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Harlan D. Mills Award

Deadline for 2016 Nominations is 15 October 2015


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The award nomination requires a minimum of 3 endorsements.

Established in Harlan D. Mill's name to recognize researchers and practitioners who have demonstrated long-standing, sustained, and meaningful contributions to the theory and practice of the information sciences, focusing on contributions to the practice of software engineering through the application of sound theory. This technical award was first given in 1999. The award consists of a $3,000 honorarium, museum-quality memento, and a possible invited talk during the week of the annual International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), co-sponsored by IEEE Computer Society Technical Council on Software Engineering (TCSE).

Learn more about Harlan D. Mills here.

 

Past recipients for Harlan D. Mills Award

2014 Patrick Cousot
Radhia Cousot
For the invention of "abstract interpretation", development of tool support, and its practical application.
2012 Lionel Claude Briand For practical and fundamental contributions to Model-based Software Testing and Verification.
2011 John Rushby For practical and fundamental contributions to Software & Hardware Reliability with seminal contributions to computer security, fault tolerance, and formal methods.
2009 Bertrand Meyer For practical and fundamental contributions to object-oriented software engineering, software reuse, and the integration of formal methods into the above.
2007 Bev Littlewood For leading research on the application of rigorous probabilistic and statistical techniques to problems of assessment in software engineering, particularly in systems dependability.
2006 John C. Knight For encouraging software researchers to focus on practical results as well as theory, and for critically analyzing their assumptions and evaluating their research claims.
2004 Elaine Weyuker For leading research on rigorous software testing including industrial evaluations of the comparative effectiveness and costs of such testing methods.
2003 Victor R. Basili For significant contributions to programming languages, program reading and writing, and empirical methods.
2002 Jesse H. Poore For significant contributions to function-based software development and statistical software testing.
2001 Meir (Manny) Lehman For pioneering contributions to the empirical study of software processes and program evolution.
2000 Barry Boehm For development of empirical software engineering models of cost, schedule, and quality.
1999 David Parnas For fundamental contributions to large-scale systems development by establishing software engineering as an engineering discipline.

 

2014 HARLAN MILLS AWARD SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIR

Bertrand Meyer

2015 Nominations are closed.

NOMINATE

New Deadline for 2016 nominations is 15 OCT 2015

Patrick and Radhia Cousot Honored with 2014 Harlan D. Mills Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 11 April 2014 – Patrick and Radhia Cousot have been named  recipients of the 2014 IEEE Computer Society Harlan D. Mills Award for their invention of abstract interpretation and tools to support its implementation.
 
The Mills Award recognizes researchers and practitioners who have demonstrated longstanding contributions to information science theory and practice, focusing on applying sound theory to software engineering practice.
 
Abstract interpretation is a fundamental, general, and unifying theory of sound abstraction and approximation of the mathematical structures involved in the formal semantics, formal specification, static analysis, proof, and verification of computer systems and biological networks. Abstract interpretation can scale up and automatically verify very large systems in advanced real-world industrial applications in transportation, communications, and medicine.
 
Patrick Cousot is a professor of computer science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. Previously he was a professor at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, the École Polytechnique, the University of Metz, and Research Scientist at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) at the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, France. He holds a doctor ès sciences degree in mathematics from the University Joseph Fourier.
 
Radhia Cousot is an emeritus CNRS senior research scientist in computer science at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. She served as a CNRS junior research scientist, research scientist, and senior research scientist at the University Henri Poincaré of Nancy, University Paris-Sud at Orsay, and École Polytechnique, where she headed the Semantics, Proof, and Abstract interpretation research team. She holds a doctor ès sciences in mathematics from the University of Lorraine, Nancy, France.
 
Patrick Cousot was awarded the Silver Medal of the CNRS, an honorary doctorate from the Fakultät Mathematik und Informatik of the Universität des Saarlandes, the Grand Prix of Computer Science and its Applications of the EADS Corporate Research Foundation attributed by the French Academy of Sciences, a Humboldt Research Award. He is Member of the Academia Europæa.
 
