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Issue No.01 - January-March (2004 vol.1)
pp: 4-10
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
We are of course grateful to all the members of our first editorial board, international experts who have agreed to serve despite already full schedules; their names and biographies appear below.



Jacob A. Abraham received the bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Kerala, India, and the MS and PhD degrees from Stanford University. He joined the University of Texas at Austin in 1988, where he is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of computer sciences. He is also director of the Computer Engineering Research Center and holds a Cockrell Family Regents Chair in Engineering. His research interests include VLSI design and test, formal verification, and fault-tolerant computing. He has published extensively and has been included in a list of the most cited researchers inthe world. He has supervised more than 60 PhD dissertations and is particularly proud of the accomplishments of his students, many of whom occupy senior positions in academia and industry. He has served as an associate editor of several IEEE Transactions, and as chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Fault-Tolerant Computing. He has been elected a fellow of the IEEE as well as a fellow of the ACM, and has been named as the recipient of the 2005 IEEE Emmanuel R. Piore Award.



Jean Arlat received the Engineer degree from the National Institute of Applied Sciences of Toulouse in 1976, and the PhD and Docteur ès-Sciences degrees from the National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse in 1979 and 1990, respectively. He is Directeur de Recherche with CNRS, the French National Organization of Scientific Research, and currently leads the research group on dependable computing and fault tolerance at LAAS-CNRS. His research interests focus on the dependability of hardware and software fault-tolerant systems and the dependability characterization of off-the-shelf software operating systems, including both analytical modeling approaches and controlled experiments using fault injection. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 papers and three books on these subjects. He has served as chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Fault-Tolerant Computing in 1994-1995. He is currently chairman of the IFIPWorking Group 10.4 on Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance and vice chair of the steering committee of the IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks.



Steven M. Bellovin received the BA degree from Columbia University, and the MS and PhD degreesin computer scence from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While a graduate student, he helped create netnews; for this, he and the other perpetrators were awarded the 1995 Usenix Lifetime Achievement Award. He joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1982. Despite the fact that he has not changed jobs, he is now at AT&T Labs Research, working on networks, security, and why the two don't get along, as well as related public policy questions. He is an AT&T fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is the coauthor of Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker (Addison-Wesley, 1994), and holds several patents on cryptographic and network protocols. He served on US National Research Council study committees on information systems trustworthiness and the privacy implications of authentication technologies; he was also a member of the information technology subcommittee of an NRC study group on science versus terrorism. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1996-2002 and he is currently the codirector of the Security Area of the IETF.



Elisa Bertino is a professor of computer sciences in the Computer Science Department at Purdue University and serves as the research director of CERIAS. She is also a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science and Communication at the University of Milan where she is the director of the DB&SEC laboratory. She has been a visiting researcher at the IBM Research Laboratory (now Almaden) in San Jose, at the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation, at Rutgers University, and at Telcordia Technologies.



Crispin Cowan received the PhD degree from the University of Western Ontario and the MS degree in mathematics from the University of Waterloo. He is the CTO and founder of Immunix, Inc., where he leads security technology research and development. He developed Immunix, a host security/survivability technology project for DARPA that includes prominent technologies like theStackGuard compiler defense against buffer overflows. Dr. Cowan also coinvented the "time-to-patch"method of assessing when it is safe to apply a security patch. He holds a formerly full-time and continuing adjunct professor position with the Oregon Graduate Institute in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.



George Cybenko, Dorothy and Walter Gramm Professor of Engineering, Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, received the BSc degree in mathematics at the University of Toronto, and the MA degree in mathematics and the PhD degree in electrical engineering both from Princeton University. He has taught on the computer science faculty at Tufts University and was professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. At Illinois, he was also a director of the university's Center for Supercomputing Research and Development. He has served as an editor for seven mathematics, computer, and information theory publications, has helped organize a dozen conferences and symposia, and has published more than 50 journal papers, book chapters, and conference proceedings. He has also delivered more than 100 research lectures at universities, symposia, and colloquia around the world.



