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A Knowledge-Based Fatal Incident Decision Model
August 1994 (vol. 6 no. 4)
pp. 534-548

A methodology for determining remains identification (ID) following a mass disaster is presented. The solution methodology is domain-independent and capable of addressing a wide range of assignment problems. A knowledge-based fatal incident decision model (FINDM) for providing a decision support to forensic scientists involved in the skeletal ID process is discussed. A mathematical framework for FINDM is developed that integrates a knowledge base with a network flow algorithm for resolving conflicts during the ID process. The FINDM framework has been implemented can an IBM PC and includes an observation advisor, an assignment advisor, and a conflict resolution module. Knowledge acquisition and representation issues are discussed, along with a numerical example and results. With respect to the remains ID problem, the FINDM approach shifts major efforts in resolving the problem from that of establishing a method of assignment to that of controlling the quality of data collected, improving domain knowledge, and analyzing conflicts.

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Index Terms:
knowledge acquisition; knowledge representation; expert systems; decision support systems; pattern recognition; disasters; anthropology; emergency services; knowledge-based fatal incident decision model; remains identification; mass disaster; FINDM; decision support; forensic scientists; skeletal ID process; knowledge base; network flow algorithm; IBM PC; observation advisor; assignment advisor; conflict resolution; knowledge acquisition; knowledge representation; domain knowledge,; antemortem data; postmortem analysis; forensic anthropology; trait evaluations; regression equations; contradiction factor
Citation:
S. Manivannan, S. Guthrie, "A Knowledge-Based Fatal Incident Decision Model," IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 534-548, Aug. 1994, doi:10.1109/69.298171
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