Patrick Cousot and Radhia Cousot jointly received the ACM SIGPLAN Programming Languages Achievement Award.
 
The late Harlan D. Mills was widely recognized for his contributions as a mathematician concerned with bringing more rigor into systems and software development. The award, which consists of a $3,000 honorarium, memento, and possible invited talk, is co-sponsored by IEEE Computer Society Technical Council on Software Engineering (TCSE). For more information, visit http://www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/harlan.
 
About IEEE Computer Society
 
IEEE Computer Society is the world's leading computing membership organization and the trusted information and career-development source for a global workforce of technology leaders including: professors, researchers, software engineers, IT professionals, employers, and students. The unmatched source for technology information, inspiration, and collaboration, the IEEE Computer Society is the source that computing professionals trust to provide high-quality, state-of-the-art information on an on-demand basis. The Computer Society provides a wide range of forums for top minds to come together, including technical conferences,publications, and a comprehensive digital library, unique training webinars, professional training, and the TechLeader Training Partner Program to help organizations increase their staff's technical knowledge and expertise, as well as the personalized information tool myComputer. To find out more about the community for technology leaders, visit http://www.computer.org.
 
Previous recipients

Lionel Briand Named Winner of 2012 Mills Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 10 January, 2012 – Software verification, validation, and testing researcher Lionel Briand, a former IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering board member, has been named the winner of the 2012 Harlan D. Mills Award.

The Mills Award recognizes researchers and practitioners who have demonstrated longstanding contributions to information science theory and practice, focusing on applying sound theory to software engineering practice. Briand was recognized "for practical and fundamental contributions to model-based software testing and verification."

Former head of the Certus software verification and validation center at Simula Research Laboratory in Oslo, Norway, Briand recently became scientific director of the new software verification and validation laboratory at University of Luxembourg's Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT). The new laboratory is supported by a PEARL grant from the Luxembourg research fund (FNR).

At Simula's Certus software verification and validation center, Briand led and conducted research in close collaboration with industrial partners. Before that, he was a systems and computer engineering professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, and held the Canada Research Chair in Software Quality Engineering.

Briand was the first software quality engineering department head at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering in Germany, and worked as a research scientist for the Software Engineering Laboratory, a consortium of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Computer Sciences Corp., and the University of Maryland.

He has served on the program, steering, or organization committees of many international, IEEE and ACM conferences, and will be 2014 program co-chair of the International Conference of Software Engineering (ICSE).  Briand is coeditor-in-chief of Empirical Software Engineering (Springer) and is a member of the editorial boards of Systems and Software Modeling (Springer) and Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability (Wiley). He was on the board of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering from 2000 to 2004.

Briand was elevated to the grade of IEEE Fellow for his work on the testing of object-oriented systems. His research interests include: model-driven development, testing and verification, search-based software engineering, and empirical software engineering.


Previous recipients

John Rushby of SRI International Wins Mills Award

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 18 April, 2011 – John Rushby, a program director and SRI Fellow with SRI International's Computer Science Laboratory, is this year's recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Harlan D. Mills Award, which recognizes sustained contributions to information science theory and practice.

Rushby leads the research program in formal methods and dependable systems at SRI International in Menlo Park California. He received the Mills Award "for practical and fundamental contributions to software and hardware reliability with seminal contributions to computer security, fault tolerance, and formal methods."

Rushby joined SRI in 1983 and served as director of its Computer Science Laboratory from 1986 to 1990. Prior to that, he held academic positions at the universities of Manchester and Newcastle upon Tyne in England. He received BSc and PhD degrees in computing science from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1971 and 1977, respectively.

His research interests center on the use of formal methods for problems in the design and assurance of safe, secure, and dependable systems.

Rushby is a former associate editor for Communications of the ACM, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, and Formal Aspects of Computing, and was recently a member of a National Research Council study that produced the report "Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence?"

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Mills Award