Marc Dacier received the degree of Ingénieur Civil en Informatique from the University of Louvain, Belgium, in 1989 and the PhD degree, European Label, from the Institut National Polytechnique in Toulouse, France, in 1994. From 1989 until 1991, he worked at the University of Louvain. From 1992 until 1994, he was a member of the Dependability Group, at LAAS-CNRS in Toulouse, working in the Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance group on quantitative evaluation of operational computer security. In 1995, he worked in Paris as a security consultant. In 1996, he joined the IBM Zurich Research laboratory. In 1997, he became the manager of the Global Security Analysis Lab. The GSAL team pursued several projects in the intrusion detection domain which led to the creation of the new Tivoli Intrusion detection product, namely, Tivoli Risk Manager. Since 1997, he has been giving, as an invited researcher, an intrusion detection seminar at the University of Louvain (UCL), Namur (FUNDP), and Liège (ULG) and also at the ENSEEIHT in Toulouse. In 2002, he received the title of invited professor at UCL and associate professor at ULG. In 1998, he cofounded, with Kathleen Jackson from the Los Alamos National Lab, the Symposium on Recent Advances on Intrusion Detection (RAID), where he is now chairing its steering committee. He also was the codirector, with Brian Randell from the University of Newcsastle, of the MAFTIA European Project. He serves on the program committees of major security and dependability conferences and is a member of the steering committee of the European Symposium on Research for Computer Security (ESORICS). He joined the Corporate Communications Department at Eurecom in July 2002 as a professor. His research and teaching interests include computer and network security, intrusion detection, network and system management, and dependability in the presence of malicious faults. He is the author of numerous international publications and several patents.



E.N. (Mootaz) Elnozahy received the BSc degree with honors in electrical engineering from Cairo University in 1984, and the MS and PhD degrees in computer science from Rice University in 1990 and 1993, respectively. He is a senior manager and a master inventor at IBM Research in Austin, Texas. From 1993 until 1997, he was on the faculty at the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, where he received a prestigious US National Science Foundation CAREER award. Since 1997, he has been with the IBM Austin Research Lab, where he started the Systems Software Department, which he currently leads. Prior to joining IBM, he worked on rollback-recovery, replication, and reliable distributed systems. While at IBM, he has worked on code and trace compression, cc-NUMA systems, acceleration of the Web site performance for the Bureau of US Census, blade-based servers, security, and performance tools. He currently leads the Productive, Easy-to-Use, Reliable Computing System (PERCS) project, which is IBM's effort under DARPA's HPCS initiative. He is also an adjunct associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and has consulted with Bell Labs, Bellcore, the US National Science Foundation, and the state of Texas. He has served on 21 technical program committees in the areas of distributed operating systems and reliability. His research interests include distributed systems, operating systems, computer architecture, and fault tolerance. He has published 31 refereed articles in these areas, and was awarded 15 patents.



Virgil D. Gligor received the BSc, MSc, and PhD degrees from the University of California at Berkeley. He has been at the University of Maryland since 1976, and is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering. Over the past 25 yesrs, his research interests ranged from access control mechanisms, penetration analysis, and denial-of-service protection to cryptographic protocols and applied cryptography. He was a consultant to Burroughs (1977-1981) and IBM (1984-1999) Corporations, and is currently serving on Microsoft's Trusted Computing Academic Advisory Board. He served the profession as the chair of cochair of several conferences and symposia including IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium, Internet Society's Network and Distributed Systems Security Symposium, IEEE Dependable Computing for Critical Applications, and IEEE-ACM Symposium on Relaibility in Distributed Software and Databases. He received the outstanding paper award at the 1988 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. He was a member of several US Government INFOSEC Study Groups that set research agendas in information security, and served on a National Research Council panel on information security. He was an editorial board member of Information Systems (1984-1994), the Journal of Computer Security (1991-2000), and is currently an editorial board member of the ACM Transactions on Information System Security.



