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Anecdotes
April-June 2006 (vol. 28 no. 2)
pp. 70-76
Phillip A. Laplante Jr., Penn State University
This issue features two anecdotes: A son recounts his father's career and the second generation of computer pioneers, and Stanley Mazor discusses the origin of the first 8-bit microprocessor CPU, the Intel 8008.

1. I know this to be true because our home was littered with books in these languages. Also, he would take every opportunity to converse whenever he encountered a native speaker.
2. Where not otherwise noted, all quotations are derived from various versions of my father's resume, conversations with my father or mother, and various correspondence and documentation in my private collection including, various editions of his resume, job skills inventory, letters of reference and commendation, and course completion certificates.
1. R. Noyce and M. Hoff, "A History of Microprocessor Development at Intel," IEEE Micro, vol. 1, no. 1, 1981, pp. 8–21.
2. S. Mazor, "The History of the Microcomputer," Readings in Computer Architecture, N. Hill, M. Jouppi, and G. Sohi, eds., Morgan Kauffman, 2000, p. 60.
3. S. Mazor, "Micro to Mainframe," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 27, no. 2, April–June 2005, pp. 82–84.
4. M. Hoff and S. Mazor, "Operation and Application of MOS Shift Registers," Computer Design Magazine, Feb. 1971, pp. 57–62.
5. G. Bell, A. Newell, and D. Siewiorek eds., , Computer Structures: Principles and Examples, McGraw Hill, 1982.
6. Intel, 3101 64-bit Static RAM Data Sheet, 1970.
7. S. Mazor, "Programming and/or Logic Design," Proc. IEEE Computer Group Conf., IEEE Press, 1968, pp. 69–71.
8. V. Poor, "Letters," Fortune, Jan. 1976, p. 94.
9. Intel, MCS-8 User Manual, 1972.
10. G. Boone, Computing System CPU, US patent 3,757,306, to Texas Instruments, Patent and Trademark Office, 1973.
11. M. Hoff, S. Mazor, and F. Faggin, Memory System for a Multi-Chip Digital Computer, US patent 3,821,715, to Intel Corp., Patent and Trademark Office, 1974.
12. F. Faggin, M. Shima, and S. Mazor, MOS Computer Employing a Plurality of Separate Chips, US patent 4,010,449, to Intel Corp., Patent and Trademark Office, 1977.
13. M. Shima, F. Faggin, and S. Mazor, "An N-Channel Single Chip Microprocessor," Digest of Papers 1974 IEEE ISSCC, IEEE Press, 1974, pp. 56–57.
14. S. Morse et al., "Intel Microprocessors 8008 to 8086," Computer, Oct. 1980, pp. 42–60.

Citation:
Phillip A. Laplante Jr., Stanley Mazor, "Anecdotes," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 70-76, April-June 2006, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2006.23
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