechanisms. In this paper, I describe a desired future for global...
 
The geography of coordination: dealing with distance in R&D work
Found in: Proceedings of the international ACM SIGGROUP conference on Supporting group work (GROUP '99)
By Dewayne E. Perry, James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:November 1999
pp. 306-315
Geographically distributed development creates new questions about how to coordinate multi-site work. In this paper, we present four methods product development organizations used to coordinate their work: functional areas of expertise, product structure, ...
     
An Empirical Study of Global Software Development: Distance and Speed
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By James D. Herbsleb, Audris Mockus, Thomas A. Finholt, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:May 2001
pp. 0081
Abstract: Global software development is rapidly becoming the norm for technology companies. Previous qualitative research suggests that multi-site development may increase development cycle time. We use both survey data and data from the source code chang...
 
Coordination Breakdowns and Their Impact on Development Productivity and Software Failures
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
By Marcelo Cataldo,James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:March 2013
pp. 343-360
The success of software development projects depends on carefully coordinating the effort of many individuals across the multiple stages of the development process. In software engineering, modularization is the traditional technique intended to reduce the...
 
Guest Editors' Introduction: Global Software Development
Found in: IEEE Software
By James D. Herbsleb, Deependra Moitra
Issue Date:March 2001
pp. 16-20
No summary available.
 
Managing a corporate open source software asset
Found in: Communications of the ACM
By Anita Garvert, James D. Herbsleb, James D. Herbsleb, Vijay K. Gurbani, Vijay K. Gurbani
Issue Date:February 2010
pp. 155-159
Introduction We define corporate open source (COS) as applying the precepts and methodologies prevalent in the open source development community for creating industrial-strength software projects in a corporation for internal use. It may seem that open sou...
     
Practices and Supporting Structures for Mature Inquiry Culture in Distributed Software Development Projects
Found in: Global Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Vesna Mikulovic, Michael Heiss, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:October 2006
pp. 245-246
As software specifications for complex systems are practically never entirely complete and consistent, the recipient of the specification needs domain knowledge in order to decide which parts of the system are specified clearly and which parts are specifie...
 
Software Dependencies, Work Dependencies, and Their Impact on Failures
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
By Marcelo Cataldo, Audris Mockus, Jeffrey A. Roberts, James D. Herbsleb
Publication Date: July 2009
pp. 864-878
Prior research has shown that customer-reported software faults are often the result of violated dependencies that are not recognized by developers implementing software. Many types of dependencies and corresponding measures have been proposed to help addr...
 
A Coordination Risk Analysis Method for Multi-site Projects: Experience Report
Found in: Global Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Matthew Bass, James D. Herbsleb, Christian Lescher
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 31-40
It has been widely recognized that coordination amongst the people involved in developing a software intensive system is required for successful completion. Many projects, particularly those with team members separated by geographic distance, have an imped...
 
End-to-end features as meta-entities for enabling coordination in geographically distributed software development
Found in: Software Development Governance, ICSE Workshop on
By Marcelo Cataldo, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2009
pp. 21-26
The nature of the software development work activities and their inter-relationships makes supporting geographically distributed software development projects a challenging endeavor. In this paper, we discussed the limitations of the traditional organizati...
 
Improving API documentation usability with knowledge pushing
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Uri Dekel, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2009
pp. 320-330
The documentation of API functions typically conveys detailed specifications for the benefit of interested readers. In some cases, however, it also contains usage directives, such as rules or caveats, of which authors of invoking code must be made aware to...
 
On Coordination Mechanisms in Global Software Development
Found in: Global Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Marcelo Cataldo, Matthew Bass, James D. Herbsleb, Len Bass
Issue Date:August 2007
pp. 71-80
The ability of an organization to successfully carry out its tasks depends on the appropriate combination of organizational structure, processes, and communication and coordination mechanisms. In this paper, we present four case studies that exemplify coor...
 
Collaboration in Global Software Projects at Siemens: An Experience Report
Found in: Global Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Matthew Bass, James D. Herbsleb, Christian Lescher
Issue Date:August 2007
pp. 33-39
As a globally operating company with about 30,000 software engineers worldwide, Siemens has accumulated a wide variety of experiences in global development. Many individuals and organizations have adjusted their practices to deal with the challenges relate...
 
A case study of a corporate open source development model
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By James D. Herbsleb, Anita Garvert, Vijay K. Gurbani
Issue Date:May 2006
pp. 472-481
Open source practices and tools have proven to be highly effective for overcoming the many problems of geographically distributed software development. We know relatively little, however, about the range of settings in which they work. In particular, can c...
 