Sy-Yen Kuo received the BS degree (1979) in electrical engineering from National Taiwan University, the MS degree (1982) in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the PhD degree (1987) in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1991, he has been with National Taiwan University, where he is currently a professor and the head of the Department of Electrical Engineering. He spent his sabbatical year as a visiting researcher at AT&T Labs-Research, New Jersey, from 1999 to 2000. He was the chairman of the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan, from 1995 to 1998, a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona from 1988 to 1991, and an engineer at Fairchild Semiconductor and Silvar-Lisco, both in California, from 1982 to 1984. In 1989, he also worked as a summer faculty fellow at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of California Institute of Technology. His current research interests include software reliability engineering, mobile computing, dependable systems and networks, and opticalWDM networks. He is an IEEE Fellow for his contributions to dependable computing and software reliability engineering. He has published more than 200 papers in journals and conferences. He received the distinguished research award (1997-2005) from the National Science Council, Taiwan. He was also a recipient of the Best Paper Award in the 1996 International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering, the Best Paper Award in the simulation and test category at the 1986 IEEE/ACM Design Automation Conference (DAC), the US National Science Foundation's Research Initiation Award in 1989, and the IEEE/ACM Design Automation Scholarship in 1990 and 1991.



Carl Landwehr is a senior research scientist at the University of Maryland's Institute for Systems Research. He is presently on assignment to the US National Science Foundation (NSF) as coordinator of the new Cyber Trust theme in the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate. Prior to this, he was the initial program director of the Trusted Computing program at the NSF, while serving as senior fellow at Mitretek Systems. At Mitretek, he led support for several DARPAprograms in information assurance and survivability. For many years, he headed the Computer Security Section of the Center for High Assurance Computer Systems at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he led research projects to advance technologies of computer security and high-assurance systems. He was the founding chair of IFIP WG 11.3 (Database and Application Security) and is also a member of IFIP WG 10.4 (Dependability and Fault Tolerance). He has received best paper awards from the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy and the Computer Security Applications Conference. IFIP has awarded him its Silver Core, and the IEEE Computer Society has awarded him its Golden Core. He served on the computer science faculty at Purdue University, and he has taught courses on topics in computer science and information security at Georgetown, the University of Maryland, and Virginia Tech. His research interests span many aspects of trustworthy computing, including high assurance software development, understanding software flaws and vulnerabilities, token-based authentication, system evaluation and certification methods, multilevel security, and architectures for intrusion tolerant systems.



Jean-Claude Laprie is Directeur de Recherche at CNRS, the French National Organization for Scientific Research. He joined LAAS-CNRS in 1968, where he founded the research group on fault tolerance and dependable computing in 1975, that he directed until he became the director of LAAS, in 1997. His research has focused on dependable computing since 1973 and especially on fault tolerance and on dependability evaluation, subjects on which he has authored and coauthored more than 100 papers, as well as coauthored or edited several books. He has also been very active in the formulation of the basic concepts of dependability and the associated terminology; the views developed being widely adopted by the scientific community. His activities have included a large number of collaborations with industry, culminating in the foundation of LIS in 1992, the Laboratory for Dependability Engineering, a joint academia-industry laboratory, that he directed until 1996. He has several highlevel involvements in the French community, including the chairmanship of the National Coordination Committee for the Sciences and Technologies of Information and Communication. He has also been very active in the international community, including the chairmanship of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Fault-Tolerant Computing in 1984-1985, of the IFIP (International Federation for Information Processing) WG 10.4 on Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance from 1986 to 1995, of IFIP TC 10 on Computer System Technology from 1997 to 2001. He is currently a vice-president of IFIP, and the representant of France in its General Assembly. He received the IFIP Silver Core in 1992, the Silver Medal of the French Scientific Research in 1993, and the National Merit Medal in December 2002.



Nancy Leveson is a professor in the MIT Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and also a professor in the MIT Engineering Systems Division. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). She conducts research on the topics of system safety, software safety, software and system engineering, and human-computer interaction. She has served as editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. In 1999, she received the ACM Allen Newell Award and in 1995 the AIAA Information Systems Award for "developing the field of software safety and for promoting responsible software and system engineering practices where life and property are at stake." She is author of the book, Safeware: System Safety and Computers (Addison-Wesley).



