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Displaying 1-50 out of 77 total
Quantitative Observation and Theoretical Construction in Software Architecture
Found in: Software Architecture, Working IEEE/IFIP Conference on
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2005
pp. 3
Classical science advances via the dance between quantitative observation and theoretical construction. It has been ten years since the first International Software Architecture Workshop, and since that time there has been a steady increase in the number o...
 
To Code or Not to Code, That Is the Question
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2014
pp. 9-11
There have been many periods in the unfolding of human history when we have asserted that it was possible to catalog all that was known or that could be known. Ignoring the pragmatic reality of trying to catalog an ever-expanding corpus, one must understan...
   
The Stories We Tell Ourselves
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2014
pp. 18-20
Storytelling involves weaving abstractions about fundamental truths regarding the world and the human experience to entertain and educate. When it comes to movies and television, producers and directors often make computer technology look like magic. It do...
   
The Human and Ethical Aspects of Big Data
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2014
pp. 20-22
Every line of code represents a moral decision; every bit of data collected, analyzed, and visualized has moral implications. The Web extra at http://youtu.be/iY7mU1mtQ08 is an audio podcast of author Grady Booch reading his On Computing column, in which h...
   
Deus ex Machina
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2013
pp. 14-16
No matter your individual position on the matter, faith is a powerful element of the human experience. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that computing intersects with the story of belief in many ways. Here, we explore computing as a medium for faith, as ...
 
The Wonder Years
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2013
pp. 16-17
For those on the outside of the curtain of computing, there is much mystery behind the matter of software-intensive systems. To some, it looks like magic; to most, its inner workings are irrelevant insofar that it simply works. To those of us behind the cu...
 
In Defense of Boring
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2013
pp. 16-17
On the one hand, we seek to build software-intensive systems that are innovative, elegant, and supremely useful. On the other hand, computing technology as a thing unto itself is not the place of enduring value, and therefore, as computing fills the spaces...
 
From Minecraft to Minds
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2013
pp. 11-13
The subject of the computability of the mind introduces complex philosophical, ethical, and technical issues. That aside, this topic draws us in to the nature of algorithms. We are surrounded by algorithms; much of the history of computing is also the hist...
 
The Great and Terrible Oz
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2013
pp. 14-15
Computing is transforming every aspect of the human experience. As creators of this technology, what obligations do we have to the general public, for whom we make the complex machinery of computing increasingly invisible? The Web extra at http://youtu.be/...
 
Woven on the Loom of Sorrow
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2012
pp. 13-15
Computing was once a companion to conflict; computing is now an instrument of war; computing is becoming a theater of war. Along the way, conflict has shaped computing, and computing has changed the nature of warfare.
 
Three Stories
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2012
pp. 16-18
We live in an enchanted land of our own making. While much of the world benefits from the technology that has made that enchantment possible, much of the world neither knows nor cares about the inner life of computing.
 
The Human Experience
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2012
pp. 13-15
Computing has transformed humanity in ways that we have only begun to metabolize. Computing amplifies what we celebrate most about being human, but it also has the capacity to magnify that which we mourn. Exploring the story of computing has value, for an ...
 
All Things Unseen
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2012
pp. 14-16
There exists considerable literature on the public face of civil architecture: what it is, how we may judge it, how we are changed by it. We have lived in buildings and cities for millennia, so the nature of visible architecture is part of the fabric of ou...
 
Facing Future
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2012
pp. 20-21
There comes a point of no return in the life of every successful software-intensive system, a point where you can no longer place a pile of your best developers at one end of a lever and expect them to move the world. Rather, you must come to realize that ...
 
The Professional Architect
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2012
pp. 12-13
All complex systems grow from smaller systems that work in the first place; all complex systems will fail, in one way or another. Between the small and the large, between the perfect and the flawed, there is some person or persons who had a vision for the ...
 
The Architecture of Small Things
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2011
pp. 18-19
There is complexity, and then there is organized complexity. Pure complexity is chaotic; organized complexity is full of patterns. Naming these patterns and respecting their intention is the essence of architecture.
 
