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UK Researchers Create 3D Chocolate Printer

University of Exeter researchers have developed a 3D chocolate printer using a technique that deposits materials layer by layer to construct a dimensional object. The concept is commonly used in industry for creating plastic and metal products, but this is reportedly the first time the principles have been applied to chocolate. Printing with chocolate is challenging because specific, accurate heating and cooling between layers is needed to successfully print in 3D. Once a layer has been made, it must solidify before the machine prints successive layers. The chocolate’s flow rate must also be taken into account. The researchers devised new temperature and heating controls for their printer. They say several companies have expressed interest in the technology, which individuals could use to create custom candies in the shape of someone’s face or other special designs created on the computer. This isn’t the first food printing technology. Cornell University has also been worked on using liquefied foods as specialty inks. (SlashDot)(BBC)(University of Exeter)

Tiny Magnets Could Power Computer

Conventional microprocessors rely on electrons for power, but new research from the University of California, Berkeley, says that nanomagnets are promising replacements for electrons in conventional devices. Magnetic-based chips could be used to store data in lieu of moving electrons. Tiny magnets could also be used in logic circuits. The absence of moving electrons would enable a magnetic computer to consume 1 million times less energy per operation than existing computers, say researchers. They say that the key is making the magnets very small so that they are able to interact with each other. Thus far, they have reportedly constructed magnetic logic devices and memory from magnets about 100 nanometers wide and about 200 nanometers long. The group’s goal is to eventually construct a fully magnetic computer. The research results have been published in Physical Review Letters. (SlashDot)(ScienceDaily)(University of California, Berkeley)(Physical Review Letters)

Apple Taking a Bite of Mobile Market

The Apple iPad was responsible for 1 percent of the world's Web traffic and 2.1 percent of US internet traffic in June, according to the latest NetApplications tablet market share data. iPhone actually commands a larger market share, leading the pack among mobile devices in the US at 2.9 percent, followed closely by Android, which has a 2.6 percent market share. The analytics firm says that, as of June, mobile and tablet platforms now represent more than 5 percent of all Internet browsing. The mobile and tablet share in the US exceeds 8.2 percent. Competing for the market share with Apple are Samsung, Motorola, and Research in Motion, but Fortune deemed these companies’ shares “negligible” in comparison. (USA Today)(Fortune)(Net Applications)

New Organization Tasked with Combating Global Cybercrime

To engender the international cooperation needed to fight cybercrime, the UK government announced Tuesday the formation of the International Cyber Security Protection Alliance (ICSPA) a new, global alliance.  The non-profit will fund and provide expertise and training to law enforcement cyber crime units in an attempt to respond to global cybercrime threats. In February, the UK government estimated these types of crimes cost the British economy about £27 billion annually. In the past week alone, there have been high-profile attacks against the International Monetary Fund, the US Central Intelligence Agency, and the US Senate, and companies such as Citigroup and Lockheed Martin. These have seeded doubts regarding existing security as well as law enforcement’s ability to investigate and capture hackers. To be effective, however, requires a concerted international effort. “You've got to go beyond Europe. We need to make sure this doesn't turn into an all-English club," Rik Ferguson, director for security research at Trend Micro, told the BBC. “For a country like China, where infrastructure is being abused, there's no reason why they would not become a big part of ICSPA.” Other nations of concern include Brazil, Russia, and the Ukraine. Funding for the ICSPA is expected from the EU and various governments including New Zealand and Canada. Private companies participating reportedly include McAfee, Trend Micro, and Visa Europe. (Reuters)(BBC)

New Organization Tasked with Combating Global Cybercrime

To engender the international cooperation needed to fight cybercrime, the UK government announced Tuesday the formation of the International Cyber Security Protection Alliance (ICSPA) a new, global alliance.  The non-profit will fund and provide expertise and training to law enforcement cyber crime units in an attempt to respond to global cybercrime threats. In February, the UK government estimated these types of crimes cost the British economy about £27 billion annually. In the past week alone, there have been high-profile attacks against the International Monetary Fund, the US Central Intelligence Agency, and the US Senate, and companies such as Citigroup and Lockheed Martin. These have seeded doubts regarding existing security as well as law enforcement’s ability to investigate and capture hackers. To be effective, however, requires a concerted international effort. “You've got to go beyond Europe. We need to make sure this doesn't turn into an all-English club," Rik Ferguson, director for security research at Trend Micro, told the BBC. “For a country like China, where infrastructure is being abused, there's no reason why they would not become a big part of ICSPA.” Other nations of concern include Brazil, Russia, and the Ukraine. Funding for the ICSPA is expected from the EU and various governments including New Zealand and Canada. Private companies participating reportedly include McAfee, Trend Micro, and Visa Europe. (Reuters)(BBC)

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