An Empirical Study of Speed and Communication in Globally Distributed Software Development
Found in: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
By James D. Herbsleb, Audris Mockus
Issue Date:June 2003
pp. 481-494
<p><b>Abstract</b>—Global software development is rapidly becoming the norm for technology companies. Previous qualitative research suggests that distributed development may increase development cycle time for individual work items (modif...
 
Making the Software Factory Work: Lessons from a Decade of Experience
Found in: Software Metrics, IEEE International Symposium on
By Harvey P. Siy, James D. Herbsleb, Audris Mockus, George T. Tucker, Mayuram Krishnan
Issue Date:April 2001
pp. 317
At the heart of proposals to use process-oriented techniques for creating organizations that are capable of creating high-quality software at low cost is a focus on software process maturity, organizational learning to foster continuous improvement, and co...
 
Architectures, Coordination, and Distance: Conway's Law and Beyond
Found in: IEEE Software
By James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:September 1999
pp. 63-70
<p>Geographically distributed development teams face extraordinary communication and coordination problems. The authors' case study clearly demonstrates how common but unanticipated events can stretch project communication to the breaking point. Proj...
 
Conceptual Simplicity Meets Organizational Complexity: Case Study of a Corporate Metrics Program
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:April 1998
pp. 271
No summary available.
 
Expertise Browser: A Quantitative Approach to Identifying Expertise
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By Audris Mockus, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2002
pp. 503
Finding relevant expertise is a critical need in collaborative software engineering, particularly in geographically distributed developments. We introduce a tool that uses data from change management systems to locate people with desired expertise. It uses...
 
Splitting the organization and integrating the code: Conway's law revisited
Found in: Software Engineering, International Conference on
By James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:May 1999
pp. 85
It is widely acknowledged that coordination of large scale software development is an extremely difficult and persistent problem. Since the structure of the code mirrors the structure of the organization, one might expect that splitting the organization ac...
 
Sharing, re-use and circulation of resources in cooperative scientific work
Found in: Proceedings of the companion publication of the 17th ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work & social computing (CSCW Companion '14)
By David Ribes, E. Ilana Diamant, James D. Herbsleb, James Howison, Matthew J. Bietz, Stephanie B. Steinhardt, Theresa Velden
Issue Date:February 2014
pp. 347-350
This one-day workshop aims to stimulate research on the sharing and reuse of scientific resources in cooperative scientific work. As science trends toward increasing geographic and temporal scales, larger collaborations, and greater interdisciplinarity, sc...
     
Incentives and integration in scientific software production
Found in: Proceedings of the 2013 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '13)
By James D. Herbsleb, James Howison
Issue Date:February 2013
pp. 459-470
Science policy makers are looking for approaches to increase the extent of collaboration in the production of scientific software, looking to open collaborations in open source software for inspiration. We examine the software ecosystem surrounding BLAST, ...
     
Scientific software production: incentives and collaboration
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2011 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '11)
By James D. Herbsleb, James Howison
Issue Date:March 2011
pp. 513-522
Software plays an increasingly critical role in science, including data analysis, simulations, and managing workflows. Unlike other technologies supporting science, software can be copied and distributed at essentially no cost, potentially opening the door...
     
Program comprehension as fact finding
Found in: Proceedings of the the 6th joint meeting of the European software engineering conference and the ACM SIGSOFT symposium on The foundations of software engineering (ESEC-FSE '07)
By Brad A. Myers, David Garlan, James D. Herbsleb, Thomas D. LaToza
Issue Date:September 2007
pp. 361-370
Little is known about how developers think about design during code modification tasks or how experienced developers' design knowledge helps them work more effectively. We performed a lab study in which thirteen developers worked for 3 hours under-standing...
     
Work-to-rule: the emergence of algorithmic governance in Wikipedia
Found in: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Communities and Technologies (C&T '13)
By Claudia Müller-Birn, James D. Herbsleb, Leonhard Dobusch
Issue Date:June 2013
pp. 80-89
Research has shown the importance of a functioning governance system for the success of peer production communities. It particularly highlights the role of human coordination and communication within the governance regime. In this article, we extend this l...
     
The future of collaborative software development
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2012 conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work Companion (CSCW '12)
By Andrew Begel, James D. Herbsleb, Margaret-Anne Storey
Issue Date:February 2012
pp. 17-18
Software development organizations are changing from traditional enterprise or open source teams to decentralized, inter-reliant, multi-scale ecosystems of software developers. This transformation presents novel challenges and opportunities to those seekin...
     
