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Issue No.05 - May (2008 vol.7)
pp: 529-532
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
The IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing (TMC) is now in its seventh year, and has established an excellent reputation in the research community as the journal of choice for mobile computing. The quality and quantity of submissions that TMC receives are indicative of this. However, as I noted in my previous editorial, TMC remains very much a networking-centered journal in the types of papers it currently attracts. We hope to address this by attracting papers that reflect other aspects of mobile computing, such as novel platforms, energy management, operating systems extensions, user interfaces, deployment experience, low-power circuits, and signal processing. Having associate editors with expertise and high visibility in these areas is important to attracting papers from researchers in these fields and to be able to provide them with meaningful and fair reviews. It is with great pleasure that I therefore welcome 13 new associate editors to TMC's editorial board, many of whom are well-regarded researchers in these new areas, while the others strengthen our networking core. The new associate editors are: Saurabh Bagchi, Mark Corner, Sanjay K. Jha, Bhaskar Krishnamachari, Margaret Martonosi, Radha Poovendran, Anand Raghunathan, Ram Ramanathan, Paolo Santi, Tajana Šimunic Rosing, Alex C. Snoeren, Wade Trappe, and Nalini Venkatasubramanian. Their biographies are included below.
I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Elizabeth Belding, Bharat Bhargava, Hesham El Gamal, Yuguang "Michael" Fang, Virgil Gligor, Songwu Lu, Janise McNair, Adrian Perrig, Sumit Roy, Raghupathy Sivakumar, Krishna Sivalingam, and Vassilis Tsaoussidis, who retired from the editorial board in recent months. In addition, I am saddened to report that one member of our editorial board, Jennifer Hou, passed away in December. Like any journal, TMC depends on the incredible voluntary efforts of people such as these associate editors for sustaining its high quality, and I truly appreciate their dedicated services in recent years.
In closing, I would like to thank our readers and authors for their support of TMC, and I welcome you to send me feedback and suggestions about the journal.
Mani B. Srivastava
Editor-in-Chief



Saurabh Bagchi received the MS and PhD degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in 1998 and 2001, respectively. He is an assistant professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. He is a faculty fellow at the Cyber Center and has a courtesy appointment in the Department of Computer Science, Purdue University. At Purdue, he leads the Dependable Computing Systems Laboratory (DCSL), where he and a set of wildly enthusiastic students try to make and break distributed systems for the good of the world. His work is supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), Indiana 21st Century Research and Technology Fund, Avaya, Motorola, and Purdue Research Foundation, with equipment grants from Intel and Motorola. His papers have won the Best Paper Award at the IEEE International Conference on Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous, and Trustworthy Computing (SUTC '06) and been runners-up for the Best Paper Award at the 15th IEEE International Symposium on High Performance Distributed Computing (HPDC '06), the 2005 International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN), and MTTS 2005. He has been a member of the organizing committee and the program committee for DSN from 2003 and the Symposium on Reliable Distributed Systems (SRDS) from 2004.



Mark Corner received the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan. He has been an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst since 2003. His primary interests lie in the areas of mobile and pervasive computing and networking, file systems, and security. He was the recipient of a US National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2005, Best Paper awards at FAST 2007 and ACM Multimedia 2005, as well as the Best Student Paper Award at Mobicom 2002. Professor Corner is the program chair of the HotMobile 2008 Workshop and serves on the editorial board of IEEE Pervasive Computing.



Sanjay K. Jha received the PhD degree from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is a professor and head of the Network Group at the School of Computer Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales. His research activities cover a wide range of topics in networking, including wireless sensor networks, ad hoc/community wireless networks, resilience/quality of service (QoS) in IP networks, and active/programmable networks. Dr. Jha has published more than 100 articles in high quality journals and conferences. He is the principal author of the book Engineering Internet QoS and a coeditor of the book Wireless Sensor Networks: A Systems Perspective. He has been working as an industry consultant for major organizations such as Canon Research Lab (CISRA), DSTO, Lucent, and Fujitsu. He was a visiting scholar at the Distributed Computing and Communications Laboratory, Computer Science Department, Columbia University, New York, and a visiting professor with IIT-Bombay. He has also been a visiting researcher with Fujitsu Australia Ltd, Sydney, and CSIRO ICT Center, Australia. Dr. Jha was a member-at-large of the Technical Committee on Computer Communications (TCCC), IEEE Computer Society, for a number of years. He has served on the program committees of several conferences. Recently, he was general chair of the ACM Sensys 2007 symposium and cochair and general chair of the Ements-1 and Emnets-II workshops, respectively. He is a member of the IEEE and has been involved with the IEEE Computer Society Chapter NSW Australia as chair/secretary for a number of years.