Unintentional and Unbalanced Transparency
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2011
pp. 12-13
Security and privacy are interdependent concepts. Each impacts the other, but to say that they are alternatives is a false dichotomy. Both are issues of human concern; their policies and their risks may be made manifest in software-intensive systems. Archi...
 
The Soul of a New Watson
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2011
pp. 9-10
Making manifest, syndicating, and then governing a system's architecture facilitates understanding, reasoning about, and transforming that system with intention. This premise holds true for new systems as well as legacy ones, exploratory systems as well as...
 
The Architect's Journey
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 10-11
Architecting a software-intensive system encompasses technical elements, social considerations, and a technical core. Most interesting systems start small and focus on technical concerns, but once they grow to the point of economic significance, social iss...
 
Dominant Design
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2011
pp. 8-9
The architecture of any innovative software-intensive system will experience many periods of growth and then collapse, with times of punctuated equilibrium in between. This appears to be a natural and desirable phenomenon. Fighting that reality wastes ener...
 
Draw Me a Picture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2011
pp. 6-7
Developers, for the most part, don't draw diagrams because diagrams all too often don't offer any fundamental value that advances essential work. Yet, the problem remains that we must visualize ultra-large complex systems that have no directly observable p...
 
Back to the Future
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2008
pp. 20-21
Over the past 25 years, we've made great advances in tooling, technologies, and techniques that make software design more concrete. But design still requires careful thought.
 
The Elephant and the Blind Programmers
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2010
pp. 88, 87
The architecture of a software-intensive system is best reasoned about through multiple, nearly independent views. Here we examine Kruchten's 4+1 model view in a new light.
 
An Architectural Oxymoron
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2010
pp. 96, 95
To some, the phrase
 
Systems Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2010
pp. 96, 95
All complex systems fail, by some measure of the word
 
Architecture Reviews
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2010
pp. 96, 95
An architectural review serves several purposes: to gain confidence in the design, to reason about alternatives, to attend to architectural rot. The process of such a review involves the interplay of design decisions, scenarios, and forces on the system.
 
Enterprise Architecture and Technical Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2010
pp. 96, 95
Enterprise architecture and technical architecture are related yet different: whereas EA focuses on the architecture of a business that uses software-intensive systems, TA focuses on the architecture of the software-intensive systems that are used by a bus...
 
Architecture as a Shared Hallucination
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2010
pp. 96, 95
Architecture is just a collective hunch, a shared hallucination, an assertion by a set of stakeholders on the nature of their observable world, be it a world that is or a world as they wish it to be. This article examines the technical and social factors t...
 
Software Abundance in the Face of Economic Scarcity, Part 1
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2009
pp. 12-13
Software-intensive systems are an inescapable and necessary element in helping us operate, innovate, and even thrive in the face of lean economic times.
 
Like a River
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2009
pp. 10-11
The metaphor of software development as building construction is an old one. Here is a fresh perspective, considering the life cycle of a software-intensive system as a river.
 
Not with a Bang
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2009
pp. 74-75
Software-intensive systems, like bridges and societies, are subject to collapse. Collapse isn't necessarily inevitable, however, but avoiding it requires active, vigorous, and intentional intervention by the system's architects. Two patterns and one antipa...
 
Measuring Architectural Complexity
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2008
pp. 14-15
Without refactoring, complex software-intensive systems become increasingly irregular and thus increasingly chaotic over time. We can understand complex software systems only when they're nearly decomposable and hierarchic. One measure the author uses is l...
 
Architectural Organizational Patterns
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2008
pp. 18-19
What is the optimal design for a given system, a design that reasonably balances all the forces that weigh in on the problem? In turn, what is the optimal organizational structure for developing, deploying, and evolving that system? The challenge for every...
 
Tribal Memory
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2008
pp. 16-17
As the code written today becomes part of tomorrow's inexorably growing legacy, preserving these stories becomes increasingly important. It's costly to rely upon informal storytelling to preserve and communicate important decisions; it's incredibly costly ...
 
