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Supporting Scientists' Everyday Work: Automating Scientific Workflows
July/August 2008 (vol. 25 no. 4)
pp. 52-58
Mark Vigder, National Research Council Canada
Norman G. Vinson, National Research Council Canada
Janice Singer, National Research Council Canada
Darlene Stewart, National Research Council Canada
Keith Mews, National Research Council Canada
An action research project involving scientists from the National Research Council Canada and the Institute for Ocean Technology analyzed difficulties in using software to collect data and manage processes. The project identified three requirements for increasing research productivity: ease of use for end users, managing scientific workflows, and facilitating software interoperability. On the basis of these requirements, the researchers developed Sweet, a software framework, to help automate scientific workflows.

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Index Terms:
physical sciences and engineering, workflow management, office automation, information technology and systems applications, information technology and systems, user-centered design, user interfaces, information interfaces and representation, information technology and systems
Citation:
Mark Vigder, Norman G. Vinson, Janice Singer, Darlene Stewart, Keith Mews, "Supporting Scientists' Everyday Work: Automating Scientific Workflows," IEEE Software, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 52-58, July-Aug. 2008, doi:10.1109/MS.2008.97
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