Configuring global software teams: a multi-company analysis of project productivity, quality, and profits
Found in: Proceeding of the 33rd international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '11)
By James D. Herbsleb, Marcelo Cataldo, Narayan Ramasubbu, Rajesh Krishna Balan
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 261-270
In this paper, we examined the impact of project-level configurational choices of globally distributed software teams on project productivity, quality, and profits. Our analysis used data from 362 projects of four different firms. These projects spanned a ...
     
Factors leading to integration failures in global feature-oriented development: an empirical analysis
Found in: Proceeding of the 33rd international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '11)
By James D. Herbsleb, Marcelo Cataldo
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 161-170
Feature-driven software development is a novel approach that has grown in popularity over the past decade. Researchers and practitioners alike have argued that numerous benefits could be garnered from adopting a feature-driven development approach. However...
     
Coordination in innovative design and engineering: observations from a lunar robotics project
Found in: Proceedings of the 16th ACM international conference on Supporting group work (GROUP '10)
By Anita Sarma, James D. Herbsleb, Laura A. Dabbish, Patrick Wagstrom
Issue Date:November 2010
pp. 225-234
Coordinating activities across groups in systems engineering or product development projects is critical to project success, but substantially more difficult when the work is innovative and dynamic. It is not clear how technology should best support cross-...
     
Architecting in software ecosystems: interface translucence as an enabler for scalable collaboration
Found in: Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Software Architecture: Companion Volume (ECSA '10)
By James D. Herbsleb, Marcelo Cataldo
Issue Date:August 2010
pp. 65-72
Software ecosystems are emerging as an alternative approach for the development of complex software systems. The potentially transformational benefits of software ecosystems stems, primarily, from two basic principles that software ecosystems have embraced...
     
Communication networks in geographically distributed software development
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2008 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '08)
By James D. Herbsleb, Marcelo Cataldo
Issue Date:November 2008
pp. 21-27
In this paper, we seek to shed light on how communication networks in geographically distributed projects evolve in order to address the limits of the modular design strategy. We collected data from a geographically distributed software development project...
     
Pushing relevant artifact annotations in collaborative software development
Found in: Proceedings of the ACM 2008 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '08)
By James D. Herbsleb, Uri Dekel
Issue Date:November 2008
pp. 21-27
Recent techniques show the benefits of attaching community generated knowledge to artifacts in an information space and presenting it to subsequent readers. We argue that such knowledge may also be relevant to the readers of artifacts which link to this ta...
     
Socio-technical congruence: a framework for assessing the impact of technical and work dependencies on software development productivity
Found in: Proceedings of the Second ACM-IEEE international symposium on Empirical software engineering and measurement (ESEM '08)
By James D. Herbsleb, Kathleen M. Carley, Marcelo Cataldo
Issue Date:October 2008
pp. 1-87
The identification and management of work dependencies is a fundamental challenge in software development organizations. This paper argues that modularization, the traditional technique intended to reduce interdependencies among components of a system, has...
     
Communication patterns in geographically distributed software development and engineers' contributions to the development effort
Found in: Proceedings of the 2008 international workshop on Cooperative and human aspects of software engineering (CHASE '08)
By James D. Herbsleb, Marcelo Cataldo
Issue Date:May 2008
pp. 25-28
This study seeks to shed light on how communication patterns in geographically distributed software development (GDSD) projects evolve over time and how they relate to developers' contributions to the development effort. Data from two GDSD projects from tw...
     
Notation and representation in collaborative object-oriented design: an observational study
Found in: Proceedings of the 22nd annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object oriented programming systems and applications (OOPSLA '07)
By James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:October 2007
pp. 132-135
Software designers in the object-oriented paradigm can make use of modeling tools and standard notations such as UML. Nevertheless, casual observations from collocated design collaborations suggest that teams tend to use physical mediums to sketch a pletho...
     
Identification of coordination requirements: implications for the Design of collaboration and awareness tools
Found in: Proceedings of the 2006 20th anniversary conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '06)
By James D. Herbsleb, Kathleen M. Carley, Marcelo Cataldo, Patrick A. Wagstrom
Issue Date:November 2006
pp. 353-362
Task dependencies drive the need to coordinate work activities. We describe a technique for using automatically generated archi-val data to compute coordination requirements, i.e., who must coordinate with whom to get the work done. Analysis of data from a...
     
A case study of a corporate open source development model
Found in: Proceeding of the 28th international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '06)
By Anita Garvert, James D. Herbsleb, Vijay K. Gurbani
Issue Date:May 2006
pp. 472-481
Open source practices and tools have proven to be highly effective for overcoming the many problems of geographically distributed software development. We know relatively little, however, about the range of settings in which they work. In particular, can c...
     