Roy A. Maxion received the PhD degree in 1985 from the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is a principal systems scientist on the faculty of the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and director of the Dependable Systems Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University. He is also joint faculty with CMU: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, CyLab (for secure, trustworthy, sustainable, and available computing); Institute for Complex Engineered Systems; Human-Computer Interaction Institute; and Center for Automated Learning and Discovery. His research interests include all aspects of dependable systems: fault tolerance and reliability, tolerance of malicious faults (intrusion detection), survivable systems (information warfare defense), dependable software, the interface between cognitive science and dependability (e.g., dependable user interfaces), and dependable documentation. His central interest is in automated diagnosis and anomaly detection for fault localization in various domains, including semiconductor fabrication, computer security (intrusion, masquerader/insider, and fraud detection), software, and self-healing, autonomic systems. He has authored more than three dozen papers and book chapters, and has consulted for both industry and government, including the Pentagon and the US Department of State. He was program cochair of the 2001 International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN), a program committee member for numerous conferences (e.g., DSN, Performance and Dependability Symposium (PDS), Recent Advances in Intrusion Detection (RAID), and IEEE Security and Privacy (Oakland)). He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, and is active in the International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP) 10.4 Working Group on Dependability. He served on the US Defense Science Board, Task Force on Technology for Information Warfare Defense, as well as on the 2003 Defense Science Board on Roles and Missions of the DoD in Homeland Security. He chaired the 2004 IFIP 10.4 International Workshop on Dependable User Interfaces in Siena, Italy. He is on the DSN steering committee, and on the executive board of the IEEE Technical Committee on Fault Tolerance. He is vice-chairman of Professionals for Cyber Defense.



Catherine Meadows received the AB degree in mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1975, and the PhD degree in mathematics from the University of Illinois in 1981. She heads the Formal Methods Section in the Center for High Assurance Computer Systems at the Naval Research Laboratory. She is the principal designer of the NRL Protocol Analyzer, one of the first software tools to be used successfully for cryptographic protocol analysis, and has long been one of the leading figures in this area. She has also worked on projects relating to information hiding, the design of secure database management systems, the design of secure message processing systems, and the role of computer security in complex systems design. She is active in the Internet Engineering Task Force, promoting the use of formal methods in the analysis of developing standards; she has performed analyses of the Internet Key Exchange (IKE) Protocol and the Group Domain of Interpretation Protocol, and serves on the IETF Security Directorate. She has published more than 75 papers on formal methods, cryptography, and security, and has chaired program committees for many technical conferences. She currently serves as co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal on Information Security, as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computer Systems, and as vice-chair of IFIPWorking Group 1.7 on Foundations of Security Analysis and Design. Prior to joining the Naval Research Laboratory in 1985, Dr. Meadows was an assistant professor in the Texas A&M Math Department from 1981 to 1985.



Michael Reiter received the BSc degree in mathematical sciences from the University of North Carolina in 1989, and the MSc and PhD degrees in computer science from Cornell University in 1991 and 1993, respectively. He is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and computer science at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He joined AT&T Bell Labs in 1993 and became a founding member of AT&T Labs–Research when NCR and Lucent Technologies (including Bell Labs) were split away from AT&T in 1996. He returned to Bell Labs in 1998 as the director of Secure Systems Research, and then joined Carnegie Mellon in 2001. His research interests include all areas of computer and communications security and distributed computing. He regularly publishes and serves on conference organizing committees in these fields, and has served as program chair for the flagship computer security conferences of the IEEE, the ACM, and the Internet Society. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the ACM Transactions on Information and System Security, on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing and the International Journal of Information Security, and on the board of visitors for the Software Engineering Institute. He previously served on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering during 2000-2004, and as chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Security and Privacy from 2002-2003.