Morality and the Software Architect
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2008
pp. 8-9
Should software architects have a professional code of ethics? There is a moral dimension to developing software, another force to consider when engineering a reasonably optimal software-intensive solution.
 
Artifacts and Process
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2007
pp. 26-27
A comparison of building architecture and software architecture reveals the differences, congruences, and commonalities between the two. There are differences in cost estimation, but there are similarities in divisions of labor or knowledge, degrees of for...
 
The Economics of Architecture-First
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2007
pp. 18-20
The architect, either as an individual, a role, or a team, lovingly crafts, grows, and governs that architecture as it emerges from the thousands of individual design decisions of which it's composed. In this sense, an architecture-first approach appears t...
 
The Well-Tempered Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2007
pp. 24-25
Virtually all well-structured music, music that pleases the ear and moves the spirit, is full of patterns. By comparing musical and software patterns, the author helps clarify the purposes and forms of patterns. Architectural and design patterns make softw...
 
The Irrelevance of Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2007
pp. 10-11
The architecture of a software-intensive system is largely irrelevant to its end users. Far more important to these stakeholders is the system's behavior, exhibited by raw, working source code. As long as a system provides the right answers at the right ti...
 
Speaking Truth to Power
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2007
pp. 12-13
During an architectural assessment, Booch says, it's important to be truthful as well as gentle. He describes a few pitfalls, promises, complexities, and contradictions he's come across. He also notes the development organization's unique taskā€”to address a...
 
It Is What It Is Because It Was What It Was
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:January 2007
pp. 14-15
Software systems usually have the same basic architectural pattern as their earlier incarnations, manifesting in decreasingly refined forms as we move back in time. Similarly, when a new problem confronts us, we try many different approaches, but over time...
 
Goodness of Fit
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2006
pp. 14-15
On behalf of the Computer History Museum and the ACM, Grady Booch recently interviewed John Backus, who led the IBM team that created Fortran in the 1950s. Backus went on to coinvent the Backus-Naur Form (which was first applied to the definition of ALGOL)...
 
From Small to Gargantuan
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2006
pp. 14-15
Software development is ultimately an engineering activity, whose primary activity is to deliver executable artifacts in a manner that balances the forces on that system. The forces that swirl around a software-intensive system include not only its purely ...
 
The Accidental Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:May 2006
pp. 9-11
<p>Every interesting software-intensive system has an architecture. While some of these architectures are intentional, most appear to be accidental. Philippe Kruchten has observed that
 
On Architecture
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2006
pp. 16-18
For the past two years, the author has been working to create a handbook of software architecture (www.booch.com/architecture) and will continue to work on it for another two to three years. The handbook?s primary goal is to codify the architecture of 100 ...
 
The Unified Process
Found in: IEEE Software
By Ivar Jacobson, Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh
Issue Date:May 1999
pp. 96-102
No summary available.
 
Software Abundance in the Face of Economic Scarcity, Part 2
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:November 2009
pp. 15-16
Software-intensive systems are an inescapable and necessary element in helping us operate, innovate, and even thrive in the face of lean economic times.
 
The Defenestration of Superfluous Architectural Accoutrements
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:July 2009
pp. 7-8
Simple architectures have conceptual integrity and are better than more complex ones. Continuous architectural refactoring helps to converge a system to its practical and optimal simplicity.
 
The Resting Place of Innovation
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:March 2009
pp. 12-13
Successful software-intensive systems are generally quite innovative, as evidenced by their success. Although their architectures will, over time, converge to a stable point, this does not mean that innovation stops. Rather, for any such system to remain v...
 
Nine Things You Can Do with Old Software
Found in: IEEE Software
By Grady Booch
Issue Date:September 2008
pp. 93-94
Every new line of code quickly becomes legacy. When that legacy mounts, it forms a significantly massive pile of software, which cannot be ignored. This article discusses what we can do intentionally with such piles, from abandonment to evolution and many ...
 
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