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Scene Segmentation from Visual Motion Using Global Optimization
February 1987 (vol. 9 no. 2)
pp. 220-228
David W. Murray, GEC Research Ltd., Long Range Research Laboratory, Hirst Research Centre, East Lane, Wembley HA9 7PP, England.
Bernard F. Buxton, GEC Research Ltd., Long Range Research Laboratory, Hirst Research Centre, East Lane, Wembley HA9 7PP, England.
This paper presents results from computer experiments with an algorithm to perform scene disposition and motion segmentation from visual motion or optic flow. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion is used to formulate what the best segmentation or interpretation of the scene should be, where the scene is assumed to be made up of some fixed number of moving planar surface patches. The Bayesian approach requires, first, specification of prior expectations for the optic flow field, which here is modeled as spatial and temporal Markov random fields; and, secondly, a way of measuring how well the segmentation predicts the measured flow field. The Markov random fields incorporate the physical constraints that objects and their images are probably spatially continuous, and that their images are likely to move quite smoothly across the image plane. To compute the flow predicted by the segmentation, a recent method for reconstructing the motion and orientation of planar surface facets is used. The search for the globally optimal segmentation is performed using simulated annealing.
Citation:
David W. Murray, Bernard F. Buxton, "Scene Segmentation from Visual Motion Using Global Optimization," IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 220-228, Feb. 1987, doi:10.1109/TPAMI.1987.4767896
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