André Schiper graduated in physics from the ETHZ in Zurich in 1973, and received the PhD degree in computer science from the EPFL (Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland) in 1980. He has been a professor of computer science at EPFL since 1985, leading the Distributed Systems Laboratory. During the academic year of 1992-1993, he was on sabbatical at the University of Cornell, Ithaca, New York. His research interests are in the areas of dependable distributed systems, middleware support for dependable systems, replication techniques (including for database systems), group communication, distributed transactions, and recently mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). From 2000 to 2002, he was the chair of the steering committee of the International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC). He has taken part in several European projects and is currently also a member of the editorial board of the ACM Distributed Computing journal.



Fred B. Schneider received the BS degree from Cornell University, the MS and PhD degrees ('78) from the State University of New York Stony Brook, and the DSc degree (honoris causa) from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne ('03). He is a professor in Cornell's Computer Science Department and director of the AFRL/Cornell Information Assurance Instutute. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the ACM, and was named professor-at-large at the University of Tromso (Norway) in 1996. He is author of the graduate text On Concurrent Programming, and is coauthor (with David Gries) of the undergraduate text A Logical Approach to Discrete Math. In addition to chairing the National Research Council's study committee on information systems trustworthiness and editing Trust in Cyberspace, he is comanaging editor of Springer-Verlag's Texts and Monographs in Computer Science, associate editor-in-chief of IEEE Security and Privacy, and serves on several other journal editorial boards. A member of industrial technical advisory boards for FAST ASA, CIGITAL, Fortify, and Intel, Schneider chairs Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board. He also serves on the US National Science Foundation CISE Advisory Board and the National Research Council's CSTB. He was founding chief scientist of New York State's Griffiss Institute cybersecurity consortium and currently serves as a member of the board of directors and as its science advisor. His research concerns problems associated with making distributed and concurrent systems trustworthy. His early work was in formal methods and methodologies for concurrent programming and in protocols for fault-tolerance. More recently, his attention has turned to topics in computer security.



Neeraj Suri received the PhD degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He currently holds the TU Darmstadt Chair Professorship in "Dependable Embedded Systems and Software" at TU Darmstadt, Germany, and is also affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin. His earlier academic appointments include the Saab Endowed Professorship and faculty at Boston University. His research interests focus on design, analysis, and assessment of distributed, dependable embedded systems and software. His current research is emphasizing 1) robustness hardening of software/OS's, 2) verification and validation of protocols, embedded software, and operating systems, and 3) "trusted/secure systems by design" for SW and OS's. His group's research activities have garnered support from DARPA, NSF, ONR, European Commission, NASA, Boeing, Microsoft, Intel, Saab, Volvo, and Daimler Chrysler among others. He is also a recipient of the US NSF CAREER award. He serves as an editor for ACM Computing Surveys covering embedded systems and real-time, and has been an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems. He is a member of IFIP WG 10.4 on Dependability, a senior member of IEEE, and also on the board for Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board. Further professional details are available at: http://www.deeds.informatik.tu-darmstadt.de/suri.



Bhavani Thuraisingham is the program director for Cyber Trust and Data and Applications Security at the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and has been on IPAto NSF from the MITRE Corporation since October 2001. She is part of a team at the US NSF setting directions for cyber security and data mining for counter-terrorism. She has been with MITRE since January 1989 where she was the department head in Data and Information Management in the Information Technology Division and later chief scientist in data management in MITRE's Information Technology Directorate. She has conducted research in secure databases for more than 18 years and is the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society's 1997 Technical Achievement Award and IEEE's 2003 Fellow Award for her work in database security. She is also a 2003 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has published more than 200 refereed conference papers and more than 60 journal articles in secure data management and information technology. She serves (or has served) on editorial boards of journals including the IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, ACM Transactions on Information and Systems Security, the Journal of Computer Security, and the Computer Standards and Interface Journal. She is the inventor of three patents for MITRE on database inference control and has written six books on data management and data mining for technical managers and is currently writing a text book on database and application security based on her work the past 18 years. She will be joining the University of Texas at Dallas as a professor of computer science and the director of the Cyber Security Research Center in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering in Fall 2004 and will continue to work at MITRE and consult on projects for the Department of Treasury and the US Department of Defense.



