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Displaying 1-5 out of 5 total
Automatic Initiation of the Periorbital Signal Extraction in Thermal Imagery
Found in: Advanced Video and Signal Based Surveillance, IEEE Conference on
By Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:September 2009
pp. 182-187
User intervention in the periorbital thermal signal extraction process breaks down automation. This paper proposes a novel way to minimize user intervention. While previous work demonstrated the importance of accurate computation of the periorbital signal,...
 
Who said monitoring is boring
Found in: Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '11)
By Anitha Mandapathi, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Pradeep Buddharaju, Swati Vaidya
Issue Date:May 2011
pp. 2041-2046
In this article, we extend our previous work [1], which blended gaming in monotonous security tasks to increase operator engagement and enjoyment. Specifically, we expand from a single game presented in [1] to an assortment of games that appeal to differen...
     
A novel method to monitor driver's distractions
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th of the international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '10)
By Avinash Wesley, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 4273-4278
Many attempts were made in the past to monitor a driver's visual and cognitive distractions. Yet, most of the techniques did not become a practical application due to their contact-based nature of monitoring. In this paper, we describe research that aims t...
     
O job can you return my mojo: improving human engagement and enjoyment in routine activities
Found in: Proceedings of the 28th international conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '10)
By Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Panagiotis Tsiamyrtzis, Ross Buffington, Yuichi Fujiki
Issue Date:April 2010
pp. 2491-2498
Unlike machines, we humans are prone to boredom when we perform routine activities for long periods of time. Workers' mental engagement in boring tasks diminishes, which eventually, compromises their performance. The result is a double-whammy because the w...
     
O' game, can you feel my frustration?: improving user's gaming experience via stresscam
Found in: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '09)
By Chang Yun, Dvijesh Shastri, Ioannis Pavlidis, Zhigang Deng
Issue Date:April 2009
pp. 1-4
One of the major challenges of video game design is to have appropriate difficulty levels for users in order to maximize the entertainment value of the game. Game players may lose interests if a game is either too easy or too difficult. This paper presents...
     
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