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Software Science and Cognitive Psychology
March 1983 (vol. 9 no. 2)
pp. 166-171
N.S. Coulter, Department of Computer and Information Systems, Florida Atlantic University
Halstead proposed a methodology for studying the process of programming known as software science. This methodology merges theories from cognitive psychology with theories from computer science. There is evidence that some of the assumptions of software science incorrectly apply the results of cognitive psychology studies. HAlstead proposed theories relative to human memory models that appear to be without support from psychologists. Other software scientists, however, report empirical evidence that may support some of those theories. This anomaly places aspects of software science in a precarious position. The three conflicting issues discussed in this paper are 1) limitations of short-term memory and number of sub-routine parameters, 2) searches in human memory and programming effort, and 3) psychological time and programming time.
Index Terms:
Stroud number, Cognitive psychology, human memory models, human memory searches, long-term memory, programming effort, programming time, short-term memory, software science
Citation:
N.S. Coulter, "Software Science and Cognitive Psychology," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 166-171, March 1983, doi:10.1109/TSE.1983.236461
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