Editorial and Changes to the Editorial Board
January 2013 (VOL. 62, No. 1) pp. 1-6
/13/$31.00 © 2013 IEEE

Published by the IEEE Computer Society
Editorial and Changes to the Editorial Board
Ramesh Govindan

Ram Ramanathan
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On behalf of our Associate Editors, the TMC Steering Committee, and the TMC staff, we wish you a happy and prosperous New Year!
Over the past few years, the societal and economic impact of mobile computing has been steadily increasing to the point where mobile devices will soon be the primary computing device for a large number of users. With this development, the importance and the potential for impact of academic research in mobile computing has grown dramatically. As the premier journal in the field, TMC is in a unique position to shape academic thought and industry directions in various aspects of mobile computing. As ever, we look to you, our readers and contributors, to submit high-quality research work that moves this exciting field in new directions.
In this, the last year of our term, we hope to continue to publish thoughtful and deep research manuscripts that, we hope, will increase TMC’s stature. In addition, we plan to bring you outstanding papers from highly selective mobile computing conferences in special sections of upcoming issues. In doing so, our aim is to expose our readership to cutting-edge research on impactful problems of relatively immediate importance.
Our editorial board continues to perform outstanding service to the mobile computing community, and for this we are very grateful. The board has evolved this year, and we take this opportunity to welcome several new Associate Editors: Prithwish Basu, Carla Fabiana-Chiasserini, Ahmed Helmy, Vana Kalogeraki, Richard J. La, Xiang-Yang Li, Cecilia Mascolo, Tommaso Melodia, Guevara Noubir, Andrea Richa, Lakshminarayanan Subramanian, Karthikeyan Sundaresan, Xinbing Wang, Edmund Yeh, Yanyong Zhang, and Lin Zhong. They collectively strengthen our expertise in disruption-tolerant networking, vehicular networks, mobile computing systems, wireless security, mobile social networks, wireless network optimization, game theory, cognitive radios, and information theory. We are excited to have them on board and thank them for agreeing to serve.
Finally, we’d also like to acknowledge several Associate Editors whose terms recently expired: Tajana Simunic-Rosing, Sajal Das, Paolo Santi, Terry Todd, Wade Trappe, Nalini Venkatasubramanian, Mary Ann Ingram, Ekram Hossain, Chiara Petrioli, Alex Snoeren, Prasant Mohapatra, and Yunhao Liu. This very distinguished group of researchers has contributed greatly to increasing the journal’s quality and reputation, and they will be missed! We wish them the best in their future endeavors.
Ramesh Govindan, Editor-in-Chief
Ram Ramanathan, Associate Editor-in-Chief





Prithwish Basu received the BTech degree in computer science and engineering in 1996 from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and the MS and PhD degrees in computer engineering in 1999 and 2003, respectively, from Boston University. He is a senior scientist at Raytheon BBN Technologies. He has played leading roles in several US Department-of-Defense-funded research and development programs at BBN. His research interests include network science, energy efficiency and routing issues in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks, and theoretical aspects of networking in general. He is a technical lead of the ongoing Network Science Collaborative Technology Alliance (NS CTA) program, which is a collaborative research program involving more than 30 university and industrial R&D partners and US Army Research Labs—the program is attempting to develop the science of interacting communications, social, and information networks. He is also the principal investigator for BBN in the US/UK International Technology Alliance (ITA) program. He has published more than 65 papers in leading networking journals and conferences. He received the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Technology Review’s TR35 award in 2006. This award is given to the top 35 young innovators under the age of 35. He is a guest editor for the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications special issue on network science (target publication date: February 2013); a TPC cochair for the IEEE PERCOM workshop on Information Quality and Quality of Service (IQ2S 2013); and member of the TPC of IEEE INFOCOM 2013 and ICDCN 2013. In the recent past, he has served on the program committees of IEEE INFOCOM 2009-2012, ALGOSENSORS 2012, IEEE SECON 2010-2012, IEEE GlobeCom 2009, IEEE WoWMoM 2010, ACM Challenged Networks (CHANTS) 2007-2008, and DCOSS 2008. Recently, he has also been an expert reviewer for the Science and PLoS-One journals. Additionally, he has served on a doctoral dissertation committee at the University of Pennsylvania, on US National Science Foundation proposal review panels, as well as on the National Research Council’s Committee for Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies (from 2007 to 2010).