Bhaskar Krishnamachari received the BE degree in electrical engineering from The Cooper Union in New York City in 1998. He received the MS degree in 1999 and the PhD degree in 2002 in electrical engineering from Cornell University. He is the MacDonald Early Career Chair Assistant Professor in the Ming Hsieh Electrical Engineering Department of the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC). He received the USC Viterbi School of Engineering Junior Faculty Research Award in 2005 and the US National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2004. He has received best papers awards from IPSN 2004 and MSWiM 2006. His research interests are in the design of algorithms and performance analysis of protocols for wireless networks. He is the author of a book titled Networking Wireless Sensors (Cambridge University Press).



Margaret Martonosi received the BS degree from Cornell University and the MS and PhD degrees from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. She is currently a professor of electrical engineering at Princeton University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. She also holds an affiliated faculty appointment in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University. Martonosi's research interests are in computer architecture and the hardware/software interface, with particular focus on power-efficient systems and mobile computing. In the field of processor architecture, she has done extensive work on power modeling and management and on memory hierarchy performance and energy. This has included the development of the Wattch power modeling tool, the first architecture-level power modeling infrastructure for superscalar processors. Her memory hierarchy work has included early performance-oriented studies, as well as more recent work on energy-aware memory hierarchies. In the field of mobile computing and sensor networks, Martonosi led the Princeton ZebraNet project, which included two real-world deployments of tracking collars on Zebras in Central Kenya. She is now the coleader of the Sarana project, which is building software interfaces for collaborative computing among mobile devices. Martonosi is a coauthor on more than 100 refereed publications and is an inventor on five granted US patents. She is on ACM SIGARCH's board of directors.



Radha Poovendran received the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1999. He is an associate professor and the founding director of the Network Security Lab (NSL) in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Washington, Seattle. His research interests are in the areas of applied cryptography for multiuser environments, wireless networking, and applications of information theory to security. He is the recipient of an NSA Rising Star Award, Faculty Early Career Awards including the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2001), ARO YIP (2002), ONR YIP (2004), and the PECASE (2005) for his research contributions to multiuser security, and the Graduate Mentor Recognition Award from the University of California, San Diego in 2006. He is a coeditor of the book Secure Localization and Time Synchronization in Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks (Springer-Verlag).



Anand Raghunathan received the BTech degree in electrical and electronics engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, and the MA and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Raghunathan is currently a senior research staff member at NEC Laboratories America in Princeton, New Jersey, where he leads research projects related to system-on-chip and embedded system architectures, design methodologies, and design tools. He has coauthored a book ( High-Level Power Analysis and Optimization, 1998), six book chapters, more than 150 refereed conference and journal publications, and 18 US patents and has presented several full-day and embedded conference tutorials in the above areas. He has received six best paper awards and three best paper nominations at leading ACM and IEEE conferences. He received a Patent of the Year Award and a Technology Commercialization Award from NEC in 2001 and 2005, respectively. He was chosen by MIT's Technology Review to be among the TR35 (top 35 innovators under 35 years across various disciplines of science and technology) in 2006 for his work on "making mobile secure." Dr. Raghunathan has been a member of the technical program and organizing committees of several leading conferences and workshops. He has served as a program and general cochair for the ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Low Power Electronics and Design and the IEEE VLSI Test Symposium. He has also served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on CAD, the ACM Transactions on Embedded Systems, the IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems, IEEE Design & Test of Computers, and the Journal of Low Power Electronics. He is currently a senior member of the IEEE. He was a recipient of the IEEE Meritorious Service Award (2001) and the Outstanding Service Award (2004) and was elected a Golden Core member of the IEEE Computer Society in 2001.



Ram Ramanathan received the Bachelor of Technology degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and received the MS and PhD degrees in computer and information sciences from the University of Delaware. He is currently a principal scientist at BBN Technologies, where he leads advanced research in the area of wireless networking. His current research interests include disruption/delay tolerant networking, routing and channel access in MANETs, cognitive radios, and novel network architectures. He has been the principal investigator for many DARPA programs including XG, FCS Communications, and Global Mobile Information Systems (GloMo). Dr. Ramanathan has served on the program committees of several conferences including ACM MobiCom, ACM MobiHoc and IEEE INFOCOM, and served on the editorial board of Ad Hoc Networks. He recently cochaired the MobiCom 2007 program committee. He has published more than 40 refereed papers in international journals and conferences, including best paper award-winning papers at MILCOM, INFOCOM, and SIGCOMM. He holds seven patents, all in the area of wireless networking.



