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From the Horse's Mouth
November/December 2007 (vol. 24 no. 6)
pp. 21-23
Neil Maiden, City University, London
Ian Alexander, consultant
In this column, IEEE Software aims to bring you the latest in requirements thinking. Since Richard Wexelblat's pioneering 1976 paper, "Maxims for Malfeasant Designers," it's been clear that specification can be done well or poorly. More recently, Norman Ramsey has followed Wexelblat's lead with "Maxims for Malfeasant Speakers," with advice such as "Remember that form is more important than content: Make sure your visuals conform to corporate standards, even if they don't say anything of consequence." Similarly, Peter J. Brown's paper, "13 Deadly Sins of Compiler Writing," includes the memorable "The first deadly sin is to code before you think." That sin is certainly as prevalent today as ever it was. So, this column has scoured the planet for great minds on the latest in requirements. We're proud to bring you a tongue-in-cheek "interview" with industry guru Colin Codephirst.

1. R.L. Wexelblat, "Maxims for Malfeasant Designers, or How to Design Languages to Make Programming as Difficult as Possible," Proc. 2nd Int'l Conf. Software Eng. (ICSE 76), IEEE CS Press, 1976, pp. 331–336.
2. N. Ramsey, Maxims for Malfeasant Speakers, www.eecs.harvard.edu/~nr/miscbadtalks.html .
3. P.J. Brown, "13 Deadly Sins of Compiler Writing," Writing Interactive Compilers and Interpreters, John Wiley &Sons, 1979; www.eecs.harvard.edu/~nrsins.html.

Index Terms:
requirements
Citation:
Neil Maiden, Ian Alexander, "From the Horse's Mouth," IEEE Software, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 21-23, Nov.-Dec. 2007, doi:10.1109/MS.2007.164
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