Carla-Fabiana Chiasserini received the laurea degree cum laude in 1996 from the University of Florence and the PhD degree in 2000 from the Politecnico di Torino. She is currently an associate professor with the Department of Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering at Politecnico di Torino and a Research Associate at the Institute for Electronics, Information, and Telecommunication Engineering of the National Research Consortium, Italy (IEIIT-CNR). In 1996, she was a visiting scholar with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. From 1998 to 2003, she was a visiting researcher with the Center for Wireless Communications and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, University of California at San Diego. Her research interests are in the field of wireless communications and networking. She has published more than 200 papers, among which more than 65 appear in highly prestigious refereed journals. She also holds three patents. She has been involved in organizing several international conferences, including IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE/ACM MobiCom, ACM MobiHoc, IEEE ICC, and IEEE GlobeCom. She has been the TPC chair of ACM MobiHoc 2009, ACM/IEEE MSWiM 2003-2005, and IEEE/IFIP WONS 2006, and the general chair of IEEE/MSWiM and IEEE/IFIP WONS 2012. She has served as an associate editor for Computer Communications, I EEE Wireless Communications Magazine, and IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications. She also serves on the Advisory Board-SWAT Team of IEEE Communications Letters. Her h-index is 33. She is a senior member of IEEE. For more information, please visit http://www.telematica.polito.it/public/faculty/carla-fabiana-chiasserini.





Ahmed Helmy received the BS degree in electrical engineering in 1992 and the MS degree in engineering mathematics in 1994 from Cairo University, Egypt, the MS degree in electrical engineering in 1995 from the University of Southern California (USC), and the PhD degree in computer science in 1999 from USC. He is currently an associate professor in the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Department at the University of Florida (UF) and the founder and director of the Mobile Networking Laboratory. He was a key researcher in the Network Simulator NS-2 and Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) projects at USC/ISI from 1995-1999. Before joining UF in 2006, he was on the Electrical Engineering Department faculty at USC starting Fall 1999. In 2002, he received the US National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award for his research on resource discovery and mobility modeling in large-scale wireless networks (MARS 2002-2008). In 2000, he received the Zumberge Award, and in 2002, he received the best paper award from the IEEE/IFIP MMNS Conference. In 2003, he was the Electrical Engineering nominee for the USC Engineering Junior Faculty Research Award and a nominee for the Sloan Fellowship. He was a winner in the ACM MobiCom 2007 SRC and in the ACM MobiCom WiNTech demo competition 2010. He is a leader of NSF-funded projects: Mars, Stress, Acquire, & Aware. His research interests include the design, analysis, and measurement of wireless ad hoc, sensor and mobile social networks; mobility modeling; multicast protocols; IP mobility; and network simulation. He has published more than 200 journal articles, conference papers and posters, book chapters, and IETF RFCs/IDs. His research is or has been supported by grants from the NSF, Intel, Cisco, DARPA, NASA, Nortel, HP, Pratt & Whitney, Siemens, and Silicon Graphics. He has been an area editor of IEEE Computer (2010-present) and Elsevier’s Ad Hoc Networks Journal (2004-2011). He is or was the cochair of ACM MobiSys HotPlanet 2012, general chair of ACM MSWiM 2011, honorary chair for IEEE IWCMC 2011, cochair for ACM MobiCom CHANTS 2011, cochair for ICST AdHocNets 2011, poster cochair for IEEE SECON 2011, general chair for ACM IWCMC 2010, track chair for IEEE MASS 2010, track chair, poster, and PhD forum chair for IEEE ICNP 2009, local arrangements chair for IEEE ICNP 2008 and IEEE INFOCOM Global Internet (GI) workshop 2008, cochair of IFIP/IEEE MMNS 2006, and vice-chair for IEEE ICPADS 2006 and IEEE HiPC 2007. He was the ACM SIGMOBILE workshop coordination chair for MobiCom, MobiHoc, MobiSys, and SenSys from 2006-2011. He has served on numerous committees of IEEE and ACM conferences on networks. He is a member of the IEEE and the ACM.