Paolo Santi received the Laura Degree and the PhD degree in computer science from the University of Pisa in 1994 and 2000, respectively. He has been a researcher at the Istituto di Informatica e Telematica del CNR in Pisa, Italy, since 2001. During his career, he visited the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2001 and Carnegie Mellon University in 2003. His research interests include fault-tolerant computing in multiprocessor systems (during his PhD studies) and, more recently, the investigation of fundamental properties of wireless multihop networks such as connectivity, lifetime, capacity, mobility modeling, interference modeling, and cooperation issues. He has contributed more than 40 papers and a book in the field of wireless ad hoc and sensor networking. Dr. Santi has been a general cochair of ACM VANET 2007, will serve as a general cochair of ACM VANET 20008, and has been involved in the organizational committees of several conferences in the field. He has also been a member of the technical program committee of major networking conferences including ACM MobiHoc, ACM SenSys, IEEE Secon, IEEE ICDCS, IEEE Globecom, and IEEE DSN. He is a senior member of the ACM and SIGMOBILE.



Tajana Šimunic Rosing received the MS degree in electrical engineering from the University of Arizona. Her MS thesis topic was high-speed interconnect and driver-receiver circuit design. Between MS and PhD degrees, she worked as a senior design engineer at Altera Corporation for four years. She received the PhD degree in 2001 from Stanford University, while concurrently finishing the MS degree in engineering management. Her PhD topic was the dynamic management of power consumption. During her PhD degree, she started working as a research scientist at Hewlett Packard Labs and stayed there full time after graduation for a total of six years. She is currently an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in low-power system design, embedded systems, and wireless system design. Her papers have been nominated for the best paper award at ICCAD'06 and selected as one of the most influential papers in the last 10 years of DATE. She has served on a number of technical paper committees and has been an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems.



Alex C. Snoeren received the BS degree in computer science in 1996 and applied mathematics in 1997 and the MS degree in computer science in 1997 from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received the PhD degree in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003. He is an assistant professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego, where he is a member of the Systems and Networking Research Group. His research interests include operating systems, distributed computing, and mobile and wide-area networking. He was a recipient of the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2004, the MIT EECS George M. Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award (Honorable Mention) in 2003, and the Best Student Paper award at the ACM SIGCOMM conference in 2001 and 2007.



Wade Trappe received the BA degree in mathematics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1994 and the PhD degree in applied mathematics and scientific computing from the University of Maryland in 2002. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rutgers University and is an associate director of the Wireless Information Network Laboratory (WINLAB). His research interests include wireless security, wireless networking, multimedia security, and network security. He is a coauthor of Introduction to Cryptography with Coding Theory (Prentice Hall, 2001). He is a member of the IEEE, the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the IEEE Communications Society, the IEEE Computer Society, and the ACM. He is the recipient of the 2005 Best Paper Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society. Professor Trappe is currently the editor for the book review column of the IEEE Signal Processing Magazine and has served on the technical program committee for several IEEE conferences and workshops, including the IEEE Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM), the IEEE Conference on Sensor, Mesh and Ad Hoc Communications and Networks (SECON), and the IEEE Workshop on Networking Technologies for Software Defined Radio Networks.



Nalini Venkatasubramanian received the MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is currently an associate professor at the School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include distributed and parallel systems, middleware, multimedia systems and applications, mobile computing, and formal reasoning of distributed systems. She is specifically interested in developing safe and flexible middleware technology for highly dynamic environments including mobile and ubiquitous computing infrastructures. Dr. Nalini was a member of the technical staff at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Palo Alto, California, for several years, where she worked on large-scale distributed systems and interactive multimedia applications. She has also worked on various database management systems and on programming languages/compilers for high performance machines. She is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. She is a recipient of the US National Science Foundation CAREER Award and a Teaching Excellence Award from the University of California, Irvine. She has approximately150 publications and has participated in more than 50 technical program and organizing committees of international conferences.

For information on obtaining reprints of this article, please send e-mail to: tmc@computer.org.

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