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New Technology Builds Sensors by Drawing

Carbon nanotubes have proven to be a promising technology for use in detecting leaks of harmful gasses, constructing sensors made with the material is typically a challenging, hazardous process ill-suited for large-scale production. MIT researchers have developed a pencil lead made from stable, compressed carbon nanotubes that can be used with a regular mechanical pencil to draw sensors on any paper surface. The pencil is used on a sheet of paper imprinted with tiny gold electrodes. An electrical current is applied and, if the current changes any, this means gas present in the environment has bound to the carbon nanotubes. The researchers developed a sensor to detect small amounts of ammonia gas. The researchers say they can add metal atoms to the nanotube walls or wrapping various materials around the tubes to enable the sensors to detect a wide range of gases. The researchers published their work in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
(EurekAlert)(MIT News Office)(Angewandte Chemie)
Carbon nanotubes have proven to be a promising technology for use in detecting leaks of harmful gasses, constructing sensors made with the material is typically a challenging, hazardous process ill-suited for large-scale production. MIT researchers have developed a pencil lead made from stable, compressed carbon nanotubes that can be used with a regular mechanical pencil to draw sensors on any paper surface. The pencil is used on a sheet of paper imprinted with tiny gold electrodes. An electrical current is applied and, if the current changes any, this means gas present in the environment has bound to the carbon nanotubes. The researchers developed a sensor to detect small amounts of ammonia gas. The researchers say they can add metal atoms to the nanotube walls or wrapping various materials around the tubes to enable the sensors to detect a wide range of gases. The researchers published their work in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
(EurekAlert)(MIT News Office)(Angewandte Chemie)

Carbon nanotubes have proven to be a promising technology for use in detecting leaks of harmful gasses, constructing sensors made with the material is typically a challenging, hazardous process ill-suited for large-scale production. MIT researchers have developed a pencil lead made from stable, compressed carbon nanotubes that can be used with a regular mechanical pencil to draw sensors on any paper surface. The pencil is used on a sheet of paper imprinted with tiny gold electrodes. An electrical current is applied and, if the current changes any, this means gas present in the environment has bound to the carbon nanotubes. The researchers developed a sensor to detect small amounts of ammonia gas. The researchers say they can add metal atoms to the nanotube walls or wrapping various materials around the tubes to enable the sensors to detect a wide range of gases. The researchers published their work in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (EurekAlert)(MIT News Office)(Angewandte Chemie)

 

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