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A Wireless MAC Protocol with Collision Detection
December 2007 (vol. 6 no. 12)
pp. 1357-1369
The most popular strategies for dealing with packet collisions at the Medium Access Control (MAC) layer in distributed wireless networks use a combination of carrier sensing and collision avoidance. When the collision avoidance strategy fails such schemes cannot detect collisions, and corrupted data frames are still transmitted in their entirety, thereby wasting the channel bandwidth and significantly reducing the network throughput. To address this problem, this paper proposes a new wireless MAC protocol capable of collision detection. The basic idea of the proposed protocol is the use of pulses in an out-of-band control channel for exploring channel condition and medium reservation and achieving both collision avoidance and collision detection. The performance of the proposed MAC protocol has been investigated using extensive analysis and simulations. Our results show that as compared with existing MAC protocols, the proposed protocol has significant performance gains in terms of node throughput. Additionally, the proposed protocol is fully distributed and requires no time synchronization among nodes.

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Index Terms:
MAC, wireless, collision detection, collision avoidance, CSMA, CSMA/CA
Citation:
Jun Peng, Liang Cheng, Biplab Sikdar, "A Wireless MAC Protocol with Collision Detection," IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 1357-1369, Dec. 2007, doi:10.1109/TMC.2007.1073
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