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Ken Kennedy Award

Deadline: 1 July 2015

NOMINATE  |  Nomination Questions (pdf)

The award nomination requires a minimum of 2 endorsements.
 
Established in memory of Ken Kennedy, the founder of Rice University's nationally ranked computer science program and one of the world's foremost experts on high-performance computing. A certificate and $5,000 honorarium are awarded jointly by the ACM and the IEEE Computer Society for outstanding contributions to programmability or productivity in high-performance computing together with significant community service or mentoring contributions.

 

Past recipients for Ken Kennedy Award

2013 Jack Dongarra For influential contributions to mathematical software, performance measurement, and parallel programming, and significant leadership and service within the HPC community.
2012 Mary Lou Soffa For contributions to compiler technology and software engineering, exemplary service to the profession, and lifelong dedication to mentoring and improving diversity in computing.
2011 Susan L. Graham For foundational compilation algorithms and programming tools; research and discipline leadership; and exceptional mentoring.
2010 David Kuck For his pioneering contributions to compiler technology and parallel computing, the profound impact of his research on industry, and the widespread and long-lasting influence of his teaching and mentoring.
2009

Francine Berman

For her influential leadership in the design, development and deployment of national-scale cyberinfrastructure, her-inspiring work as a teacher and mentor, and her exemplary service to the high performance community.

 

2014 Ken Kennedy Subcommittee Chair

MARY HALL
Mary W. Hall

University of Utah

 

The 2014 Ken Kennedy Award nominations cycle is closed.  The selected award winner will be announced in our Press Room, September 2014. 

>> Nomination site

Nomination Deadline: 1 July 2015  

 

 

Mary Lou Soffa Named Recipient of 2012 Ken Kennedy Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 16 October 2012 – Mary Lou Soffa of the University of Virginia will receive the ACM-IEEE Computer Society Ken Kennedy Award for contributions to detecting and managing software security flaws. She developed software tools for debugging and testing programs to eliminate or reduce false alarms and improve operating efficiency.  Her research produced automatic, practical solutions in software engineering, systems and programming languages for improving software reliability, security and productivity. Soffa will receive the Kennedy award on 13 November in Salt Lake City at SC12, the international conference on high-performance computing.

A leading researcher in programming languages, Soffa provided analytical and experimental models for understanding, predicting, and verifying the optimization of software.  In her recent work, she developed a unifying framework for optimizations which included code, optimization, and resources models.  Her model-based strategies enabled optimizing compilers to produce higher-quality code, and to employ different paradigms than those previously in use.

The Kennedy Award cited Soffa for "contributions to compiler technology and software engineering, exemplary service to the profession, and life-long dedication to mentoring and improving diversity in computing."  She is the Owen R. Cheatham Professor at the University of Virginia.

Soffa was elected an ACM Fellow in 1999, and received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from the White House the same year. In 2006, she received the Computing Research Association (CRA) Nico Habermann Award for contributions toward increasing the numbers and successes of underrepresented members in the computing research community.   

She has held leadership roles in prominent national and international organizations, among them CRA and CRA-W, the committee on the status of women in computer science and engineering of CRA, and ACM Special Interest Groups on Software Engineering (SIGSOFT) and Programming Languages (SIGPLAN). Soffa currently serves on the ACM Publications Board and was elected in 2008 and 2012 as a Member-at-Large of the ACM Council. A highly regarded speaker, she has also published more than 150 papers in computing journals and conferences.

A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh with a BS degree in Mathematics, Soffa received an MS degree in Mathematics from Ohio State University before earning a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining UVA, she was a professor and Graduate Dean in Arts and Sciences at Pitt.

 ACM and the Computer Society co-sponsor the Kennedy Award, which was established in 2009 to recognize substantial contributions to programmability and productivity in computing and significant community service or mentoring contributions. It was named for the late Ken Kennedy, founder of Rice University's computer science program and a world expert on high-performance computing. The Kennedy Award carries a US $5,000 honorarium endowed by the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture (SIGARCH) and the Computer Society.

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ACM-IEEE Computer Society Award Honors Intel's David Kuck

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 23 September, 2010 – The second annual ACM-IEEE Computer Society Ken Kennedy Award will go to Intel Fellow David Kuck for advances to compiler technology and parallel computing that have improved the cost-effectiveness of multiprocessor computing. In this era of multicore architectures and petascale supercomputers, Kuck's contributions have been critical in adapting software to effectively use new hardware. He is set to receive the award at SC10, the international conference on high-performance computing in New Orleans on 17 November.

Kuck's pioneering techniques are incorporated in every optimizing compiler in use today. His impact spans four decades and embraces a broad range of areas, including architecture design and evaluation, compiler technology, programming languages, and algorithms. During his career, he influenced the design of the Illiac IV, Burroughs BSP, Alliant FX, and Cedar parallel computers. The Kennedy Award also cited him for the widespread inspiration of his teaching and mentoring.

Kuck & Associates Inc. (KAI), the company Kuck founded in 1979, produced a line of industry-standard optimizing compilers that focused on exploiting parallelism. When KAI was acquired by Intel In March 2000, Kuck led the KAI Software Lab, a leading provider of performance-oriented compilers and programming tools used in the development of multithreaded applications. Multithreaded applications enable more efficient computing by spreading application workloads over multiple central processing units.

