Search For:

Displaying 1-18 out of 18 total
Face Recognition in the Thermal Infrared Spectrum
Found in: Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshop
By Pradeep Buddharaju, Ioannis Pavlidis, Ioannis Kakadiaris
Issue Date:July 2004
pp. 133
We present a two-stage face recognition method based on infrared imaging and statistical modeling. In the first stage we reduce the search space by finding highly likely candidates before arriving at a singular conclusion during the second stage. Previous ...
 
NEAT-o-Games: blending physical activity and fun in the daily routine
Found in: Computers in Entertainment (CIE)
By Colin Puri, Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Konstantinos Kazakos, Pradeep Buddharaju, Yuichi Fujiki, Colin Puri, Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Konstantinos Kazakos, Pradeep Buddharaju, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:July 2008
pp. 1-8
This article describes research that aims to encourage physical activity through a novel pervasive gaming paradigm. Data from a wearable accelerometer are logged wirelessly to a cell phone and control the animation of an avatar that represents the player i...
     
Automatic Initiation of the Periorbital Signal Extraction in Thermal Imagery
Found in: Advanced Video and Signal Based Surveillance, IEEE Conference on
By Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:September 2009
pp. 182-187
User intervention in the periorbital thermal signal extraction process breaks down automation. This paper proposes a novel way to minimize user intervention. While previous work demonstrated the importance of accurate computation of the periorbital signal,...
 
The Segmentation of the Supraorbital Vessels in Thermal Imagery
Found in: Advanced Video and Signal Based Surveillance, IEEE Conference on
By Zhen Zhu, Panagiotis Tsiamyrtzis, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:September 2008
pp. 237-244
Thermal imaging techniques have been applied to detect and measure mental stress in polygraph screening and other applications. Mental stress is highly correlated with the activation of the corrugator muscle on the forehead. The vessels that supply
 
Tracking Human Breath in Infrared Imaging
Found in: Bioinformatic and Bioengineering, IEEE International Symposium on
By Zhen Zhu, Jin Fei, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:October 2005
pp. 227-231
In this paper, we propose a novel tracker to capture the human breathing signal through an infrared imaging method. Human facial physiology information is used to select salient thermal features on the human face as good features to track. The major compon...
 
Imaging the Cardiovascular Pulse
Found in: Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, IEEE Computer Society Conference on
By Nanfei Sun, Marc Garbey, Arcangelo Merla, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:June 2005
pp. 416-421
We have developed a novel method to measure human cardiac pulse at a distance. It is based on the information contained in the thermal signal emitted from major superficial vessels. This signal is acquired through a highly sensitive thermal imaging system....
 
Thermal Imaging for Anxiety Detection
Found in: Computer Vision Beyond the Visible Spectrum, IEEE Workshop on
By Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Paulette Baukol
Issue Date:June 2000
pp. 104
We propose a revolutionary concept for detecting suspects engaged in illegal and potentially harmful activities in or around critical military or civilian installations. We investigate the use of thermal image analysis to detect at distance facial patterns...
 
The Imaging Issue in an Automatic Face/Disguise Detection System
Found in: Computer Vision Beyond the Visible Spectrum, IEEE Workshop on
By Ioannis Pavlidis, Peter Symosek
Issue Date:June 2000
pp. 15
Automatic face recognition systems have made great strides in the past 10 years. They still, however, cannot cope with changes due to lighting and cannot detect disguises. Both of these issues are critical for the employment of face recognition systems in ...
 
An On-Line Handwritten Note Recognition Method Using Shape Metamorphosis
Found in: Document Analysis and Recognition, International Conference on
By Ioannis Pavlidis, Rahul Singh, Nikolaos P. Papanikolopoulos
Issue Date:August 1997
pp. 914
We propose a novel user-dependent method for the recognition of on-line handwritten notes. The method employs as a dissimilarity measure the ``degree of morphing'' between an input curve and a template curve. A physics-based approach substantiates the ``de...
 
Who said monitoring is boring
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '11)
By Anitha Mandapathi, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Pradeep Buddharaju, Swati Vaidya
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2041-2046
In this article, we extend our previous work [1], which blended gaming in monotonous security tasks to increase operator engagement and enjoyment. Specifically, we expand from a single game presented in [1] to an assortment of games that appeal to differen...
     
A novel way to conduct human studies and do some good
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th of the international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '10)
By Ergun Akleman, Ioannis Pavlidis, Pradeep Buddharaju, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 4699-4702
In this paper the authors describe a novel way to conduct large-scale human studies achieving the maximum outreach and impact with the minimum cost. An iPhone health application, 'Walk n' Play', was developed and released for free in the App Store. The app...
     
A novel method to monitor driver's distractions
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th of the international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '10)
By Avinash Wesley, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 4273-4278
Many attempts were made in the past to monitor a driver's visual and cognitive distractions. Yet, most of the techniques did not become a practical application due to their contact-based nature of monitoring. In this paper, we describe research that aims t...
     
O job can you return my mojo: improving human engagement and enjoyment in routine activities
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th international conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '10)
By Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Panagiotis Tsiamyrtzis, Ross Buffington, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 2491-2498
Unlike machines, we humans are prone to boredom when we perform routine activities for long periods of time. Workers' mental engagement in boring tasks diminishes, which eventually, compromises their performance. The result is a double-whammy because the w...
     
Making sense of accelerometer measurements in pervasive physical activity applications
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '09)
By Ioannis Pavlidis, Panagiotis Tsiamyrtzis, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:April 2009
pp. 1-4
In the last few years, accelerometer-based entertainment and health applications have been receiving increased attention in the research and commercial worlds. The effect of accelerometer placement on different parts of the body, despite its apparent signi...
     
O' game, can you feel my frustration?: improving user's gaming experience via stresscam
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '09)
By Chang Yun, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Zhigang Deng
Issue Date:April 2009
pp. 1-4
One of the major challenges of video game design is to have appropriate difficulty levels for users in order to maximize the entertainment value of the game. Game players may lose interests if a game is either too easy or too difficult. This paper presents...
     
NEAT-o-Games: novel mobile gaming versus modern sedentary lifestyle
Found in: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on Human computer interaction with mobile devices and services (MobileHCI '08)
By Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Konstantinos Kazakos, Thirimachos Bourlai, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:September 2008
pp. 1-30
The proposed demonstration is based on the work performed as part of the NEAT-o-Games project. NEAT-o-Games is a suite of games that runs on mobile terminals such as cell phones. Unlike other games, NEAT-o-Games' primary goal is to become part of people's ...
     
NEAT-o-games: ubiquitous activity-based gaming
Found in: CHI '07 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '07)
By Colin Puri, Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Justin Starren, Konstantinos Kazakos, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:April 2007
pp. 2369-2374
The role of Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenes is (NEAT) has become a key component of obesity research, prevention, and treatment. This paper describes research that aims to suppress the obesity epidemic by infusing NEAT in the sedentary lifestyle of an av...
     
StressCam: non-contact measurement of users' emotional states through thermal imaging
Found in: CHI '05 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '05)
By Colin Puri, Ioannis Pavlidis, James Levine, Justin Starren, Leslie Olson
Issue Date:April 2005
pp. 1725-1728
We present a novel methodology for monitoring the affective states of computer users. The method is based on thermal imaging of the face. To the user, the imaging system appears much like a video-conferencing camera. The method does not require contact wit...
     
 1