Kishor S. Trivedi holds the Hudson Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. He is the Duke-Site Director of an the US National Science Foundation Industry-University Cooperative Research Center between NC State University and Duke University for carrying out applied research in computing and communications. He has been on the Duke faculty since 1975. He is the author of a well-known text entitled, Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing and Computer Science Applications, with a thoroughly revised second edition being published by John Wiley. He has also published two other books entitled, Performance and Reliability Analysis of Computer Systems, (Kluwer Academic Publishers) and Queueing Networks and Markov Chains (John Wiley). His research interests are in reliability and performance assessment of computer and communication systems. He has published more than 300 articles and lectured extensively on these topics. He has supervised 39 PhD dissertations. He is a fellow of the IEEE. He is a Golden Core Member of the IEEE Computer Society. He is a codesigner of HARP, SAVE, SHARPE, and SPNP software packages that have been well circulated.



Paulo Veríssimo is currently a professor in the Department of Informatics, University of Lisboa Faculty of Sciences ( http://www.di.fc.ul.pt/~pjv). He is coordinator of the CORTEX IST/FET project ( http://cortex.di.fc.ul.pt) and is on the executive board of the CaberNet European Network of Excellence. He is chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Fault Tolerant Computing. He leads the Navigators research group of LASIGE, and is currently interested in architecture, middleware, and protocols for dependable distributed systems, namely, the facets of adaptive real-time and fault/intrusion tolerance. He is the author of more than 100 refereed publications in international scientific conferences and journals in the area and he is coauthor of four books.



Michael Waidner received the doctorate degree in computer science from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. He is senior manager of security and privacy at the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. He is also an institute executive of the IBM Privacy Research Institute. Since he joined IBM in 1994, he has been working on various projects in enterprise privacy and identity management technologies, secure electronic commerce, dependability in distributed systems, provably secure cryptographic primitives, and formal verification of cryptographic protocols. Before joining IBM, he was a lecturer at the University of Karlsruhe, working and teaching on various aspects of cryptography, security, and fault tolerance. He is the author of more than 100 research papers on security, privacy, and cryptography, and served on the program committees of several international conferences on these topics. He is a fellow of the IEEE and member of the ACM, the IACR, the IAPP, and the GI.



Elaine Weyuker received the PhD degree in computer science from Rutgers University, and the MSE degree from the Moore School of Electrical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania. She is currently a technology leader at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, New Jersey, and an AT&T fellow. Before moving to AT&T Labs in 1993, she was a professor of computer science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences of New York University, New York, where she had been on the faculty since1977. Prior to that, she was a faculty member at the City University of New York, and was a systems' engineer at IBM and a programmer at Texaco, Inc. She has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, is a fellow of the ACM, a fellow of the IEEE, and an AT&T Fellow. She is the 2004 recipient of the IEEE Harlan D. Mills award for long-standing, sustained and meaningful contributions to the theory and practice of the information sciences. She was also awarded the YWCA Woman of Achievement Award, and was named the Outstanding Alumni at the Rutgers University 50th Anniversary celebration,as well as the AT&T Chairman's award for her mentoring activities and efforts to foster diversity. She is a member of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association (CRA). She also serves on the technical advisory board of Cigital Corporation. She is a member of the editorial boards of IEEE Spectrum, IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, the Empirical Software Engineering Journal, and the Journal of Systems and Software, and was a founding editor of the ACM Transactions of Software Engineering and Methodology. She has been the secretary/treasurer of ACM SIGSOFT and was an ACM National Lecturer. Her research interests are in software engineering, particularly software testing and reliability, and software performance and metrics. She has published more than 120 papers in journals and refereed conference proceedings in those areas, and has been a frequent keynote speaker at software engineering conferences. She is also interested in the theory of computation, and is the author of a book (with Martin Davis and Ron Sigal), Computability, Complexity, and Languages (second edition, Academic Press).

For information on obtaining reprints of this article, please send e-mail to: tsdc@computer.org.

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