Vana Kalogeraki received the BS and MS degrees from the University of Crete, Greece, and the PhD degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2000. She now leads the Distributed Systems Research group at the Athens University of Economics and Business. Previously, she has held positions as an assistant and associate professor in the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Riverside (2002-2009) and as a research scientist at Hewlett-Packard Labs in Palo Alto, California (2000-2002). She has worked in the fields of distributed and real-time systems, distributed sensor systems, peer-to-peer systems, and mobile computing for more than 15 years. She has extensive industry and academic experience. Her research focuses on building general mechanisms that allow the development and management of complex distributed systems with multiple application quality of service (QoS), real-time, and reliability demands. She has published more than 100 journal and conference papers and contributions to books. Her work appears in the top journals and conferences in the field. She coauthored the Object Management Group (OMG) CORBA Dynamic Scheduling Standard (together with Eternal Systems, Lockheed Martin, Objective Interface Systems, Tri-Pacific Software, Vertel Corporation, and Mitre Corporation). Her research has been supported by the US National Science Foundation, the European Union, and gifts from SUN and Nokia. She was invited to give keynote talks at PETRA 2011, DBISP2P 2006, and MLSN 2006 in the area of sensor network middleware. She has delivered tutorials and seminars on peer-to-peer computing. She has served as the general cochair of IFIP SEUS 2009; as the general cochair of WPDRTS 2006 (in conjunction with IPDPS 2006); as a program cochair of IEEE MDM 2011, IEEE ISORC 2009, IEEE ISORC 2007, IEEE ICPS 2005, WPDRTS 2005, and DBISP2P 2003; as a demo chair for IEEE MDM 2012; as an area chair for IEEE ICDCS 2012; and as a program committee member for more than 100 conferences. She was awarded a Marie Curie Fellowship, two Best Paper Awards at the 24th IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS 2009) and the Ninth IEEE Annual International Symposium on Applications and the Internet (SAINT 2008), a Best Student Paper Award at the 11th IEEE/IPSJ International Symposium on Applications and the Internet (SAINT 2011), a UC Regents Fellowship Award, UC Academic Senate Research Awards, and a Research Award from HP Labs. She has been an associate editor for the Ad Hoc Networks Journal, the Computer Standards & Interfaces Journal, and the Peer-to-Peer Networking and Applications Journal.





Richard J. La received the BS degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1994 and the MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1997 and 2000, respectively. From 2000 to 2001, he was a senior engineer with the Mathematics of Communication Networks group at Motorola, Inc. Since 2001, he has been on the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and the Institute for Systems Research (ISR) at the University of Maryland, where he is currently an associate professor. He is currently on the editorial board for IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials and previously served on the editorial board of the Journal of Communications and Networks. He also served on technical program committees for several conferences, including IEEE INFOCOM, the IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC), IEEE GlobeCom, ACM MobiHoc, WiOpt, GameNets and GameSec. He was a cochair of tutorial sessions at ACM MobiHoc 2005 and ACM MobiCom 2008. He was a recipient of the US National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2003.





Xiang-Yang Li received two bachelor’s degrees, one from the Department of Computer Science and Technology and one from the Department of Business Management at Tsinghua University, P.R. China, both in 1995.He received the MS (2000) and PhD (2001) degrees from Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has been an associate professor (since 2006) and assistant professor (from 2000 to 2006) of computer science at the Illinois Institute of Technology. He is a recipient of the China National Science Foundation (NSF) Outstanding Overseas Young Researcher (B) award. He published a monograph, Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks: Theory and Applications, and coedited the book Encyclopedia of Algorithms. His research has been supported by the US NSF, Hong Kong RGC, and China NSF. His research interests include cyber physical systems, wireless sensor networks, game theory, and algorithms. He is an editor of several journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems. He is a senior member of IEEE.





Cecilia Mascolo received the MSc and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of Bologna, Italy. She is a reader in mobile systems in the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. Prior to this, she was with the Department of Computer Science, University College London, United Kingdom. Her research concentrates on mobility and social data gathering, analysis, modeling, and exploitation through research council and industry funded projects. Most of the projects are multidisciplinary. Her research strategy is heavily experimental and deployment oriented. She has published extensively in the areas of mobile sensor networks, mobile network routing, realistic mobility models, and social network analysis. She has served on the organization committees of many conferences and workshops on mobile and sensor systems, social networks, middleware, software engineering, and data mining including, MobiCom, MobiHoc, PerCom, Ubicomp, SenSys, Middleware, ICSE, FSE, and KDD. She is on the editorial boards of IEEE Internet Computing and IEEE Pervasive Computing. For more information, please visit http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~cm542.





