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Reducing the Calibration Effort for Probabilistic Indoor Location Estimation
June 2007 (vol. 6 no. 6)
pp. 649-662
WLAN location estimation based on 802.11 signal strength is becoming increasingly prevalent in today's pervasive computing applications. Among the well-established location determination approaches, probabilistic techniques show good performance and, thus, become increasingly popular. For these techniques to achieve a high level of accuracy, however, a large number of training samples are usually required for calibration, which incurs a great amount of offline manual effort. In this paper, we aim to solve the problem by reducing both the sampling time and the number of locations sampled in constructing a radio map. We propose a novel learning algorithm that builds location-estimation systems based on a small fraction of the calibration data that traditional techniques require and a collection of user traces that can be cheaply obtained. When the number of sampled locations is reduced, an interpolation method is developed to effectively patch a radio map. Extensive experiments show that our proposed methods are effective in reducing the calibration effort. In particular, unlabeled user traces can be used to compensate for the effects of reducing the calibration effort and can even improve the system performance. Consequently, manual effort can be reduced substantially while a high level of accuracy is still achieved.
Index Terms:
Location estimation, 802.11 signal strength, Bayesian methods, interpolation, Hidden Markov Model, EM.
Citation:
Xiaoyong Chai, Qiang Yang, "Reducing the Calibration Effort for Probabilistic Indoor Location Estimation," IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 649-662, June 2007, doi:10.1109/TMC.2007.1025
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