A professor of computer science and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign from 1965 to 1993, Kuck founded UIUC's computational sciences program. In 1983, he established its Center for Supercomputing Research and Development, which he directed for a decade. Kuck, an Intel Fellow, is currently a researcher in Intel's Software and Solutions Group, and is developing the hardware/software co-design of architectures, tools, and compilers based on performance, energy, and cost.

His awards for computer architecture and software design include the IEEE Piore Award and the ACM-IEEE Computer Society Eckert-Mauchly Award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, ACM, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

A graduate of the University of Michigan with a BS in electrical engineering, Kuck received both MS and PhD degrees in engineering from Northwestern University. He was a Ford Foundation postdoctoral fellow and assistant professor of electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

ACM and the Computer Society co-sponsor the Kennedy Award, which was established in 2009 to recognize substantial contributions to programmability and productivity in computing and significant community service or mentoring contributions. It was named for the late Ken Kennedy, founder of Rice University's computer science program and a world expert on high-performance computing. Kennedy's own work was heavily influenced by Kuck. While on sabbatical at IBM, Kuck provided Kennedy with access to his Parafrase system, generating the spark for Kennedy's research at both Rice and IBM.

The Kennedy Award carries a US $5,000 honorarium endowed by the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture (SIGARCH) and the Computer Society. The inaugural award went to grid computing pioneer Francine Berman, vice president for research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, for her leadership in building national-scale cyberinfrastructure.

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Nominees Sought for Ken Kennedy Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 9 March, 2009 – The IEEE Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery have created an award to honor the substantial research, service, and mentoring contributions of the late Ken Kennedy, the founder of Rice University's computer science program and one of the world's foremost experts on high-performance computing.

Kennedy, who passed away on 17 February, 2007, was a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He earned a B.A. in mathematics from Rice University in 1967 and went on to receive a M.S. in mathematics and a PhD in computer science from New York University. He returned to Rice University in 1971, where he founded its computer science department in 1984 and directed the Center for High Performance Software Research.

He helped establish its Computer and Information Technology Institute (CITI) in 1986, its Center for Research on Parallel Computation (CRPC) in 1989, and its Center for High Performance Software Research (HiPerSoft) in 2000.

Nominations are currently open for the first presentation of this award at SC09 in November. The award is open to contributors at all stages of their careers. The winner should have made an outstanding, innovative contribution or contributions to programming and productivity in computing, and also contributed to computing through teaching, mentoring, or community service. Anyone may make a nomination.

The award, to be presented annually, will consist of a certificate and $5,000 honorarium. The awardee will be invited to present a paper at the SC conference or at an ACM or IEEE Computer Society conference of the winner's choosing during the year following the announcement.

Members of the Kennedy Award committee include Jack Dongarra, University of Tennessee; William G. Griswold, University of California San Diego; Mary Hall, University of Utah; Kathryn McKinley, University of Texas at Austin; Daniel A. Reed, Microsoft; and Rob Schreiber (Chair), Hewlett-Packard Labs. Visit the Computer Society's awards site for future details of the nomination process and deadlines. 

 

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About the Computer Society

With nearly 85,000 members, the IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading organization of computing professionals. Founded in 1946, and the largest of the 39 societies of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Computer Society is dedicated to advancing the theory and application of computer and information-processing technology, and is known globally for its computing standards activities.

The Computer Society serves the information and career-development needs of today's computing researchers and practitioners with technical journals, magazines, conferences, books, conference publications, and online courses. Its Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) program for mid-career professionals and Certified Software Development Associate (CSDA) credential for recent college graduates confirm the skill and knowledge of those working in the field. The CS Digital Library (CSDL) is an excellent research tool, containing more than 250,000 articles from 1,600 conference proceedings and 26 CS periodicals going back to 1988.

From the Computer Society Press Room

2012 Ken Kennedy Award Session

SC 12 -  November 14, 2012 - Salt Lake City, UT

Honoring Mary Lou Soffa

2012 IEEE CS President, John Walz and
2012 ACM Awards Committee Chair, Cherri Pancake
present the 2012 Ken Kennedy Award to
Dr. Mary Lou Soffa.

Cick here to view award flyer.


 


~ Past Award Presentation ~

2011 Ken Kennedy Award Session

SC 11 -  November 15, 2011 - Seattle, WA

Honoring Susan Graham


2011 IEEE CS President, Sorel Reisman and ACM President, Alain Chesnais present the
2011 Ken Kennedy Award to Dr. Susan Graham.  Cick here to view award flyer.


~ Past Award Presentation ~  

2010 Ken Kennedy Award Section

New Orleans, LA - 18 November 2010

Honoring David J. Kuck

David J. Kuck receives the 2010 Ken Kennedy Award by Computer Society President, Sorel Reisman and ACM President, Alain Chesnais

 

~ Past Award Presentation ~  


2009 Ken Kennedy Award Session

SC 09 | 18 November 2009  |  Portland OR 

Honoring Francine Berman



Francine Berman receives
2009 Ken Kennedy Award by
Rangachar Kasturi, CS Past President & John White, ACM CEO