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Incremental Processing of Continual Range Queries over Moving Objects
November 2006 (vol. 18 no. 11)
pp. 1560-1575
Efficient processing of continual range queries over moving objects is critically important in providing location-aware services and applications. A set of continual range queries, each defining the geographical region of interest, can be periodically (re)evaluated to locate moving objects that are currently within individual query boundaries. We study a new query indexing method, called CES-based indexing, for incremental processing of continual range queries over moving objects. A set of containment-encoded squares (CES) are predefined, each with a unique ID. CESs are virtual constructs (VC) used to decompose query regions and to store indirectly precomputed search results. Compared with a prior VC-based approach, the number of VCs visited in a search operation is reduced from (4L^{2}-1)/3 to \log(L)+1, where L is the maximal side length of a VC. Search time is hence significantly lowered. Moreover, containment encoding among the CESs makes it easy to identify all those VCs that need not be visited during an incremental query (re)evaluation. We study the performance of CES-based indexing and compare it with a prior VC-based approach.

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Index Terms:
Query indexing, moving objects, mobile computing, location-aware applications, continual range queries.
Citation:
Kun-Lung Wu, Shyh-Kwei Chen, Philip S. Yu, "Incremental Processing of Continual Range Queries over Moving Objects," IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, vol. 18, no. 11, pp. 1560-1575, Nov. 2006, doi:10.1109/TKDE.2006.176
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