Entries with tag selective laser melting.

Computer Simulations Aid in Additive Manufacturing

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed a new approach for additive manufacturing that promises to be more efficient for making metal parts. Their selective laser melting process makes a 3D object in layers using a high-energy laser beam to fuse metal powder particles. Parts made using conventional selective laser melting typically have weaknesses that could lead to failures. Their method avoids these problems by using high-power machines and working with computer designs and simulations in which the problems can be worked out before making a part, allowing users to select the appropriate parameters – the laser power or distance between scan lines, for example, or powder thickness – to create high density parts consistently. The key with selective laser melting is computing the dimensions of the pool of liquid that is formed when the laser melts the metal powder particles. The pools should be sufficiently deep to melt through the powder into the substrate, which results in a high-density material and thus a high-density part. The Lawrence Livermore work is part of its Accelerated Certification of Additively Manufactured Metals Strategic Initiative, which is investigating how computer simulations can help efficiently determine additive-manufacturing process parameters. The researchers published their findings in the International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology. (EurekAlert)(Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)(The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology)

Showing 1 result.