Tommaso Melodia received the “laurea” (integrated BS and MS) and doctorate degrees in telecommunications engineering from the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” Italy, in 2001 and 2006, respectively. He received the PhD degree in electrical and computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2007. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (SUNY). He coauthored a paper that was recognized as the Fast Breaking Paper in the field of computer science for February 2009 by Thomson ISI Essential Science Indicators, and a paper that received an Elsevier Top Cited Paper Award. He is an associate editor for Computer Networks (Elsevier), IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, and ACM/Springer Wireless Networks. He has served on the technical program committees of several leading conferences in wireless communications and networking, including IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE SECON, ACM MobiCom, and ACM MobiHoc. He is the technical program committee vice chair for IEEE GlobeCom 2013 and IEEE INFOCOM 2013. His current research interests are in modeling, optimization, and experimental evaluation of wireless networks, with applications to cognitive and cooperative networking, multimedia sensor networks, and underwater networking. His research is currently funded by the US National Science Foundation, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, the US Office of Naval Research, Harris Corporation, Cameron, Intelligent Automation, and ANDRO Computational Solutions.





Guevara Noubir received the MS (engineer) degree from the Ecole Nationale Polytechnique d’Informatique et Mathematiques Appliques de Grenoble in France (ENSIMAG) and the PhD degree in computer science from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne in 1996. His research covers both theoretical and practical aspects of secure and robust wireless and mobile communication systems. Prior to joining Northeastern University in 2001, he was a senior research scientist at CSEM SA, Switzerland, where he led several research projects and contributed to the definition of the Third Generation Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS) standardized as 3GPP WCDMA, and the world’s first 3G demonstrator. He has held visiting research positions at Eurecom, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He is a recipient of the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He regularly serves as a TPC member for IEEE INFOCOM, ACM MobiCom, ACM MobiHoc, and ACMWiSec. He cochaired the TPC of ICCCN 2012. He received the Best Paper Award at ACM Wireless Networks Security (WiSec) 2012. He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the ACM.





Andrea W. Richa received the BS degree in computer science and the MS degree in computer systems from the Graduate School in Engineering (COPPE), both from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992 and 1990, respectively. She received the MS and PhD degrees from the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University in 1995 and 1998, respectively. She joined Arizona State University (ASU) as an assistant professor in August 1998, where she is now an associate professor in computer science and engineering at the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering. Her main area of research is network algorithms, in particular in the wireless domain. She received a US National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award in 1999 and has had many other research grants funded by NSF and other agencies. She is a member of the IEEE Computer Society. For more information, please visit http://www.public.asu.edu/~aricha.





Lakshminarayanan Subramanian is an assistant professor in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University (NYU). His research interests are in the areas of networks, distributed systems, and computing for development. He coleads the Networks and Wide-Area Systems (NeWS) group (which investigates software solutions for distributed systems, wireline and wireless networking, operating system, security and privacy, and technologies and applications for the developing world) and the CATER Lab at NYU (which focuses on developing and deploying low-cost, innovative technology solutions to some of the problems in developing regions in terms of communication, healthcare, and microfinance). He coestablished a new Center for Technology and Economic Development (CTED) at NYU Abu Dhabi which brings together students from several disciplines (computer science, economics, healthcare, education, and policy). He was the recipient of several awards including the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2009), the IBM Faculty Award (2009 and 2010), and the C.V. Ramamoorthy Award. He has been at the forefront of several technological innovations for development that have been used in several countries around the world. Many of his research works are now being commercialized by startups established by his students. He is the cofounder of two startups, Entrupy Inc. (paper fingerprinting) and Toodhu Mobile (mobile services in emerging regions).





Karthikeyan Sundaresan received the MS and PhD degrees from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is a research staff member in mobile communications and networking research at NEC Laboratories America. His research interests are in the areas of wireless networks and mobile computing spanning both algorithm design and system prototyping. He was a recipient of best paper awards at ACM MobiHoc 2008, IEEE ICNP 2005, and IEEE SECON 2005. He is a senior member of IEEE.