A case study of open source tools and practices in a commercial setting
Found in: Proceedings of the 2005 workshop on Open source software engineering (WOSSE '05)
By Anita Garvert, James D. Herbsleb, Vijay K. Gurbani
Issue Date:May 2005
pp. 105-110
Commercially, many in the industry are using products based on Open Source. What have been missing are studies on if the commercial industry benefits from developing software following the open source development model. We present a case study that examine...
     
Global software development at siemens: experience from nine projects
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '05)
By Daniel J. Paulish, James D. Herbsleb, Matthew Bass
Issue Date:May 2005
pp. 524-533
We report on the experiences of Siemens Corporation in nine globally-distributed software development projects. These projects represent a range of collaboration models, from co-development to outsourcing of components to outsourcing the software for an en...
     
Beyond computer science
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '05)
By James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2005
pp. 23-27
Computer science is necessary but not sufficient to understand and overcome the problems we face in software engineering. We need to understand not only the properties of the software itself, but also the limitations and competences humans bring to the eng...
     
What is chat doing in the workplace?
Found in: Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '02)
By James D. Herbsleb, Mark Handel
Issue Date:November 2002
pp. 1-10
We report an empirical study of a synchronous messaging application with group-oriented functionality designed to support teams in the workplace. In particular, the tool supports group chat windows that allow members of a group to communicate with text tha...
     
Expertise browser: a quantitative approach to identifying expertise
Found in: Proceedings of the 24th international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '02)
By Audris Mockus, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:May 2002
pp. 503-512
Finding relevant expertise is a critical need in collaborative software engineering, particularly in geographically distributed developments. We introduce a tool that uses data from change management systems to locate people with desired expertise. It uses...
     
Introducing instant messaging and chat in the workplace
Found in: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems: Changing our world, changing ourselves (CHI '02)
By David G. Boyer, David L. Atkins, James D. Herbsleb, Mark Handel, Thomas A. Finholt
Issue Date:April 2002
pp. 171-178
We report on our experiences of introducing an instant messaging and group chat application into geographically distributed workgroups. We describe a number of issues we encountered, including privacy concerns, individual versus group training, and focusin...
     
Distance, dependencies, and delay in a global collaboration
Found in: Proceedings of the 2000 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '00)
By Audris Mockus, James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter, Thomas A. Finholt
Issue Date:December 2000
pp. 319-328
Collaborations over distance must contend with the loss of the rich, subtle interactions that co-located teams use to coordinate their work. Previous research has suggested that one consequence of this loss is that cross-site work will take longer than com...
     
Ensuring privacy in presence awareness: an automated verification approach
Found in: Proceedings of the 2000 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW '00)
By Du Li, James D. Herbsleb, Lalita Jategaonkar Jagadeesany, Patrice Godefroid
Issue Date:December 2000
pp. 59-68
Providing information about other users and their activites is a central function of many collaborative applications. The data that provide this "presence awareness" are usually automatically generated and highly dynamic. For example, services such as AOL ...
     
Splitting the organization and integrating the code: Conway's law revisited
Found in: Proceedings of the 21st international conference on Software engineering (ICSE '99)
By James D. Herbsleb, Rebecca E. Grinter
Issue Date:May 1999
pp. 85-95
In this article we present a research scheme which aims to analyze the use of Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) technology to improve the robustness and acceptability of speaker enrolment and verification dialogues designed to provide secure access throu...
     
Metaphorical representation in collaborative software engineering
Found in: Proceedings of the international joint conference on Work activities coordination and collaboration (WACC '99)
By James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:February 1999
pp. 201-207
Finding a useful abstract representation is fundamental to solving many difficult problems in software engineering. In order to better understand how representations are actually used in key collaborative software engineering tasks, this empirical study ex...
     
Preserving knowledge in design projects: what designers need to know
Found in: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '93)
By Eiji Kuwana, James D. Herbsleb
Issue Date:April 1993
pp. 7-14
Common wisdom states rapid prototyping will result in a better product. Many tools are available to assist the practitioner in producing prototypes. Yet, few indications exist to show rapid prototyping has substantially improved how products are built.This...
     
Two case studies of open source software development: Apache and Mozilla
Found in: ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology (TOSEM)
By Audris Mockus, James D Herbsleb, Roy T Fielding
Issue Date:January 1992
pp. 309-346
According to its proponents, open source style software development has the capacity to compete successfully, and perhaps in many cases displace, traditional commercial development methods. In order to begin investigating such claims, we examine data from ...
     
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