Xinbing Wang received the BS degree (with hons) from the Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, in 1998, and the MS degree from the Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2001. He received the PhD degree with a major in electrical and computer engineering and a minor in mathematics from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, in 2006. Currently, he is a faculty member in the Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China. His research interests include resource allocation and management in mobile and wireless networks, TCP asymptotics analysis, wireless capacity, cross layer call admission control, asymptotics analysis of hybrid systems, and congestion control over wireless ad hoc and sensor networks. He has been a member of the technical program committees of several conferences including ACM MobiHoc 2012, IEEE INFOCOM 2009-2012, IEEE ICC 2007-2012, IEEE GlobeCom 2007-2012.





Edmund Yeh received the BS degree in electrical engineering with distinction from Stanford University in 1994, the MPhil degree in engineering from the University of Cambridge in 1995, and the PhD degree in electrical engineering and computer science under Professor Robert Gallager from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2001. Since July 2011, he has been an associate professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Northeastern University. He was previously an assistant and associate professor of electrical engineering, computer science, and statistics at Yale University. He has held visiting positions at MIT, Princeton, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL). He was the recipient of the Humboldt Research Fellowship from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Young Investigator Award from the US Army Research Office, the Winston Churchill Scholarship from the Winston Churchill Foundation, the US National Science Foundation and US Office of Naval Research Graduate Fellowships, the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship from the US Congress, the Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Scholastic Award, and the President’s Award for Academic Excellence from Stanford University. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. He served as a guest editor for the special issue on wireless networks for Internet Mathematics and for the special series on smart grid communications for the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications in 2012. He served as a steering committee member for the IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm), as general cochair of the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS) Workshop on Connectivity and Resilience for Large-Scale Networks in 2012, and as general cochair for the Workshop on Spatial Stochastic Models for Wireless Networks (SpaSWiN) in 2010. He also served on the technical program committees of many leading conferences and workshops, including IEEE INFOCOM 2005-2012, GlobeCom 2004, ICC 2011, SmartGridComm 2011-2012, ACM MobiHoc 2012, IEEE WiOpt 2006-2012, IEEE Smart Grid World Forum 2011, IEEE IWQoS 2006 and 2011, IEEE NetSciCom 2011, IEEE WiNC 2009, and ICST WICON 2008.





Yanyong Zhang has 15 years of research experience in the areas of sensor networking, mobile computing, and high-performance computing. She is currently an associate professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rutgers University. She is also a member of the Wireless Information Networking Laboratory (Winlab). She has been involved in several US National Science Foundation (NSF) grants related to wireless networking, including the ORBIT wireless testbed, the PARIS project on privacy, the NSF CAREER award that focuses on developing robust wireless sensor networks, the ROME project that focuses on providing robust measurements in sensor networks, and the AUSTIN project that assures software radio trustworthy. She has organized several ACM/IEEE workshops on the Internet of Things and self-managing distributed systems (which has run for eight years). She organized the Network & Future Internet Symposium for WoCC 2011 and the Parallel and Distributed Computing track for ICCCN 2007. She served as a guest editor for the Journal of Computer Science for the special issue on reliability and autonomic management in 2005. She has served as a TPC member for many conferences, including IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE ICDCS, IEEE DSN, and ACM Wisec. She has served as a reviewer for many journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. She has published more than 70 papers in international journals and conferences. She is a member of the IEEE, the IEEE Computer Society, and the ACM.





Lin Zhong received the BS and MS degrees from Tsinghua University and the PhD degree from Princeton University in 1998, 2000, and 2005, respectively. He has been an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rice University since September 2005. He was a visiting researcher with Microsoft Research for the summer of 2011. He is a recipient of the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award and of best paper awards from ACM MobileHCI 2007, IEEE PerCom 2009, ACM MobiSys 2011, and ACM PhoneSense 2011. His research interests include mobile and embedded systems, human computer interaction, and nanoelectronics. He served on the TPC for MobiSys 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011; MobiCom 2009; HotMobile 2009, 2010, and 2012; and MobileHCI 2009 and 2010. He was a TPC cochair for ACM WiNTECH 2008 and ACM MobiSys 2012.

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